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Section 11. The Librarian shall cause to be kept a register of all 
books issued and returned ; and all books taken by the members of the 
Legislature, or its officers, shall be returned at the close of the session. If 
any person injure or fail to return any book taken from the Library, he 
shall forfeit and pay to the Librarian, for the benefit of the Library, three 
times tbo value thereof; and before the Controller shall issue his warrant 
in favor of any member or officer of the Legislature, or of this State, for 
his per diem, allowance, or salary, ho shall be satisfied that, such member 
or officer has returned all books taken out of the Library by him, and has 
settled all accounts for injuring such books or otherwise. 

Sec. 15. Books may be taken from tho Library by the members of the 
Legislature and its officers during the session of the same, and at any time 
by the Governor and the officers of the Executive Department nf this State 
who are required to keep their offices at the seat of government, the 
Justices of the Supremo Court, tho Attorney-General and the Trustees of 
the Library. 



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JAN. 1, 1870-Price Reduced to $4, and name 
of paper abreviated to " Scientific Press." 




hiing and Scientific Pre 





U.S. and Foreign 



1TENTS 



PATENT LAW 



And the Riffhts of Inventors. 




Patent Agents and Publishers 

Fining and Scientific xJress. 

Ofhce 414 Clay St., San Francisco. 

Branch Pffices in 
v, ishxnoton, d. c, london, 

paius, melbourne, 

AND IN OTUJElt FOKEIGN CITIES. 



Foreign Patents. 

In addition to Amerioan patents we secure, with 
the assistance of co-operative agents, claims in all 
foreign countries which grant patents, including 
Great Britain, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, 
Prussia, Austria, Russia, Spain. British India, 
Saxony, Sardinia, Norway, Sweden, Mexico, Vic- 
toria, Baden, Bavaria, Holland, Denmark, Italy, 
Portugal, Cuba, Roman States, British India, 
Wirtimburg, New Zealand, New South Wales, 
Queensland, Tasmania, Brazil, New Granada, 
Chile, Argentine Republic, AND EVERY 
COUNTRY IN THE WORLD where patents 
are obtainable. 

Our schedule prices for obtaining foreign patents, 
in all cases, will be as low as those of any other 
reliable agency. 

We can and do get foreign patents for inventors 
in rhe Pacific States from two to six months (ac- 
cording to the location of the country) sooner 
than any other agents. 

Many valuable and important inventions of 
Americans are being yearly surreptitously patented 
in foreign countries, some of which governments 
allow it, thus debarring those who have valuable 
inventions from their rights. 



Assignments. 



We make out assignments in the most substan- 
tial legal and improved forms, record the same in 
<ho Patent Office at Washington, and return the 
papers to the assignee, at a total cost of S5. 

Assignments of extra length or of a special 
character, will be made out and recorded on the 
most favorable terms. 

Assignments already made will be examined 
and opinions rendered regarding their validity, and 
the assignments recorded, when desired, for a 
moderate fee. 

Re-Issues. 

When, through "inadvertence, accident, or mis- 
take," an insufficient or defective patent has beeu 
issued, the defects in the Specification and Claims 
can be remedied by a re-issue. In order to obtain 
this, the inventor, or the holders of the patent, must 
surrender the patent, and file an amended specifi- 
cation and drawings, and a statement specifying 
the ground for asking for a re-issue. Re-issues are 
generally applied for after it has been found that 
the patent could not withstand litigation. It is, 
therefore, especially desirable that the new Specifi- 
cation and Claims should be prepared with great 
care and skill. Terms liberal in these cases. 

Unsuccessful Applicants 

Who are not satisfied with the reference sent to 
them from the Pateut Office, or are dissatisfied 
with the transactions of their agents, can have 
their cases thoroughly examined and reported on, 
by sending us their power of attorney so to do, 
for a small expense, at most. This can be done 
without revoking the power of other agencies or 
in any manner prejudicing the interests of the in- 
ventor. Cases which have been resting a long 
time in the Patent Office have been successfully 
undertaken by us to the great satisfaction of in- 
ventors. Parties who know themselves to be the 
first and true inventors of valuable inventions 
should not give up their chances, without investi- 
gation, simply because patents have been wrong- 
fully issued to others. 

Our Office. 

The office of the Mining and Scikntific 
Pkkss is located in the second story at No. 414 
Clay street, north side, just below Sansome. Here 
we have spacious accommodations, with our patent 
rooms, editorial room, counting room, and news- 
paper printing office, — all conveniently ar- 
ranged and connected, and our facilities for dis- 
patching business correctly and economically, 
better than ever before. Don't forget the number 
—414 Clay street, below Sansome. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Of our Illustrated C'imtlar. Sent free on receipt 
Of POSI 

I 

ADVANCING OASES 17 

ADVANTAGES, IMPORTANT li 

iSSKtNHEKTS, PORMS, COST, ETC 16, 17 

CAVEATS— OP WHAT THE* CONSIST; FORM 

ol;(OST; How FILED EFFECTIVELY.. U, 12 

COST OF OBTAINING PATENTS ... 8 

CONFIDENTIAL ADVICE 7 

COPIES OF PATENTS. ASSIGNMENTS, ETC. . . M 

COPYRIGHTS 9,33 

OH «G1 ttS OF DELAY 14 

DESIGNS, PATENTS FOE.. ■ ... 6,88 

ENGRAVINGS AND ILLUSTRATIONS ... 4ti 

KNtilNE. CONl>ENSlNii-BEAM. ILLUSTRATED. :«>. :il 

EXTENSION OF PATENTS 83. 4:i 

FOREIGN PATENTS-ALL COUNTRIES IS 

FOREIGN INVENTORS 40 

MINTS TO INVENTORS ... 18, 10, 33 to 37, 48 

GOVERNMENT PICKS. LIST OF S 

HOME COUNSEL 4a 

HOW to OBTAIN PATENTS— SxBPe Nkokbsa&y. 3 to 6 

HYDROSTATIC PRESS, ILLUSTRATED 30,30 

INTERFERENCES 4:1 

[NFLUENCE AT WASHINGTON 9 

LAWS (U.S.) AND DECISIONS RELATING TO 

PATENTS 33to:t7 

LATHE, ENGINE. ILLUSTRATED 311, 32 

LETTERS PATENT. OF WHAT THEY CONSIST, ti 

LIBRARY, REPORTS. LAW BOOKS 4'2 

LOCOMOTIVE ENGINE, ILLUSTRATED ...27.30 
MEDICINES OR COMPOUNDS, PATENT FOR. . 5 

MECHANICAL MOVEMENTS— ILLUSTRATED 20 to 32 
MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS OFFICE. .. 14, 47 

PROOESSES, PATENTS FOR 5 

RECORD OF PACIFIC COAST PATENTS 42 

RE-ISSUES 39 

REJECTIONS-CAUSE AND REMEDY 15,40 

REPORTS OF PATENT OFFICE 42 

RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES OF INVENTORS 

AND PATENTEES. 18, 19,33 to 37 

BAYING OF TIME 9 

SELF-EVIDENT FACTS 10 

SELLING PATENT RIGHTS 32 

SPRINGS. VARIOUS KINDS. ILLUSTRATED. .. 29,30 
STAMP BATTERY, QUARTZ, ILLUSTRATED.. 29,30 

TELEGRAPH. PATENT BUSINESS BY 9 

UNSUCCESSFUL APPLICANTS 15,40 

WHO CAN OBTAIN LETTERS PATENT 6 

WHAT CLAIMS CAN BE PATENTED 8 

WORTHLESS PATENTS, CANDID REASONING, 38 



Home Counsel. 

We are frequently consulted by persons who have 
rejected cases which they sent months previous 
through distant agencies — (hastily paying their 
first and last government fees, expressagc, and ex- 
traordinary charges of agents) — when we could 
have shown in the start precisely similar drawings 
and descriptions in the Patent Office Reports in 
our office, thus saving such applicants their useless 
expenditure of money and their long suspense. 

We invite the acquaintance of all parties con- 
nected with inventions and patent right business, 
believing that the mutual conference of legitimate 
business and professional men is mutual gain. 
Parties in doubt in regard to their rights as as- 
signees of patents, or purchasers of patented arti- 
cles, can often receive free advice of importance to 
them, from a short call at our office. 

In Our Library 

We have the only complete set of U. S. Patent 
Office Reports (from 1844) on this coast ; a fuU 
record of all patents issued since 1790 ; Record of 
British patents from 1801, and full files of scien- 
tific papers containing illustrations and list of 
U. S. Patent Claims ; Illustrated Mechanical, 
Philosophical, and Law Books and Reports, of the 
very highest authority, forming the only extensive 
library of patent works west ot the Rocky Moun- 
tains. We offer patentees and inventors the free 
use of these books at our office. The files of the 
Mining and Scientific Press contain the 
claims of the Pacific .Coast Patents, and many 
illustrated descriptions of the same. We have 
also in our office full copies of a large majority of 
the patent cases emanating on the Pacific Coast. 

Interferences. 

Inteerfekino Applications arc conducted 
with spirit and ability on the most favora- 
ble terms, by DEWEY & CO. It sometimes 
happens that an applicant finds his invention has 
been patented by another, but more recent discov- 
erer. In such cases the prior discoverer can ob- 
tain full right to the invention if he can produce 
tangible evidence of priority. 

When patentees are threatened with interfer- 
ence they should consult able and responsible 
agents before they either allow themselves to be 
backed down from th**ir rights, or trespass upon 
the rights of others. We will always counsel and 
advise in such cases upon tho most reasonable 
terms — often saving clients heavy damages and 
exorbitant fees. 

Copies of Patents. 

Full copies of U. S. Patents will be furnished in 
the shortest time possible, at favorable rates. 

Copies of the claims of U. S. Patents will he 
furnished without delay, from the reports in our 
office, at trifling expense. State the name of pat- 
entee and assignees, and date and No. of the pat- 
ent, if possible. 

Copies of Patents in foreign countries expedi- 
tiously furnished at moderate rates. 

Extensions. — U- S. Patents issued prior to 
1861, are subject to extension for seven yeas, pro 
vided some ostensible reason can be shown the 
Government for so doing. Patentees who have, 
from circumstances beyond their control, been de- 
prived of the full benefit of their patents for any 
considerable time, are usually successful in ob- 
taining an extension of the same, when presented 
through our agency. 

Influence at Washington. — No inventor 
can possibly have better facilities or more influ- 
ence (through friends or agents, at Washington or 
elsewhere), to secure their patents sooner or more 
surely, than ourselves. Our influence at Wash- 
ington is unrivalled, so far as success for applica- 
tions from the Pacific States und Territories are 
concerned. 



Dewey & Co. 



American and Foreign 



@SSt 



(He 



Intent 

ix 1 




x\«. 



11J, Clay Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Patents Obtained Promptly. 

Caveats Filed Expeditiously. 

Patent Reissues Taken Out. 

Assignments Made ;uul Recorded in Legal Form. 

Copies of Patents and Assignments Procured. 

Examinations of Patents made here and at 

Washington. 
Examinations made of Assignments Recorded 

in Washington. 
Examinations Ordered and Reported by Tklk- 

OEAPH. 

Rejected Cases taken up and Patents Obtained. 

Interferences Prosecuted. 

Opinions Rendered regarding the Validity of 

Patents and Assignments. 
Every Legitimate Branch of Patent Agency Bus- 
iness promptly and thoroughly conducted. 
DEWEY & CO., 
Mining and Scientific Press, 

San Francisco. 
Circulars Free. 



Illustrate your Inventions. 

One of the best means — and the cheapest, too — 
for eliciting attention to a new invention, is that of 
illustrating and describing if in the columns of tho 
Mining and Scientific Press. To do this in 
the case of a meritorious improvement (and none 
other will be accepted), will cost our patrons no 
more than the price of a first-class engraving. 

Superior Engraving Done. 

We also take especial pains in furnishing en- 
gravings and electrotypes of superior merit, of all 
kinds, at fair rates, and tender our patrons the 
benefit of our practice and experience, by advice 
and assistance, in getting up their circulars, adver- 
tisements, etc. 

With a poor representation we desire to have 
nothing to do, as it would be calculated to injure 
both the inventor and ourselves. 

Too many ingenious inventors lose the product of 
their genius and labor by not bringing their im- 
provements conspicuously or plainly enough before 
the public — the general reading public. 

Reasons for Success. 

We would especially call the attention of the in- 
ventive public to the fact that our Patent Agency 
is taking out a larger number of Patents than any 
other agency west of the Mississippi River. We 
do our work promptly and thoroughly, and refer 
to our standing amongst inventors as an evidence 
of our success in our special department. Our 
work is all done inside of our office, by competent 
and reliable peufons, who have been for years 
interested and associated with us. We therefore are 
not compelled (like many agencies) to trust valua- 
ble and important inventions promiscuously to out- 
siders, to have part of the case prepared, but in- 
ventors can depend that, from the time their cases 
are first placed in our office, they are kept with 
proper secrecy until lull rights are secured in the 
Patent Office in Washington. This is an import- 
ant point in the proper prosecution of Patent busi- 
ness. It is a notorious fact that some prominent 
agencies trust a considerable portion of their cases 
to apprentices and amateurs. A deficiency or 
want of attention to the small affairs of any kind 
of business will often prove as harmful as a fla- 
grant violation of the most important rules which 
govern and control it. 

Volunteer Compliments. 

From an endless series of appreciative testimo- 
nials and frank acknowledgements, we give the 
following : 

San Francisco, May 6, 18G9. — Messrs. Dewey & Co. 
Gentlemen: — Allow nie to express to you many thanks 
fur services rendered me in procuring my patent, which 
has just come to hand. I would also nay that your work 
has been faithfully done, and your advice and represen- 
tations have in all cases been honest and truthful. 

Respectfully, Geo. Inwood. 

San Francisco, April 19, 1859. 

Messrs. Dewey & Co., Patent Agents. — Gentlemen; — 
Allow me herewith to tender you my sincere thanks for 
the efficient assistance you have rendered me in secur- 
ing my patent, and other papers, as well as the prompt- 
ness and energy displayed by you in our business trans- 
actions. Very respectfully yours, C. E. Jaycox. 

We have had frequent occasion to have business rela- 
tions with the patent agency connected with this estab- 
lishment, and have had nothing left to deBire in regard 
to it, Fidelity, promptness and courteHy, soon arranged 
everything for ub to our complete satisfaction. Having 
had frequent delays at Washington while in that city, we 
have been Burpris ed at the promptitude with which some 
of our friends obtained their patents through the agency 
of Messrs. Dewey & Co. — S. F. Spiritual Light. 

G-BAS8 Valley, Dec. 2, 18(>S— Messrs Dewey & Co.- — 
Having received the patent for Symons & Co's Tossing 
and Refining Concentrator, through your. Agency, we 
return our sincere thanks to you for your unrivalled 
succeBb. Yours, respectfully, Symons & Harry. 

Lexington, April 3, 1869. 

Deab Sirs : — The Letters Patent have just come to 
hand For the prompt and businees-like manner with 
which you have put the matter through, please accept 
my thanks. Geo. W. Teabdale. 

To Dewey &i Co., Publishers M. & S. Press. 

Stockton, April 8th, 1869. 

Messrs. Dewey k Co.: — Your favor of the 6th inst., 
accompanying patent for improvement in horse shoes, 
is received. Ibeg you will accept the earnest assurance 
of my gratitude for your kind assistance and valuable 
services. Very truly yours, W. R. Watson. 

DEWEY & CO., 
Mining and Scientific Press Patent Agency, 
No, 414 Clay St., San Francisco. 



Subscribe for the 

Mining and Scientific Press. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY, 

— BY — 

I>E"WEY c*s CO., 

414 Clay Street, San Francisco. 

If you arc an Inventor, Patentee, Miner, 
Farmer, Manufacturer, Mechanic, or a progress- 
ive Student or Artisan in any Industrial or Pro- 
fessional Calling in the Pacific States or Ter- 
ritories, you are doing yourself irreparable in- 
justice, if not already a subscriber and reader 
of tlio Mining and Scikntific Phess. 

It contains hints and information enough to 
repay the subscription price many times in a 
single month. 

Its columns are filled with instructive read- 
ing in plain, comprehensible and attractive form 
to minds of ordinary intelligence. 

It contains 10 pages and 64 columns of the 
size of Harpers's Weekly, and is the best printed 
and most valuable paper on the western half of 
the continent. All claims of patents issued to 
inventors on this coast are reported. Illustra- 
tions of new machinery are given each week. 
Descriptions of new inventions and discoveries 
throughout the world, are given, with fresh and 
comprehensive information of scientific devel- 
opments and mechanical and industrial prog- 
ress, which cannot be obtained from books, or 
readily found gathered in so convenient a 
form elsewhere. Subscribe now, and you will 
not regret it. 

OPINIONS OP THE PRESS. 

Mining and Scientific Press. — The Mining and Sci- 
entific Press, published at San Francisco by Dewey & Co., 
is one of the most valuable of our exchanges. 

Miners, mechanics, and the reading public generally, 
will find its regular perusal profitable and interesting. 

Its scope and purpose are expressed in the title, and 
we recommend miners and mechanics in particular to 
subscribe for it. Terms $5 per annum, in advance. — 
Trinity Journal, Marcli 13th. 

Mining and Scientific Press. — This useful and bcI. 
entific journal has entered upon its eighteenth volume. 

To the scientific, mechanic, and practical men of all 
classes it is almost invaluable; and we are glad to learn 
that it is increasing in patronage every day. 

Tho publishers, Dewey &z Co., San Francisco, say the 
present volume shall be Buperior in an respects to its 
predecessors. 

The terms are S3 in advauce, $3 for six months. — San 
Bernardino Guardian, Mardi Gilt. 

The Prebb is one of the most valuable and instructiv e 
papers published in the United States, and every miner, 
millman, machinist and foundrymau should be a sub- 
scriber. The information to be derived from its columns 
is worth many fold times the subscription. — Grass Valley 
National. 

Mining and Scientific Press. — This exeeUent scien- 
tific journal has entered upon its eighteenth volume. — 
Chico Courant, Jan. 15th. 

The Mining and Scientific Press should have an *xten- 
sive circulation in every mining community on the 
Coast.— Placer Herald, Dec. 19. 

W, Frame Stewart is Dewey k Co's accredited agent 
for the Patent business in this city, and will attend to 
their affairs in that specialty. — San Jose Mercury. 

Mining and Scientific Press. — This journal is de- 
voted to mining and scientific researches, and has been 
conducted with great ability. It has been greatly en- 
larged and improved.— San Jose Patriot. 

The Mining and Scientific Press has become al- 
most indispensable to the miner and machinist, and is 
well deserving of the patronage which we are pleased to 
learn it receives. — Mariposa Mail, Jan. HUi. 

The Press is a credit to the State, and is fast gaining 
in popularity. It commends itself to all classes, and we 
hope many in this section wuU become subscribers. — 
Pajaronian. 

These gentlemen not only print a flrBt-claBs scientific 
and mining journal, but are also trustworthy Patent 
Agents, and doing much towards the inventive business 
of thiB coast. — San Jose Mercury. 

The Mining and Scientific Press commenced a new 
volume with the new year. It i6 a credit to the State, 
and to the mechanic or miner, is a great source of valua- 
ble information. It has every appearance of prosperity, 
and we hope it may continue growing in wealth and in- 
fluence. — Pajaron ian. 

We Consider the Mining and Scientific Prebb the 
most valuable mining and mechanical newspaper iBSued 
in the United States. Dewey & Co., publishers, are also 
solicitors of foreign and American patentB and conduct 
patent eases of every kind. We guarantee that aU busi- 
ness confided to them will be carefully attended to, and 
we further believe that every miner, mechanic, and sci- 
entific man should have their valuable papsr. — Auburn 
Stars dnd Stripes. 

New Volume. — The Mining and Scientific Prebb has 
entered upon another year's work looking improved and 
promising. This paper is devoted to the interests of the 
scientific world, and to the miner and mechanic is al- 
most invaluable. — Gilroy Advocate. 

To MrNKRs. — William H. Murray, traveling agent for 
the Mining aud Scientific Press, pubhshed by Dewey & 
Co., of San Francisco, is in town soliciting subscriptions 
for that paper. To the intelligent miner, a paper like 
the Press is particularly valuable, keeping him posted on 
the latest discoveries in reduction of ores, new machin- 
ery, etc. — Grass Valtey National. 

Mining and Scientific Press. — We look upon this 
papet as one of our most valuable exchanges, in fact 
it deservedly stands at the head of all publications em- 
bracing mining, scientific and mechanical subjects, 
and contains much miBceUaneous matter of interest, 
and is a gem of neatness. The Press is published by 
Dewey & Co., San Francisco, and at its present low price 
of five dollars per annum, should be patronized by every 
one, but more especioUy by miners, mechanics and in- 
ventors who wish to pursue their avocations with intel- 
ligence and economy. — Tidal Wave', Idaho. 

Tiik Mining and Scientific Pkess lias entered upon itfl 
XVlIili Volume. It has donned a new-style hat; or, in 
newspaper parlance, a new heading, which gives it the 
solid, scientfnc look it merits. Other improvements typn- 
Kra- hicalarp also noticeable. No call for improvement in 
its matter. — Amador Ledger. Jv.li/ 18th. 

Thk Mining and Scihntific Prkds, which commenced 
ts seventeenth volume on the 4th, comes to ns with h new- 
ly engraved head, and presenting otherwise its usual tnsie- 
'iil appearance. We take Ihfs occasion to say that the 
Press none of the best papers of the kind in the United 
States, and every miner and mechanic in the State, as well 
as the business man, who would keep posted on our indus- 
trial resources, should have its name on its subscription 
books Nenaila. Gazette. 

Subscription, $5 per annum ; $3 for ■ six 
months — in advance. Sample copies free. 

DEWEY & CO., 

V. S. and Foreign Patent Agents, 
No. 414 Clay st., San Francisco. 

(TURN OVER,.) 






ON THE 

Pacific Coast. 



Mechanical Movements, from Dewey & Co's Free Illustrated Pamphlet. 

PI-ATE I. PLATE V. 



Messrs. DEWEY & CO. 

Take occasion to call your attention to the 
followin s rules, regulations and suggestions 
relative to the obtaining of LETTERS PAT- 
ENT of the United States: 



Established in I860. 

Our business has been long and successfully 
practiced, and we are thoroughly responsible for 
the confidence and valuable trusts placed in our 
charge. Our advice can always be relied upon as 
correct. 

The principal portion of the patent business of 
this coast has been done, and is still being done, 
through our agency. We are familiar with and 
have full records of all former cases, and can more 
correctly judge of the value and patentability of 
inventions discovered here, than any other agents. 

Steps Necessary to Procure a 
Patent. 

The first thing required is a model, if your in- 
vention can be represented by one. It is not only 
immediately necessary in preparing the papers, 
but the law demands that the inventor shall, in all 
cases, furnish a model, which must not exceed 
twelve inches in any of its dimensions. A model 
of less size will answer when more convenient. It 
should he neatly made, of hard wood or metal, or 
both, and varnished or painted; the name of the 
inventor and the name of the article should be en- 
graved or painted on it in a permnnent manner. 

When the invention consists of an improvement 
on some known machine, a full working model of 
the whole will not be necessary. It should be suf- 
ficiently perfect, however, to show, with clearness, 
the nature and operation of the invention, and the 
relation of the new to the old parts of the ma- 
chine. 

As soon as the model is ready, it should be care- 
fully boxed and shipped by express, or otherwise, 
to our address, namely: DKWEY & CO., Mining 
and Scientific Press, San Francisco. Prepay ex- 
penses and send express receipt to us by mail. 

A full description must also be sent with the 
model, embodying all the ideas and claims of the 
inventor respecting the improvement, describing 
the various parts anil their operation. 

Simultaneous^' with the model, the inventor 
should send us the first instalment of the Govern- 
ment fee, fifteen dollars. The money may be for- 
warded either by express with the model, or by 
registered letter, post office order, or by draft on San 
Francisco, payable to our order. Always send a 
letter with the model, and with the remittance, stat- 
ing the name and address of the sender. On re- 
ceipt of the model and Government first fee of 
815 in currency, the case is duly registered on our 
books, and the application proceeded with as fast as 
possible. When the documents arc ready we send 
them to the inventor by mail, for his examination, 
signature and acknowledgement before a Notary 
Public or Justice of the Peace, with a letter of in- 
struction, etc. Our fee for preparing the case is then 
due and will be called for- The case will then be 
presented to the Patent Office, and as soon as the 
patent is ordered to be issued the Government last 
fee of S20 in currency will bo required. The law 
states that every patent shall be dated as of a day 
not later than six months after the li.ne at which 
it was passed and allowed, and notice thereof sent 
to the applicant or his agent. And if the final fee 
for such patent be not paid within the said six 
months, the patent shall be withheld, and at the 
expiration of two years the invention therein de- 
scribed shall become public property as against the 
applicant therefor. 

When the invention consists of a new article of 
manufacture, a medicine, or a new composition, 
samples of the separate ingredients, sufficient to 
make the experiment, (unless they are of a common 
and well known character), nnd also of the manu- 
factured article itself must bo furnished, with full 
description of tb.2 entire preparation. 

For Processes, frequently no model or drawings 
are necessary. In such case the applicant has 
only to send us an exact description, and what it 
is desirable to claim. 

For Designs no models arc necessary. Dupli- 
cate drawings arc required, and the purifications 
and other papers should be made up with care and 
accuracy. In some instances two photographs, 
with the negatives, answer well instead of drawings. 

Inventors who do business with us will be noti- 
fied of the state of their application in the Patent 
Office, when it is possible for us to do so We do 
not require the personal attendance of the inventor, 
unless the invention is one of great complication, 
usually the business can be well done by corres- 
pondence. 

The usual time required to secure a patent, when 
thecuse is conducted at our agency, is from one 
to two months. We sometimes get them through in 
two weeks. In rare cases, however, owing to delay 
on the part of Government officials, the period is 
sometimes extended for months. Wo make a 
special point to advance our cases as rapidly as 
possible, and have been successful in obtaining 
patents for this coast more surely and speedily 
than any other agency in the United States. 

Letters Patent and Who Can 
Obtain them, 

A patent is an open letter, embodying all the 

language of an inventor or his agent, contained in 

he specification, without alteration, anil is granted 

citizens of tho United States, or Foreigners, 




PL VTK l.-Aeeiilplfon. 

1. Transmitting motion from a shaft at right angles to 
another, Ly means of two guide pulleys. 

2. Cone pulleys for varying the speed of lathes, etc. 

3. Cone-pulleys. Used in cotton machinery, affording 
a gradually increased or diminished speed. 

4. A system of pulleys known as Spanish bartuns. 

5. Compound pulley. The effect of the whole will be 
equal to the number 2, multiplied by itself as many 
times as there are movable pulleys in the system. 

6. Belts and pulleys. 

7. A flange pulley for a flat belt. 
S. Aplain pulley for a flat belt. 

0. A concave-grooved pulley for a round band. 

10. A smooth surface V-grooved pulley for around 
band or steel wire. 

11. Several wheels, by connecting-rods driven from 
one pulley. 

1-s. Lever with bearing roller to tighten bands. 

13. "Crown-wheel" on the right gearing, with a "spur- 
gear." 

14. Beveled gear. 

15. Elliptic gears, for varying speed. 

16. Rectangular gears, producing a varying Bpeed. 

17. Different velocity given to two gears, A and C, on 
the same shaft, by the pinion B. 

18. A uniform intermittent rotary motion in opposite 
directions is given to the bevel-gears, A and B, by means 
of the mutilated bevel-gear, C. 

19. Scroll-gears for obtaining a gradually increasing 
speed. 

at) Oblique toothed wheels. 

21. Friction cones. (Sectional view.) 

22. Friction pulleys. 

23. Revolving into reciprocating motion, by an end- 
less segmental rack and pinion, the axle of which re- 
volves and slides in a slot toward and from the rack. 
This rack is secured to a disk, and a rope round said 
disk extends to the body, to which a reciprocating mo- 
tion is to he imparted. 

24. "Worm and worm wheel. 

25. Transmitting motion, with three different veloci- 
ties, by means of toothed segments of unequal diameters. 

2fi. For similar purpose as 18. 

27. Variable alternating traverse of the bar by the un- 
equal gear wheels. 

M8. Revolving motion by a circular sliding pinion 
gearing in a elliptical cog-wheel. 

PLATE V.— Description 

113. The principal and most common variety of 
springs used in machinery: a, spiral spring; A, india 
rubber spring; e, the volute spring, made of sheet-steel 
wound, cone-shaped; d, elliptic spring; /, the C spring; 
b, coileid or watch-spring. 

114. Common Derrick crane. 

115. Sectional side view of a quartz mill battery. 
The mortar at the bottom is partly V-shaped, containing 
the die setting on the bed; stamp resting on the die; 
stem extending upward through the cross-timbers or 
guides; tappet on the upper part of stem resting on the 
cam that raises and drops the stamp, stem and tappet 
together at each revolution. 

116. Hydrostatic press. Water forced by the pump 
on the right through the small pipe into the ram cylin- 



der, and under the solid ram on the left, presses up the 
ram. The amount of force obtained is in proportion to 
the relative areas or squares of diameters of the pump- 
plunger and ram. Suppose, for instance, the pump- 
plunger to be one inch diameter and the ram thirty 
inches, the upward pressure received by the ram would 
be 900 times the downward pressure of the plunger. The 
same principle is applied in hydrostatic jacks, and for 
massive brick buildings. 

117. Locomotive engine, The boiler, A A, and tha 
engines, of which G- is one cylinder, rest on the frame 
which extends from N to M, and contains the jaws and 
driving-boxes under the springs, as shown. The frame 
rests in front on the springs of the forward truck, of 
which X X are the wheels, and hangs behind on the 
equalizing beam K, extending to the springs. The cir- 
cle H H represents the trailing-driver, and J J the lead- 
ing-driver. B is the smoke-box, C the chimney, W the 
ash-pan, E the sand-box, and D the steam dome just 
forward of tho cab. The line V G represents the piston- 
rod, U V the connecting-rod, and U U the parallel rod. 
T is the steam-cheBt, containing the valve ; T S the 
valve-rod, and S R the rocker arms on the rock-shaft. 
The link-motion extends between the forward driving- 
shaft and the arm R, and, with R S T, forms the valve- 
gear. The pumps P (forward of leading-driver) draw 
water from the tender through the feed-pipe O P, and 
force it into the boiler through the check-valve Q. 

118. Improved Lenoir gas engine — a French inven- 
tion. The piston-head B is represented midway of the 
cylinder ; A, piston-rod ; a gas jet is introduced with a 
quantity of air suflicient for combustion at each end of 
the cylinder alternately, and ignited by an electric 
spark by conducting wires E and F at c c. The electric 
spark is generated at tho proper moment by the poles of 
tne galuanic battery becoming momentarily connected 
by revolution at D. 

lis*. The six mechanical powers which are the basis 
of all mechanical movements and combinations : 1, 
lever ; 2, inclined plane ; 3, wheel and axle ; 4, screw ; 
5, pulley ; 6. wedge. 

14.i. Condensing beam-engine, a, steam-cylinder; 
ft, piston ; c, upper steam-port or passage ; d, lower 
steam-port ; e e, parallel motion ; //, beam ; g, connect- 
ing-rod ; h, crank ; i i, fly-wheel ; k k, eccentric and its 
rod for working the steam-valve ; J, steam-valve and 
valve-casing ; m, throttle-valve ; n, condenser ; o, injec- 
tion-cock ; p, air-pump ; q, hot-well ; )■, shifting-valve, 
for creating a vacuum in the condenser, previous to 
starting the engine ; s, feed-pump for supplying the 
bailers ; t , cold water pump for supplying the condenser 
cistern; u, governor. 

i2i. Sectional view of Root's patent blower for fur- 
naces, etc. Air is drawn in through the lower pipe and 
forced out in the direction indicated by the arrows by 
the rapid revolution of the double vanes which closely 
follow each other and the inner side of the shell or 
case containing them. 

1^2. Engine lathe. Upon the shears, or framing, A, 
stand the fixed head-stock, M, (which carries the spin- 
dleandface-plate.F,) the movable tail-stock, C, and tho 
compound rest, D, which iB moved longitudinally by the 
lead-screw, actuated by the feed, L, and upon which 
stand the tool-stock and tool-reBt. 



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Some of the advantages to be obtained by pat- 
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Inventors on this coast having their applica- 
tions for patents made out through our agency, 
can sign their papers at once, and thus secure 
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Many inventions on this coast are for objects 
and purposes but little understood by parties at 
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personal verbal explanation is oftentimes of im- 
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Extensive practice gives us great facilities, se- 
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THE WORLD where patent laws exist. 

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consult with us respecting the same, are cordially 
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(TURN OVER..) 




A Journal of Useful Arts, Science, Mining, Farming, and Mechanical Progress. 



BV r>i-.\vi:v ,t oo. 

l'llt.Mll Hullcltoi'N. 



San Francisco, Saturday, July 3, 1869. 



"VOLUME XIX. 
JNumbor 1. 



Table of Contents. 



Action •>( tii- Knley Saw 

Illii'tr.iii'il. 
Vorlx Combination Look 

— Illtmtnit.'ii. 
Sh.m.M Scientific School 

of Yale College. 
Tin* M-.-haolcs' Inntitute — 

QuarU-rly Meeting. 
A Noted Orutr. .-■;. 
The Coining I'mrs. 

Tfca Australian Oolantos. 

Increase of Temperature in 

Depth. 

ftulMtt ami Apprentices. 

Combinations in Labor and 
Capital. 

AoootUlt of Reveille and 
AdJoiuiiiK District*. 

Cabinet Collections— Prof. 
Ward. 

Perpetual Motion. 

Trd.l of tho Avitor. 

Resourced and Develop- 
ment *. 

8bitri-'lniUlors' Directory. 

Weekly Stock Circular. 

Noticed to Correspondents. 

San Francisco Metal Market 

COM ['ANY TltVNaACTIONB.- 
Heelings, Elections, etc 
New Incorporations. 



'Stock Prices — Bid and asked 
|8au FrauclBco Market Bates. 
Famili.vr BOIKHOI — Reten- 
tion of Water in Vege- 
tables und Fruit; Wasting 
Fuel; The Soil. etc. 

MfiCHAKICAL PROGRESS. — 

A New Form of Steel- 
ltftils; Artifldal Stone; A 
New Sham l'uuip; Tung- 
«ti-u Steel) eto. 

Sciknywic Puooneas. — 
Source of Light in Flame; 
Ancient Human Remains; 
Chemical Action Arrested 
by Pressure, etc. 

Enqi nhkbi.no.— Adams' Hy- 
draulic Wheel; Mining; 
Public Surveys; Impro- 
vised Ditching Machine. 

Farming and Gardening. — 
Deformed Cattle; Crystal- 
lizing Flowers; Artificial 
Coloring of Plants; Culti- 
vated and Utilizing of 
Oats ; Horticulture in 
Greenland, etc. 

Mining Summary. — Califor- 
nia, Arizona, Colorado, 
Idaho, Nevada, New Mex- 
ico, Utah und Wyoming. 



Vorbe's Improved Combination Lock. 

Combination locks are the perfection of 
mathematical and mechanical science. Un- 
less the number, the cabalistic open sesame 
be known, the safe remains closed even to 
the confidential clerk in the office. But 
continued guessing and trying may, in the 
ordinary combination lock, succeed. Mr. 
Vorbe, of San Fraucisco, has brought 
mathematical science to the rescue, and 
made this next to impossible — or the work 
of a lifetime, and therefore not very likely 
to be undertaken. The graduated disks H, 
I, J, are set to any desired number, as in 
all the combination locks; and the mathe- 
matics of this very ingenious but simple 
invention is such that on missing the cor- 
rect combination once, from carelessness or 
accident, a Becond attempt is practicable 
immediately; but if that fails too — evincing 
an unmistakable ignorance of the secret 
number, — the lock seems almost to exercise 
the intelligence of reason, and to become 
suspicious, for it will then be impossible to 
make another combination that could draw 
the bolt short of 50,000 turns of the knob, 
E, an eight or ten hours' job; there being 
possible, in all, 1,000,000 combinations. 
Such arrangement makes it a ridiculous 
undertaking to tamper with Mr. Vorbe's 
lock under any circumstances — and the 
holder of the secret number is, accord- 
ingly, absolutely secure. 

So intricate is the mechanics of combi- 
nation locks that those who are not familiar 
with the subject could not easily be made 
to comprehend the interior working, even 
from an engraving; though the essential 
parts are here shown in the sectional view. 
The operation of the lock may be described 
as follows : 

Before locking the safe the small hands 4, 5, 
G, 7 (Fig. 2) on the back of the lock, are turned 
around till they point to the dots shown on the 
lock plate outside their periphery ; this brings 
the wheels Q, R, S, T, into a position where, 
if moved, the pin of Q is ready to act on B, 
the pin of E on S, the pin of S on T, and one 
of the pins T on the lever Z. 

To unlock the safe, the combination being 
known as 11, 70, 49, the knob E, (Fig. 1) is 
iurn.'d till the number 11 on the disk J corres- 



ponds with the index G' on the plate K. The 
knob E is then turned back till the number 71) 
on the disk I corresponds with the mark e of 
the washer j, on the same line with fcfie index 
G'. Then the knob is turned forward till the 
number 49, on the disk H, corresponds with 
the mark e' of the washer i. The key M is then 
inserted in the key-hole O', in the knob F, so 
that it will hold the arms 1, 2, 3 opposite the 
grooves w' , of the segment W, (Fig. 1) and the 
knob F is turned, withdrawing the bolt U. 

The setting of the numbers correctly brings 
the slots m' (Fig. 2) in the tumblers, into a 
line with the sliding plate r ' , so that as the knob 



Action of the Muley Saw- 
Hangings. 



-Anderson's 



That a third more execution can be ef- 
fected with at the same time a third less 
power, by the mere method of hanging the 
saw in the old-fashioned mill, appears 
somewhat incredible at first glance, but 
not so after comprehending what mechan- 
ical principles are involved, and how the 



which it will throw up with it the dust. As 
much power is required for this non-execut- 
ing, upward motion, as for the downward 
cut. All this wasted power is saved by the 
following ingenious yet very practicable 
method of throwing back the saw for every 
cut : 

The pitman, A, is not connected, as in 
the ordinary method, directly to the saw, 
B, but the buckle which connects the saw 
takes hold of the wrist within the fork of 




-VORBE'S COMBINATION LOCK— Seotional View. 



F is turned, and the bolt withdrawn, the plate 
r' enters the line of slots in the tumblers. But 
if the combination be incorrectly made, the 
slots m' will not all be in a proper line, and 
when the attempt is made to draw the bolt, the 
plate r ' strikes the edge of some one of the tum- 
blers, and releases the stop K' in the bolt U, 
which flies out, and makes it impossible to 
move the bolt (See Fig. 2.) It will then be 
necessary to pull down the little bolt d in the 
knob E, and turn the knob and the tumblers 
till the lug n, on the tumbler P, shall move the 
arm p, thus turning the arni W and the wheels 
Q, R, S, T, the last one, T, moving the lever Z, 
and pressing the stop R back into place. If a 
mistake be made a second time, the stop R' 
cannot be again forced back till the toothed 
wheel T has been turned half around, which 
would necessitate aiiout 50,000 turns of the 
knob E. 



same have been regarded to the best work- 
ing advantage by Mr. Anderson in his 
patent saw-hangings, below described. 
Concerning the justice of such a claim as 
the above, there is, at least, a large showing 
of very cordial and unqualified testimony; 
but persons interested may inform them- 
selves to their better satisfaction, on that 
point, through the agents of the Anderson 
patents, Messrs. Fuller & Co., No. 109 
Montgomery street. 

The common saw, hung without reason's 
adjustments, works to a great disadvantage 
in choking during the upward motion, as 
appears evident on watching the manner in 



MULEY SAW— ANDERSON'S HANGINGS. 



the upper end of pitman, A; the arms of 
the fork extending above the wrist to pivots 
working in the blocks that traverse the 
slides — thus making the j>itnian a lever 
having a, long and short arm. This arrange- 
ment compels the lower end of saw to 
be vibrated back and forth, as the lower 
end of pitman describes a circle. 

The "rake," or over-hang of the upper 
end of saw should always be in proportion 
to the feed carried, so that the saw will be- 
gin to cut the instant it begins to descend. 
In the ordinary upper muley, {when con- 
tinuous feed is used) the sawyer is obliged 
to put in rake enough for his heaviest feed. 
Being unable to change the rake, except 
with a stoppage of their mill and a loss of 
time, it is seldom changed, and a larger log 
t »■ i- [Continued on Page 12.] 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 3, 1869. 



Communications. 



Written for the Mining and Scientific Preps. 

Account of Reveille and Adjoining 
Districts. 

According to promise I will give you 
such a description of this interior mining 
district, as my observation, information, 
facts and figures will warrant. 
Discovery — 'Water. 

" Indian Jim " discovered this district in 
1866. The principal ledge and first dis- 
covery in Hot Creek already bore his name. 
As Moses led the Israelites from the wilder- 
ness, so Indian Jim led the bankrupt min- 
ers and millmen of Austin into this region 
of apparent mineral -wealth. The district 
■was organized October 2d, 1866. It is sit- 
uated on the west side of Eailroad Valley. 
110 miles south of Treasure Hill. It is a 
dry, burnt, desolate-looking place. A little 
water can be had by digging — perhaps 
enough can be concentrated in this manner 
to supply a 10-stamp mill. Tor milling 
purposes, however, there is an abundance 
of water 12 miles distant, on the opposite 
side of Hot Creek Valley. 

Alum, 
As we approached the camp from Twin 
Springs, the first object of interest that 
greeted our eyes was an alum bed or 
deposit — small knolls of vermillion-red 
color — separated by a small ravine. On the 
sides of the banks, underneath the red cap 
or shell, the alum seems to form in flakes 
or crusts, -which drop down. In quality, 
it is from purest crystal to a dirty brown 
earthy color. In the little ravine is a hole 
cut a foot deep, which contains perfectly 
pure clear alum water. Judging from the 
taste and " pncker " of the mouth it is as 
strong as a solution could be made with 
cold water. 

■ Fire Bricks or Bed Adobe?. 

We found three persons making large 
unburnt bricks out of this red earth. They 
have the appearance and hardness when 
dry of the ordinary fire brick, except a little 
coarser for the want of proper grinding 
and preparation of materials, and being a 
little darker colored — about the color of a 
common burnt brick. Mr. Nichols is using 
them in his assaying furnace, and they 
stand a white heat remarkably well. As to 
what use this red earth and alum may be, 
we leave for others who are more capable 
of judging to determine. 

The Mines 
Cover an area of about three by six miles 
—three mountains, known as North, South 
and Middle mountains, with depressions or 
sags between them. The manner in which 
they have been worked, would be a disgrace 
to their owners, if the circumstances under 
which they labored were not fully under- 
stood. The dosing up, abandonment and 
removal of twelve out of thirteen mills of 
Austin, and in like proportion in other in- 
terior localities, constructed in times of ex- 
citement by unintelligent and misdirected 
enterprise, disheartened capitalists from 
entering this remote field. The limestone 
formation of the district, against which 
there has been great prejudice, until since 
"White Pine has developed its wealth, in- 
creased the obstacles. The miners were 
poor while their mines were rich on the 
surface. They had confidence in their per- 
, manent future productions. They have 
lived here " from hand to month." They 
needed rich ore to pay §100 per ton for 
hauling, and $45 for reducing at Austin, 
and yet to have a margin for supplies. 
They " gutted " their mines under the law 
of necessity, and have left upon them the 
worst possible face for the eye of capital- 
ists. 

There is almost every variety of silver 
mines in the district, from the two rich 
streaks of chloride to the broad and well- 
defined quartz ledges. While the prevail- 
ing formation is lime rock, there are vast 
dykes or croppings of qnartzite, sometimes 
carrying in places more or less mineral, 
and in the neighborhood of which are 
found the best defined pay ledges. In other 
words, many of the mines show only pock- 
ets and streaks in the limestone, apparently 
without system or order, offering but little 
inducement or security for the investment 
of capital, while others show larger streaks 
and deposits with like irregularity, yet suf- 
ficient in magnitude to fairly justify the ex- 
penditure of money to follow their varia- 
tions and trace them, if possible, into de- 
fined ledges. The third class, however, — the 
large ledges of lower grade ore, — promises 
certain returns to those who shall invest 



their money. The " big strikes " will 
probably be made among the " deposits," 
but the surer fortune will come from the 
"hundred dollar rock." 

The "Fisherman," the most notorious 
mine, on the northwest side Of South 
Mountain, has been badly worked and 
wears a bad appearance. They cut into the 
ledge, scooped out about §15,000, and then 
run an incline straight away, down from 
the ledges, into solid limestone about thirty 
feet, then suspended work, leaving the 
ledge inclining upward from the top of the 
incline. There are large croppings at dif- 
ferent points on the supposed line of the 
ledge, to all appearances, as rich as where 
the first opening was made. While it is 
probable that there will be a vast amount 
of silver taken from this mine, still it re- 
quires money and goodmining to determine 
whether it is rich surface deposit or a per- 
manent true fissure vein. The surface rock 
will pay for regular and thorough develop- 
ment. But I prefer to rely upon statistics. 
A ton and a half crushed at Page's mill, 
Austin, worked at the rate of §1,632 per 
ton ; five tons at the Oiegon mill, worked 
§730 per ton; seventy tons in all averaged 
§400 per ton. One hundred and fifty tons 
on the dump worth §80 per ton. 

The " Park" mine on the Middle Mount- 
ain, is next in notoriety, and, like the 
"Fisherman," has been most slovenly 
worked, and finally left with but little or 
no pay ore in sight. Three lots of this ore 
shipped to Belmont, worked §780, §800 
and §1,482 per ton. It must have more 
work done to give it a paying or business as- 
pect. What has been said as to the ineffi- 
ciency or slovenly work in mining, applies 
to all the mines in the district. There is 
hardly one decent shaft, tunnel, or drift 
in the district, and yet there appears to be 
many rich ledges which have been a little 
opened. 

" Indian Queen," a large well marked 
ledge two feet wide, worked §175 per ton. 
" Faxon and Elms," a parallel lode of same 
width, has about the same quality of rock. 

The "Desert Queen" milled 7}£ tons of 
ore at Austin, paying §500 per ton. Twenty 
tons from " Davis" ledge, in different lots, 
worked from §240 to §362 per ton. " Au- 
rora" worked three tons, paying §224 per 
ton. "High Bridge" worked four tons, 
paying §387.50 per ton. 

Numerous lots from divers mines have 
been, worked at Austin, Hot Creek and 
Belmont within the last three years, rang- 
ing from §100 to §1,700 to the ton. There 
are 300 locations in the district, and there 
are probably fifty first class. 

In a district where all are yet subsisting 
on expectations, it is a delicate matter to 
specify particular mines and their owners, 
in the midst of so many apparently rich, 
yet undeveloped claims. Each believes he 
has got his everlasting fortune in abey- 
ance. 

From statistics collected from Austin, 
Belmont and Hot Creek mills, and from 
the resident miners, and from the general 
appearance of the lodes of all sizes, one is 
impressed with the belief that the three 
Reveille Mountains are almost fabulously 
rich in mineral wealth. 

The present holders who are too poor to 
develop, must let capital in on reasonable 
terms. The day has gone by for pros- 
pectors to make a fortune by the sale of an 
undeveloped |lode. From my intercourse 
with the holders of mines, I have no doubt 
but that they will make liberal; arrange- 
ments with moneyed men, who may desire 
to enter the field. There is apparently no 
place on the continent where capital can 
more safely make a moderate venture than 
in Reveille. A few thousand dollars judi- 
ciously and energetically expended on some 
one of the many large well defined ledges, 
would soon determine the question as to 
the wealth and permanent future of Re- 
veille. 

The " Buckeye" mill of Messrs. Lambert, 
Mason & Co., is now on the road, and will 
be ready for the reduction of ores in a few 
weeks. It may be hoped that it will give 
an impetus to an opening of the mines and 
aid to demonstrate the necessity for the 
construction of a railroad from Elko to the 
Colorado. I repeat that holders had better 
give away one-half of their mines to capi- 
talists for development, or sell at low fig- 
ures rather than to stay in camp living like 
badgers and waiting for companies to pay 
a great price, and take all the hazard of de- 
velopment beside. 

Milk Spring, Empire, Rattlesnake and 
Hot Creek districts are situated adjacent to 
and northwest of Reveille, and have the 
same general formation and much mineral 
wealth, all inviting capital and enterprise. 
Although I passed through these districts 
I have not time to speak of the several 
mines in detail; but all look hopeful for 
thefuture. Las Minaf. 



Familiar Science. 



Eetention of Water in Vegetables and 
Fruit. 

As nature places water in large quantities 
in vegetables and fruits, she also takes due 
precautions to keep it there. H we take 
from the earth unripe potatoes or remove 
unripe apples, pears, etc., from the stem; 
both wither, shrivel and become unsightly 
to the eye, and vapid to the taste. These 
effects result from the porous condition of 
the unripe skin, which permits the water 
to escape by evaporation. But if we allow 
the potato or fruit to remain until nature 
has completed her work, no such result en- 
sues, because, in the meantime, the porous 
covering of the skin has been changed to 
a very thin, but impervious coating, ap- 
proaching in character to the nature of 
cork, and through which no appreciable 
quantity of moisture can pass by evapora- 
tion. The vegetable or frnit is thus pro- 
vided with a covering which enables it to 
" keep" through the winter. The keeping 
quality of vegetables and fruit depends 
mainly upon the degree of impermeability 
of this outside covering. Atmospheric air, 
or rather the oxygen of the air, is the great 
corrosive or destructive agent which causes 
decomposition and decay of vegetable tis- 
sue. If the covering of the fruit or vege- 
table allows its juices to escape, the air will 
enter to take their place, and thus com- 
mence its work of destruction. 

While the fruit continues in a healthy 
state upon the twig, it is constantly pass- 
ing off large quantities of water, which is 
taken up by the roots of the tree, properly 
eliminated in the leaves, and a portion of 
the prepared fluid passed thence to the 
fruit, whence the useless watery particles 
escape to the atmosphere, leaving in the 
fruit only that which is needed to make up 
its bulk. Hence the necessity for a porous 
skin while the fruit is maturing, and an 
impervious covering to protect it when 
taken from the tree. 

Evaporation of Water from Vegetation. 

Few are aware of the enormous quanti- 
ties of water which are taken up through 
the roots into the organism of vegetables, 
and passed off thence into the atmosphere. 
An ordinary sun- flower is said to evaporate 
one and a quarter pints a day, and a cabbage 
about the same quantity. A single wheat 
plant is said to exhale about 1 % ounces of 
water each 24 hours; at which rate an acre 
of wheat will draw and pass about ten tons 
of water each day ! Some idea may be 
formed, from these statements, :>f the ne- 
cessity for a plentiful supply of water to 
the roots of plants, to ensure a vigorous 
growth. 

The sap of plants is the medium through 
which the fluid is conveyed. It is also the 
medium through which the mineral con- 
stituents are taken up from the soil and 
fertilizers employed, and distributed to 
the various tissues of theplant. This sap, 
in its progress from the roots to the leaves, 
and back again for its new supply of water 
and minerals, constitutes a delicate 
pulp, in which the watery particles flow 
along with almost the rapidity of a stream 
of water over the earth. By the action of 
this sap, and the modifying and chemical 
influences of the sun and air, various prop- 
erties may be communicated to the growing 
plant. These properties may be also more 
or less modified by the skill of man, as 
shown in our article in another column, on 
the ' ' Artificial Coloring of Plants." In that 
article we neglected to mention the fact 
timber, as well as flowers, may also be dyed 
various colors. A most notable instance of 
this is the black bamboo, of China. The 
Chinese possess the secret of coloring this 
plant a jet black. It is thus cultivated, 
however, only in the gardens of the wealthy, 
and for ornamental purposes. 

The strong food we eat creates a desire 
fcr muscular exertion. 



Wasting Fuel.— The blue flame ob- 
served at the chimney tops of our foun- 
dries and other furnace stacks, is caused by 
the combustion of escaping gases, which 
will burn only when mixed with air, which 
is conveyed to them after they leave the 
main body of the furnace fire. These 
flames do not extend down the chimney, 
but commence and burn only where they 
are seen — in the open air. Only a small 
part of the escaping gas is burnt at all; 
but passes away through the flame from the 
lack of the necessary degree of heat to light 
it. Such flames, as well as the thick vol- 
umes of smoke which often accompany 
them, indicate a very great waste of fuel — 
nearly all of which might be utilized by a 
proper construction of the furnace. From 
ten to fifteen per cent. , or more, of all the 
fuel employed on this coast for making 
steam is thus wasted, from the lack of 
either a little forethought or knowledge in 
the construction of furnaces and their flues. 



Why can we not count the posts on a 
fence when we are riding rapidly along on 
a rail car? Because the light from the 
posts falls upon the eye in such rapid suc- 
cession that time is not given the one to 
produce a perception of its presence before 
its image is effaced by the presence of an- 
other. Just as the string of a bow vibrates 
after it has been struck, so the vibration of 
the retina continues, and produces a per- 
ception of the presence of an object after 
the presence of the object has been with- 
drawn. The rapid presentation of objects 
so confuses or intermingles the vibrations 
that we lose their individuality. 

Gktjbs in the Nose. — The supposed 
' ' little grubs or moths " which are some- 
times pressed out of the nose, are simply 
little bodies of oil that have been secreted 
by the oil sacks which contain them, and, 
being retained in these sacks by their 
mouths having been kept closed by little 
specks of dirt or otherwise, have become 
harderJed, and, when squeezed out, appear 
like little white grubs. The remedy con- 
sists in keeping the skin in a healthy con- 
dition and the mouths of the oil sacs free 
from obstruction. 



The Soil. — To the majority of men the 
soil is nothing but dirt; but to the chemist 
who knows its origin, its nature and its 
capabilities, it is a wonderful mixture of 
those beautiful elements which in their 
ever-varying forms become the ambient 
air, the liquid ocean, the precious opal, the 
amethyst, and the still more precious dia- 
mond; or delicate blue-bell and violet, the 
amaranth, the lily, and the rose-bud; the 
spear of blue grass and the cedar of Leba- 
non ; or again, the ruby lip, the love-lit 
eye, the noble palpitating heart, and more 
wonderful brain. These are the jewels of 
which the soil is composed and out of 
which the husbandman strives to force the 
food hunger craves. Henceforth as he 
turns the furrows of the field, let the sleep 
of his thoughts be broken by the reflection 
that the earth thus turned up by the plow- 
share is doubtless composed in part of the 
ashes of ancestral heroes, whose deeds are 
the history of the past, and whose mortal 
remains are the plastic material out of 
which we are building the bodies of men 
to-day. 

Inequalities op the Ocean Level. — A 
work lately published at Cambridge, Eng- 
land, on the figure of the earth, gives, as a 
well established fact, that the water of the 
sea at the mouths of the Indus is elevated 
as much as 650 feet above that at Cape Co- 
morin, the southern extremity of Hindos- 
tan. The author, Rev. George Pratt, Arch- 
deacon of Calcutta, ascribes this difference 
of hight to the attractive influence of the 
Himalaya Mountains. 

Yellow envelope paper, after being 
lighted and the flame blown out, will con- 
tinue to burn until entirely consumed. 
White papers do not possess this property. 
Chemists allege that it is the coloring mat- 
ter which renders this kind of paper more 
combustible than other qualities. 

Remedy foe Cold Feet.— Cotton socks 
next the skin, and woolen socks outside of 
them, are represented as a sure preventive 
of cold feet. At night the cotton socks 
will be quite dry and the outside ones 
damp. 



July 3, 1869.] 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



Mechanical !Pro//ress. 



A New Form of Steel-Capped Rails. 

J. L. Booth of Rochester, N. Y. , some 
two years ago invented a method of 
giving iron rails a half-inch steel cap, 
which experienced railroad men think 
meets the requirements. The 7V, 
June 8d says: "Tho rail consists of an 
iron baso with a steel cap, united to the 
base not by bolts, screws; rivets or welding, 
bnt simply by clamping. Tho iron bar u 
rolled of the required form and weight, 
after which it is passed through the com- 
pressing machine, which clenches power- 
fully upon it the heavy steel cap. Thesub- 
Bequent action of weight upon it, as the 
passage over it of heavy trains, is to grip 
the iron more and moro tirmly, until the 
base and the cap become as firmly united 
as if they were a single piece of metal. 
Over the experimental rails laid dowu two 
years ago near the depot in Buffalo have 
passed 40,000 engines aDd 500,000 cars. 
The iron rails adjoining opposite them 
have, in the interval, been six times re- 
newed. No chaugo is as yet observablo in 
the steel-capped rails, and to all appearance 
they bid fair to wear out twenty successive 
Bots of the ordinary sort. 
Two of the rails were also laid on the N. Y. 
0. R. R-, at Rochester, N. Y., June 7, 18G7. 
On one, the cap was loose and even rat- 
tling; en tho other, it was firm. They were 
bud continuously, and with the old Btyle 
of chairs. They were placed where seventy 
engines and trains daily passed over them 
on the main liue, and where the track was 
used constantly for switching and making 
up of trains. The rate of speed over them 
varies. The through freight trains are fre- 
quently joined at this point, three or four 
in one, to ascend an up grade. They pass 
over these rails often at the rate of twenty- 
five or thirty miles an hour. The loose-cap 
rail became tight in a very short time, and 
both a're now in perfect order. Four sets 
of iron rails have been completely worn 
ont, and new sets replaced, on the oppo- 
site side of the track, during the period of 
time these duplex rails have been down." 

The effect of use upon this rail seems to 
be noticeably unlike that upon the rail with 
a welded steel cap. It will be remembered 
that with that, the rail and cap soon sepa- 
rated. 

The Iron Age of June 17th notices this 
invention at considerable length, pro- 
nounces it undoubtedly a success, and 
says ' ' there is reason to believe that it will 
be extensively adopted." It says also : 
" The force which holds the cap firmly 
upon its base is the process known by me- 
chanics as " peaning," and may be illus- 
trated by laying a straight bar of iron upon 
a curved surface, which will, by a succes- 
sion of light blows upon the upper surface, 
be thrown into a enrved form. This is a 
well-known effect, and we venture to say, 
there is no force of power employed in, or 
applicable to, the springing of an iron bar 
more effective. It is this "peaning " proc- 
ess that splits down the sides of the T 
rails, and not the weight of machinery." 

Artificial Stone— Oxalate or Lime. — 
At a recent meeting of the Polytechnic 
Association of the American Institute, 
Thomas Hodgson described two methods 
of preparing artificial stone, and exhibited 
specimens. One of these is prepared by 
treating lime with a solution of four ounces 
of oxalic acid in a gallon of water, thus 
producing an oxalate of lime, which is 
mixed with from two to four times its 
weight of sand. In this condition the ma- 
terial is a moist, friable powder. It is then 
molded to the required form in plaster of 
paris molds, removed from the latter, and 
suffered to dry. It is then preferably 
placed in a bath of dilute oxalic acid, 
which causes it to harden throughout, after 
which it is ready for use. In making the 
other variety, the inventor treats the oxa- 
late of lime with a solution of silicate of 
potash, thus bringing it to a semi-fluid 
condition, whereupon it is poured into 
molds and suffered to indurate. The cost 
would be about ten or fifteen per cent, 
greater than that of common plaster casts. 

In remarking upon this, Dr. Van der 
Weyde said that the idea was a lucky 
thought; for oxalate of lime is one of the 
most insoluble substances known. 



Boiler Flues. — Tho transverse section 
of a Hue should be a circle. Nevertheless, 
the longitudinal joints are generally lapped. 
Suoh a departure from the true circle, con- 
siderably lessens the power of resistance. 
The loss of strength has been ascertained 
to be nearly one-third. The joint should 
be a bull joint, with longitudinal covering 
plates. Mr. Henderson say s the cylindrical 
form is the only one to be relied on in any 
construction where tubes have to sustain an 
external pressure. 

New Steam Pump. — Tho London Mining 
Journal describes a pump lately brought 
forward, as of remarkable simplicity : 
" There are only two moving parts in the 
engine — a piston, with a cylindrical slide- 
valve within it, actuated directly by the 
steam, by the main piston passing over 
certain ports or openings in the steam cyl- 
inder, the valve moving in the opposite 
direction to that of the piston. The en- 
gine (with its 6team piston and slide-valve, 
self-contained within the cylinder) isbolted 
upon the cover of the pump-barrel. The 
only moving part visible is about a couple 
of inches of piston-rod, which, of course, 
could be oased in if required. Were it not 
for seeing the piston-rod gliding backwards 
and forwards through the stuffing-boxes, 
no one would suppose the machine to be 
at work, its action is so noiseless. The en- 
gine has neither fly-wheel, crank-shaft, 
bearings, eccentrics, connecting-rod, pins, 
joints, tappets, springs, nor small valves to 
regulate the action of the steam. It can 
be worked at an extremely slow rate of 
speed, below ten strokes per minute, by 
simply regulating the admission of steam 
to the cylinder." 

Tungsten Steel. — M. Leguen, who has 
been experimenting at intervals for two or 
three years, has lately, by the use of good 
white cast iron in place of the gray pig be- 
fore used, produced tungsten steel of ex- 
cellent quality. A portion of the iron is 
first alloyed with one-tenth wolfram , in a 
cupola furnace, and is added to the rest in 
the converter. The conversion is carried 
further than usual, so that the carbon is 
reduced to one-half the ordinary propor- 
tion. The steel so produced is soft, but 
very tough, and tempers remarkably well. 
M. Leguen mentions that it will be found 
extremely useful for machines, some parts 
of which require to be tempered, while 
others are kept soft. The objection brought 
against this alloy is that it is expensive, 
but the amount of tungsten employed by 
M. Leguen is so small — only 0.55 per 
cent. — that it can make but a very small 
addition to the cost of the steel. — Mechan- 
ics' Magazine. 

Area of Safety Valves. — The size of 
the orifice in safety valves may be deter- 
mined by the following rule : Let the re- 
quired area of the valve equal, in square 
inches, from l-25th tol-30th of the number 
of pounds of coal burned per hour. This 
rule is applicable to boilers in which the 
weight of water actually evaporated per 
pound of coal is about six pounds; conse- 
quently we may Btate it thus : the said area 
in square inches equals from l-150th to 
l-180th of the water actually evaporated 
per hour. — Am. Artisan. 

Wateb-eoom and Steam-eoom. — Ac- 
cording to Bourne, of the whole boiler- 
room, or internal capacity of the boiler, 
there are very nearly % water- room, and % 
steam-room; according to Robert Arm- 
strong, there are % water-room and y, 
steam-room ; and that author considers that 
with a less proportion of steam-room, there 
is risk of priming, or carrying over liquid 
water from the boiler to the cylinder. — 
Artisan. 



Scale in Boilers. — If the water con- 
tains bicarbonate of lime, this is decom- 
posed by the heat and the carbonate is pre- 
cipitated. Sal-ammoniac is recommended 
for preventing the precipitation of lime by 
forming soluble chloride of calcium. This 
is used in Holland for locomotives. Car- 
bonate of soda is recommended as an effect- 
ual means of preventing scale from water 
containing either carbonate or sulphate of 
lime. 



Nominal Horse-power of Boilers. — 
The following is a rule, founded on the best 
practice : Take a mean proportional be- 
tween the area of fire-grate in square feet 
and the area of effective heating surface in 
square yards. The nominal horse-power of 
the boiler is generally much less than the 
indicated horse-power of the engine, to 
which it bears no fixed proportion. — Am. 
Artisan. 



Scientific jProff?-ess. 



Source of Light in Flame. 

As proof that light in gas and candle 
flame is not due to incandescent particles 
of carbon, but to radiation from dense but 
transparent hydro-carbon vapors. Prof. 
Franklnnd showed that mixtures of hydro- 
gen and carbonic oxide with oxygen emit 
but little light when they are burnt or ex- 
ploded in free air, but exhibit intense lu- 
minosity when exploded in closed glass 
vessels, so as to prevent their expansion at 
the moment of combustion. 

Again : — The denser the gas through 
which tho electric spark is passed, the 
greater the amount of light emitted. The 
intensity of the light is very great in chlo- 
rine and sulphurous anhydride, and very 
slight in hydrogen. On passing a stream 
of induction sparks through the gas stand- 
ing over liquefied sulphurous anhydride in 
a strong tube, at the ordinary temperature, 
when a pressure of about three atmos- 
pheres was exerted by the gas, a very bril- 
liant light was obtained. A stream of in- 
duction sparks was passed through air con- 
fined in a glass tube connected with a con- 
densing syringe, and the pressure of the 
air being then augmented to two or three 
atmospheres, a very marked increase in the 
luminosity of the sparks was observed, 
whilst on allowing the condensed air to es- 
cape, the same phenomena were observed 
in the reverse order. 

Prof. F. closes his argument thus :— 
" The necessity of solid particles has been 
disproved. A closer examination into the 
evidence of their existence farther confirms 
our position. Soot from a gas-flame is not 
elementary carbon, it always contains hy- 
drogen. The transparency of the luminous 
portion of flame tends to negative the idea 
of solid particles. The continuous spec- 
trum of gas and candle-flames does not re- 
quire the assumption of solid particles. 
The spectra of the flames of carbonic oxide 
in air, of carbonic disulphide, arsenic, and 
phosphorus in oxygen, are continuous, 
and so, as we have seen, is that of hydrogen 
burning in oxygen under a pressure of ten 
atmospheres. It is to the behavior of hy- 
dro-carbons under the influence of heat that 
we must look for the source of luminosity 
in a gas flame. These gradually lose hy- 
drogen, whilst their carbon atoms coalesce 
to form compounds of greater complexity, 
and, consequently, of greater vapor den- 
sity." 

Dr. Winslow's New System. — C. F. 
Winslow, M. D., has published a book en- 
titled "Force and Nature," which is said 
to be likely to attract a good deal of atten- 
tion among speculative scientists. We 
have not yet seen it, and defer special men- 
tion to a future issue. Meanwhile we may 
mention that it takes the ground that repul- 
sion " is just as much a force as attraction; 
cognate in origin, equal in value, quantity 
and extent with that of gravitation, and go- 
ing hand in hand inseparably with it into 
atoms and into masses," and throughout 
infinite expansions into the dynamics of 
celestial motion ; and playing an equal part 
also with attraction as a primary agent in 
the production of all physical, organic, and 
vital phenomena. " 

Liquefaction of Gases by Pressure. — 
This was exhibited by Mr. Ladd at the 
Royal Institution in the following manner: 
Three glass tubes, open at the bottom, con- 
taining cyanogen, sulphurous acid, and 
ammonia in their upper parts, and filled 
with mercury below, are inclosed in a strong 
glass cylinder filled with water. At the 
top of the cylinder is a small force-pump, 
which, when worked, drives more water 
into the cylinder, and forces the mercury, 
which acts as a piston, up the tubes. As 
the mercury rises the gases are condensed, 
and now appear as liquids at the top. 
When the pressure is reduced by opening 
a stop-cock the liquids boil, and the gases 
speedily resume their normal dimensions. 



Ancient Human Remains in Pennsyl- 
vania and New York. 

In the last issue of the Proceedings of the 
Natural History Society, W. H. Niles thus 
describes certain traces of an ancient race 
found in the Pennsylvania oil region: "Ar- 
tificial excavations or oblong pits are to be 
found in considerable numbers in sections 
of the Oil Creek valley. Sometimes the 
seotions thus marked embrace hundreds 
of acres in extent. The pits are from 
four by six to six by eight feet in size, and 
although much filled by natural accumu- 
lations, are frequently from four to six feet 
in depth. Some of the larger ones were 
curbed with timbers. The bark was re- 
moved, and it is stated that sometimes the 
timbers were halved and rudely adjusted at 
the corners. In one instance, while exca- 
vating preparatory to the [construction of a 
sawmill, some workmen came upon one of 
these pits where the timbers were twelve 
feet in length, and placed perpendicularly 
upon end. It is also s'a'ed that in some of 
these wells there have been found logs with 
notches cut in them, which may have 
served as steps for the ascent and descent 
of those who constructed and used them. 

Such works are not found beyond the 
limits of what is known as the oil region, 
and that they are excavated for the purpose 
of obtaining petroleum, there scarcely can 
be a doubt. That petroleum was obtained 
is evident from the fact that the timbers 
used are thoroughly impregnated with it, 
and by it preserved in a good state of sound- 
ness, and frequently are almost free from 
decay. " 

From the trees growing thereon, and 
other indications, Mr. Niles concludes that 
these works must be referred to the time of 
the ancient copper miners of the Lake Su- 
perior region, and of the mound-builders 
of the West. 

The same report gives the]conclusions ar- 
rived at by Mr. Henry Mc'Guier, who noted 
the developments made in the cleaning out 
of the High Rock Spring, in Saratoga 
County, N. Y., in 1865. The different 
layers of muck and tufa overlying an an- 
cient fireplace, with charcoal and other 
marks of the action of fire, must have re- 
quired for their deposition, — Mr. Mo'G. 
thinks, — some 5,500 years. 

Chemical Action Arrested by Pressure. 
At a recent meeting of the Polytechnic As- 
sociation of the American Institute, the 
above named subject was brought up. Mr. 
Phin, — after reading the statement, to 
which we have alluded in a former issue, 
to the effect that Cailletet has found that 
acids cease to disengage hydrogen in the 
presence of zinc, etc. , if subjected to strong 
pressure, — remarked thatin his opinion, M. 
Cailletet had deceived himself in the mat- 
ter; that he had himself often prepared hy- 
drogen by the action of acid on zinc under 
pressure of, say, ten atmospheres, and that 
others had done the same under much 
greater pressure. He added : " When op- 
erating in glass vessels we are apt to de- 
ceive ourselves from the fact that the press- 
ure causes the bubbles of gas to diminish 
in size, and we are apt to suppose that no 
action is going on; when, in reality, gas is 
being produced at a very rapid rate. " 

State Geological SuRVEYa — The U. S. 
Railroad and Mining Register gives a memo- 
randum of the present condition of the 
various State Surveys. Of Ohio, Michigan, 
Indiana, Hlinois, Iowa, Missouri, Tennes- 
see, North Carolina, New Hampshire, and 
New York, progress is noted; but the writer 
mournfully exclaims, " Alas for Pennsyl- 
vania I No cabinet ; no survey ; no record 
office ; no mining bureau ; nothing !" 

What shall we say of California? 

A New Arum. — Specimens have recently 
been forwarded to England, of a gigantic 
Nicaraguan plant, closely allied to the 
Arums, which has heretofore escaped the 
notice of traveling botanists. It produces 
but one leaf, nearly 14 feet in length, sup- 
ported by a stalk 10 feet long. The stem 
of the flower is a foot in circumference, 
the spathe or flower is two feet long, pur- 
plish blue in color, with a powerful car- 
rion-like odor. 



4 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 3, 1869. 



|m(min# and fl^ntynittjg. 



Cultivation and Utilization of Oats. 

Oats, as well as wheat and other cereals, 
were undoubtedly derived, originally, from 
wild grasses, and owe their present per- 
fection solely to care and cultivation. They 
are much more recent in their introduc- 
tion than wheat or barley. We find no 
mention of oats until about the commence- 
ment of the Christian Era; although we 
learn from Scripture that Solomon fed his 
horses on barley. Caligula fed his favorite 
horse on ' ' gilded oats out of a golden cup, " 
from which circumstance we may reason- 
ably infer that the grain was then very 
scarce and dear; probably just coming into 
cultivation. 

The advantages derived from the culti- 
vation of oats, arise chiefly from the fact 
that they are more easily raised in cold 
and wet climates than any other grain; 
probably because, as the seeds approach 
maturity, theyassume a pendant position, al- 
lowing the sporules of fungi, or the ovules 
of larvae to be easily washed off by the rain, 
or shaken off by the wind. The scattered 
position of the seeds also allows of a more 
free access to the ripening and fructifying 
influence of sunlight and air. Oats when 
allowed to run wild rapidly deteriorate; or 
rather ^more readily fall back into their 
natural state than either wheat or barley. 

The disadvantages attending the culti- 
vation of this grain are due to the fact that 
the nutritive substance is generally less in 
a given weight, and to the acre, than in any 
other cereal, although the gross weight of 
seed may be larger. Moreover, the com- 
position of oats is more liable to variations 
than other grains, so that the feeding value 
is not constant or reliable. Climate, soil, 
seed, manure, etc., appear to affect the 
character of oats more than other grains. 
Some kinds are fully one-third more nutri- 
tive than others. 

The chemical and nutritive character 
of all the various grains have been much 
studied of late years; and from such ex- 
amination it appears that none but the best 
quality of oats will bear a favorable com- 
parison with the other grains. The oat, 
when properly selected and cultivated, is 
rich in non-nitrogenized substances, such as 
go to keep up animal heat and form fat, 
and in that respect it is valuable for fatten- 
ing animals; but this condition is present in 
excess, only when the grain is of a superior 
quality. The proportion of nitrogenized 
or flesh-forming substances is also greatly 
dependent on cultivation ; and in good oats 
is larger than in either wheat, barley, corn, 
rye or buckwheat. 

The inference from the above is that oats 
should never be raised for grain feed, ex- 
cept when the utmost care can be taken in 
the entire cultivation of the plant. Hence 
greater advantages may be derived from 
" drilling in" oats, than other kinds of 
grain. Among the advantages of drilling 
we may mention the economizing in the 
quantity of seed; the giving of the grain 
more air and sunlight, and the covering of 
the seed more uniformly in depth. No 
grain is more dependent on cultivation than 
the oat. 

We have said that oats, when properly 
cultivated, are superior for their flesh or 
muscle-forming properties — a very import- 
ant consideration in working animals. The 
leaf and stem of this plant also contains a 
much larger portion of flesh-forming ma- 
terial than the same parts of any of the other 
cereals. It is to this fact that our Cali- 
fornia wild oats owe their superiority when 
used for hay. 

Oats are also more improved in their nu- 
tritious qualities for animals, by grinding, 
than other grains; for the reason that they 
require more mastication. Horses, espe- 
cially; when put to feed, after working 
hard, will not take time to masticate their 



food; hence this work should be partially 
dpne by machinery. Careful experiments 
show a saving of fully one-third from 
grinding. When grain goes into thestom- 
aeh in a whole state, it is worse than lost, 
because not only no nourishment is de- 
rived from it; but it also works a positive 
injury to the system. 

The varieties of oats now most commonly 
cultivated and approved in the Eastern 
States are the New Brunswick, a valuable 
white oat (newly introduced) , the Surprise, 
noticed by us last week, the black Swedish, 
lately introduced through the Agricultural 
Bureau, and the Excelsior, a new English 
oat, remarkable for its plumpness and 
yield. All of these "belong to the common 
oat species. Then we have the Tartarian 
varieties, such as the Potatoe, the Hunga- 
rian, and the Siberian. These are gener- 
ally considered inferior to those first 
named. We have also the Naked oats, 
Avena mida, and the Chinese, two recently 
introduced varieties, quite similar in char- 
acter, and which are highly spoken of. In 
addition to those mentioned there are not 
less than seventy others, known to bot- 
anists. 

With regard to the Norway oats to which 
allusion was made last week, we are in 
doubt. Our impression is that their pop- 
ularity is more apparent than real, and is 
due to the extensive and persistent plan 
adopted for their advertisement to the pub- 
lic, rather than to their intrinsic merits. 
The result of some of the experiments 
made have been quite unsatisfactory, while 
in some cases excellent reports are re- 
turned. Some spurious seed has also no 
doubt been sold. It is possible that the 
diverse results may be due to certain pe- 
culiarities in this plant, which we will en- 
deavor to notice next week. 



Horticulture in Greenland. 

In the furtherest northern limits of cul- 
tivation, as in Southern Greenland, Ice- 
land, etc., there are barely two months of 
Summer during which what cultivation is 
carried on, must be conducted with the 
greatest care. Naturally, culture in those 
regions can produce neither fruits, seeds 
or trees; but vegetables, furnishing leaves 
only, do passably well. Badishes do well, 
so do cabbages, which, however, do not 
form heads, spinnach, salads, etc. The 
flavor, however, even of such growths, is 
quite inferior. Potatoes will only grow to 
the size of hazlenuts. Manure has very 
little effect upon the growth of vegetation ; 
because the warmth of the sun is not suffi- 
cient or does not continue long enough to 
decompose it. The only way in which or- 
dinary manures can be employed is to ex- 
pose them to the action of the weather for 
several years, when they become suffi- 
ciently decomposed to be of some service 
in the garden. To produce even the vege- 
tables named, seeds must be first started in 
hot houses. The ground, even in the most 
southern part of Greenland, continues fro- 
zen the year round to within a few inches 
of the surface. The utmost northern limit 
of trees passes through the southernmost 
part of Greenland, and on this coast just 
to the north of Behring's Straits. The 
thermal lines of Kodiak and our Alaskan 
peninsula correspond with those of the 
northern limits of Canada and New Bruns- 
wick. Still there is less ice along the 
coast of our northwestern promontories 
than on the coast of New England. 

Large Tkee Near Santa Cbuz. — There 
is a redwood tree near Burk's Eureka mill, 
Santa Cruz County, that is 26 feet in diam- 
eter, 65 feet to the first limb, and is more 
than 200 feet high. It is a well-propor- 
tioned tree, round and not deformed. 



A Stuffed Cat placed upon strawberry 
beds, is said to be an effectual means to 
drive away the birds. If so, why will not 
the same device keep the birds from cherry 
trees, 'the experiment might be easily 
tried. 



Artificial Coloring of Plants. 

Plants derive the whole of their mineral 
matter from the soil, as well as an import- 
ant portion of that which is combustible 
(their carbon). The water which moistens 
the soil, takes into solution these mineral 
matters, and from the rootlets, where it is 
first received, passes it up through the 
trunk and stem into the leaves, (the lungs 
of the plant) where it is further elaborated 
by the action of the sun and air. 

This part of the process is a chemical 
work, and to it is due the color of the 
plant. There can be no color, but white, 
without the aid of the sun or some artificial 
light. Different chemicals may be made 
to produce, by the aid of the sun, different 
colors. Charcoal powder darkens and en- 
riches the flowers of the dahlia, the rose, 
the petunia, etc. Carbonate of soda red- 
dens the hyacinth, and super-phosphate of 
soda alters in various ways the hues of 
other plants. 

Some few years since, one of the hands 
employed in the paint factory of Mayor 
Tieman, at Manhattanville, N. Y. , having 
thrown some liquid green paint of a par- 
ticular kind on a flower-bed occupied by 
white anemones, the flowers subsequently 
made their appearance with petals as green 
as grass. The paint had in it a peculiar and 
very penetrating chemical mixture, which 
Mr. Tieman has since applied, with other 
colors, to various plants, annual, biennial, 
andof the shrub kind — the result beinginva- 
riably that the flowers so watered took the 
hue of the liquid deposited at their roots. 

The circumstance which originally led to 
the discovery of this interesting class of 
facts was due to the experiment of an En- 
glish horticulturist who once covered with 
pulverized charcoal the ground around the 
roots of a rose bush, the flowers of which 
were of a faded and uninviting hue. He 
was surprissed to see the color of the 
flowers, as they successively came out, 
gradually change to a lively rose color. He 
tried the same upon his petunias, aud the 
white colored flowers become beautifully 
veined with violet tints; while violets to 
which he applied the charcoal, become cov- 
ered with irregular spots of a bluish or 
almost black tint. It is a singular fact, 
however, or at least it has been stated as 
such, that yellow flowers appear to be in- 
sensible to the action of charcoal. 

It is thus that science and observation 
has enabled the horticulturist to control, to 
a greater or less extent, the color and char- 
acter of the most beautiful productions of 
nature. As the dyer prepares the chemical 
ingredients into which he dips his stuffs, 
to give them the desired color, so the hor- 
ticulturist may now place about the roots 
of his favorite plants the peculiar chemi- 
cal, so prepared and mixed, as to produce 
the new color which he desires should be 
imparted to its leaves and petals. Thus it 
appears that we may yet be able to " paint 
the lily," which Solomon, in all his glory, 
considered entirely beyond the power of 
man. The wonders of science, great and 
varied as they have already become, are as 
yet but just beginning to dawn upon us. 

Something New fob Gkeens. — The Alia 
says that an English gardener, fond of 
pumpkins, tried some of the young, just- 
formed fruit for greens, and found it ex- 
cellent. He cuts the tender shoots and 
cooks them with pepper, salt and butter, 
chops them up fine, and serves like other 
greens. They are commended to epicures 
for their brilliant color, delicate aroma and 
grateful flavor. Our cotemporary suggests 
that some one should try this new candidate 
for table honors and report thereon. 

Crystalizing Flowebs. — This is done 
by suspending or repeatedly dipping them 
in water saturated with alum. This, how- 
ever, can only be done with dried speci- 
mens. The freshness and beauty of flow- 
ers can be preserved by dipping them in 
glycerine. 



Fire in the Geain Fields. — The Cas- 
troville Argus, of June 26th, says that on 
the Thursday previous a destructive fire 
broke out in the grain field on El Alisal 
Bancho, about two from miles from Nativi- 
dad, by which some 300 acres were burned 
over and 100 sacks of thrashed grain 
spoiled. The fire originated from sparks 
that fell from the chimney of a steam 
thresher. 

The editor of the Argus expresses the 
hope that some plan will be found by 
which the falling of sparks in grain fields 
may be avoided, so that our farmers may 
to the fullest extent reap the reward of 
their faithful toil. We would refer the 
Argus to the notice of Mr. Bowker's " Im- 
proved Locomotive Smoke Stack," which 
will be found under the head of "New 
Inventions" for the present week. 

Deformed Cattle— Interesting Phys- 
iolgioal Fact.— The Walla Walla (W.T.) 
Statesman says: The people in the vicinity 
of Spaulding's, on theTouchet, are having 
something new in the annals of stock rais- 
ing. A farmer from that section informs 
us that fifteen out of twenty of the calves 
born there this spring have either been so 
badly deformed that they died at birth, or 
it was necessary to kill them to put them 
out of misery. In one instance there was 
only one perfectly formed calf out of thir- 
teen, and in another only one out of six. 
The farmers there believe Jhey have dis- 
covered the cause of this singular freak of 
nature in the fact that only cows that range 
in the vicinity of, and licked at, certain 
banks, supposed to be impregnated with 
alum, have deformed calves. The residents 
there are preparing to fence these banks, 
or licks, and thus in future avoid the mis- 
fortune that has befallen them this season. 

Who Owns the Fruit of Overhanging 
Limbs. — Judicial decisions have established 
the principle that if a tree growing upon 
the ground of one party overhangs that of 
another, the party owning the tree can entf i 
upon the ground of his neighbor and 
gather his fruit, provided he does no dam- 
age beyond that necessary for such an act. 
On the other hand, the neighbor has the 
right to cut off all the limbs that overhang 
his land, and remove all roots that perme- 
ate his soil; but although he may permit 
them to grow, he has no right to enjoy the 
benefit of their fruit. 



Foue O'clooks. — Mr. Williams, of the 
firm of Williams & Ede, of this city, sends, 
us word that he has planted some Eastern 
seeds of this flowering plant, and finds to 
his surprise that in California soil it forms 
bulbous roots, and becomes perennial. 
Some members of this family in the tropics 
often become shrubs or trees; but we were 
not aware that they ever formed bulbous 
roots. 

Bovine Hybbed. — W. H. Kelly, a Big 
Biver merchant, has a cow that has given 
birth to an elk calf. He obtained the cow 
from a hunter in that vicinity. Several 
persons have seen the funny stranger, and 
report it elkish in manner but calfish in 
taste. 



Wheat and Phosphorus. — When a 
wheat crop of 25 bushels is harvested from 
an acre, there are removed 20 pounds of 
phosphoric acid and 30 pounds of potash. 
If these are not restored by some form of 
manure, the field will not continue to pro- 
duce 25 bushels to the acre. 

The Saving of Machinery. — It is said 
that the threshing machines used in the 
United States save 10,000,000 bushels of 
grain annually more than the flail would 
save. 



Scarcity of Habvest Hands. — It is said 
that there is a scarcity of harvest hands in 
some localities. In the vicinity of "Hay- 
ward's" farmers have been forced, against 
their wishes, to employ Chinamen, as 
without them, they would lose their crops. 

Sitka cbanbeebies have made their ap- 
pearance in this market — 100 barrels hav- 
ing arrived last week. The fruit is very 
fine, much better than the Oregon berry. 
It is said that any quantity can be obtained 
from Kodiac. 



July 3, 1869.] 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



Slock iReview. 



Weekly Stock Circular. 

By Allocated BrokirsoftheS. T. Stock and Exchange Boird 

Six Frakcisco, July 3, 1609. 
Financial. 

AlthouRh oar local money market remains stringent, 
there are strong Indications of an early release from the 
pressure. In the Ravings and Loan institutions the de- 
posits exc.-ed the withdrawals. Indicating a less active 
demand for cash, and a wholesome thrift. However 
severe may have been the ordeal lYom which we are just 
emerging. It has been literally nothing compared to that 
suffered by New York when as high as GO per cent, per 
annum was paid for money, nor are their dlluculties yet 
surmounted. Treasure shipments to a large extent are 
now made by railroad Instead of steamer to New York, 
the rate being 1 '\ per cent., Insurance Included. 

The real estate transactions for the pam six months of 
1869 have been largely in excess of those for the year 
preceding. Carter's Real Estate- Circular has the follow- 
ing figures for the first six months of the past four years: 
Number of sales so for for the current year, 4,015 ; value, 
$21,001,074. Number same time last year, 3,477 ; value, 
$13,830,430. Number In 1807, 2,895 ; value, $8,985,019. 
Number in 1806, 2,590; value, $7,634,759. While- the 
value of the sales for 1867 only Increased $1,350,260, the 
Increase of 1869 over 1868 amounts to $7,171,238. The 
mortgages for June numbered 293, valued at $1,305,942, 
and the relSMM wen 139, valued at $419,795. 

Tbe Export* of Treasure from Juno 1st to date, have 
been as follows: 

Total since Jane l«t. 1869 f3.6M.224 02 

previously tbia/esi ia.ku IM fw 

Overland since May 8— to New York 1,411,611 »5 

Total since January Int. 1869 811,046,229 95 

Corresponding period, 1868 19.937,491 65 



$7 84 per ton, and 32,839 tons at the Bock Point mill, 
$7 60% per ton. Tho expenses of hauling ore from tbe 
mine are included in the above. The cost of extracting 
40,975 tons, including drifting, repairs, etc., amounted 
to $4 78% per ton. 

The following is a statement showing the disburse- 
ments and receipts of the Company, from the datu of its 
going into operation to May 31, 1869 : 

lusncnsEwccrs. 
For expenditures for milling and mining pur- 
poses, including rn w machinery and im- 
provements $3,813,773 SI 

General expense account, forsuudrivsand legal 

expenses 288,031 11 

Assaying 37,558 72 

Expenses in San Francisco 69.0H7 51 

Intorost 111,217 71 

Premium and discount 29.017 81 

Treasure freight 30.230 67 

Federal tax, paid to Assayer. 18.396 91 

Dividends 1,067.500 00 

Assets- 
Book accounts $3.00,1 ,16 

Office ititures 1.174 57 

Cash on hand 7.680 16 



11,860 28 



$>>,36. ; >,704 03 
RECEIPTS. 
Mines and Mills- 
Receipts from ores and sundries sold for ac- 
count of mines and mills $5,119,374 72 



Interest and rents. . 

By proceeds from outside ores 

San Francisco office 

General expense 

Property sold 

Premium and discount 

Federal tax, returned by Assayer.. 

Gold Hill Draining Compauy 

Assessments 

Imperial engine shaft 



2,788 

4S,H-iH fiO 

At HI Hi> 

1.309 73 

1.313 75 

33.K-2!) 47 

406 26 

2.284 43 

150.000 00 

5,053 28 



$5,365,704 03 

Tho available assets of tho Company, In supplies, con- 
sist of timber, lagging, wood, castings, quicksilver, 
chemicals, etc, and for account as follows : 

Gold Bill mill $3,398 80 

Alta mino 1,584 88 

Rock Point mill 5,904 04 

Imperial-Empire shaft 1,724 81 



Increase this year $1,108,738 30 

City Stocks. 
During the past week the open market for miscellane- 
ous shares has not been active. We note Bales of Spring 
Valley Water stock at $04 60 per share. Of San Fran- 
cisco Gas stock, 130 shares realized $80 25 per share. 
The usual monthly dividend of this Company is payable 

eince the 1st Inst. The July dividend of tho Pacific 

Bank is announced. The stockholders of the San 

Francisco Insurance Company will receive a portion of 

the assets of said Company, on and after the 1st inst. 

The July dividend of the North Beach and Mission Bail- 

road is now payable. The Merchants' Mutual Marine 

Insurance Company, and the Spring Valley Water Com- 
pany, disburse their usual dividends on the 10th. 

Mini mis Share Marlcet. 

The mining share market has been tolerably active 
during the period under review, and the stock list of tho 
Board participated quite generally. Prices have been 
well maintained, though wc do not note any very mate- 
rial advance or decline. Larger sales than usual have 
been made of White Pine stocks, a dozen companies 
comprising the sale llet. 

The Board adjourned from Friday afternoon, July 2d, 
to Wednesday morning, July 7th— allowing all a general 
holiday. 

Imperial — is in light request. From the annual 
report for the fiscal year ending May 31, 1809, we make 
the following extracts. With regard to the operations in 
the Imperial-Empire shaft, the Superintendent says : 

In August last, sinking was resumed in the Imperial- 
Empire shaft, and in January of the present year the 
shaft had attained a depth of 1,100 feet, since which time 
stations have been opened on the 1,000 and 1,100 levels. 
On the 1,000 level a drift was run to the vein, a distance 
of 90 feet, where the vein was found to contain only 
barren quartz. This drift has been continued west into 
the vein 75 feet, without any better result ; also, a side 
drift has been run north 60 feet, from which point a 
cross-cut has been run east 60 feet to the clay-wall — 
■which cross-cut did not develop anything but barren 
quartz. On the 1,100 level, we found the east wall at a 
distance of 15 feet from the shaft. A drift on this level 
has been run 150 feet west into the vein, which contains 
only porphyry. On this level we are running a drift 
south to the Holmes mine, a distance of 248 feet from 
this shaft. This drift is now 75 feet south of shaft. The 
nummary of work done in this mine for the year past, 
has been the sinking of 225 feet of shaft, and the running 
of 750 lineal feet of drifts. 

From the Secretary's report we take the following re- 
capitulation of the receipts and disbursements from May 
31, 1868, to May 31, 1869 : 

BECEIPTS. 

For Alts mine $593,032 52 

" Hoi mes mi ne 25,775 07 

Rock Point mill 10.10194 



Gold Hill mill.. 

Premi urn 

Discount 

Lindaur mill 

General expense 

Imperial -Empire shaft . 
Assessment No. 2 



For book accounts, per report May 31. 

1SK8 

** Office fixtures 

11 Cash on hand May 31, 1863 



3,183 58 

5.683 51 

159 91 

861 95 

424 50 

1.511 72 

100,000 00 

P 255 06 
1.174 56 
82,962 51 



$740,634 70 



DISBURSEMENTS. 
For Rock Point dam and mill repairs. $ 11,448 81 

" General expense 21,478 03 

" RockPointmill 26B.3H0 03 

" GoldHillmill 99.872 16 

" Expenses in San Francisco 9.021 77 

" Imperial new drifts 20,162 84 

" Alta mine 211,706 01 

'■ Holmeamine 6.10108 

" Legal expense 4,720 76 

" Discount 3,760 56 

" Assaying. 4,471 13 

*' Treasure freight 1.793 29 

" Dividend 24,000 00 

" Interest 1,018 37 

" Imperial-Empire shaft 78,220 78 



$12,612 53 
Tho only outstanding liability of this Company is 
$27,000, being balance of subscription (530,000) to Vir- 
ginia and Truckce Railroad, payable in equal monthly 
Installments of $3,000. 

The officers for the ensuing year are as follows : A. K. 
P. Harmon, (President) Thomas Bell, (Vice-President) 
Thomas Sunderland, A. Hay ward, James Freeborn, Rob- 
ert Sherwood and Joseph Barron. D. A. Jennings was 
appointed Secretary. 

Hale & Norcross — exhibited about the usual activity, 
showing better prices at the cloBe. On the 29th of June, 
$25,686 in buUion came to hand. During the week end- 
ing June 29th, the upper mine yielded 121%, and the 
lower mine yielded 1,269 tons of ore, 709}$ tons coming 
from the fifth station level. In the same time, 1,106% 
tons were delivered for reduction, leaving 1,505 tons on 
hand. 

Chollab-Potosi — is in better request, at improved 
rates. The week ending June 25th shows an ore yield of 
1,830 tons, from the following localities: Blue Wing, 830; 
New Tunnel, 810, and Croppings, 190 tons, The general 
condition of this mine is very good. On the 21st ult. 
they connected the 1,100 station with the Hale & Nor- 
cross 1,030 level, giving a fine draught of air for working 
purposes. At the 500 station the face of the drift is in 
clay and porphyry, with a gradual increase of water. On 
June 30th, $18,116 in bullion came to hand. 

Gould & Curry — obtained slightly improved prices 
over last week's sales. On the 29th of June, $14,329 in 
bullion was received at the office in this city, and for the 
month of June the aggregate product foots up $46,295 69. 
During the week ending June 28th, 325 tons of ore were 
extracted, tho average assays of car samples showing 
$63 10 to the ton. The shaft has been completed, and 

work commenced in opening the seventh level. Opbtb, 

under moderate sales, shows a decline. The drift, on the 

29th ult., was 397 feet in length. Nothing new from 

the Imperial ; sales light. The office is removed to 419 
California street. 

Of prominent White Pine stocks dealt in by the Board 
the News of tho 26th ult. has the following : 

Aurora Consolidated — is looking remnrkably well 
throughout. The south shaft is 55 feet deep, and in a 
large body of high-grade ore. At a depth of 30 feet a 
breast is being pushed south in good ore. This is below 
the north breast from the same shaft, which has pene- 
trated 20 feet. The drift northerly from the Iceberg 
shaft still progresses, and is now in 90 feet. The ship- 
ments of ore continue at about 20 tons daily, but the 250- 
ton pile of ore on the dump still increases in size. The 
drift from the Iceberg to Last Chance Bhaft has been en- 
larged, and as soon as milling facilities can be had equal 
to the yield of the mine, cross-cutting will be commenced 
from this drift to the southeast, and the ore taken to 
both shafts for hoisting, 

Hidden Treasure (Original) has sent to mill about 
118 tons of ore during the week, or about 17 tons per day, 
and is taking out 60 tons per day of good milling ore. 
The tunnel is in 98 feet ; 150 feet (or 52 feet more) will 
strike the ledge at a depth of 200 feet from the surface 
near the south end of the claim. The west wall has been 
reached by the cut, and the entire ledge is being breasted 
to the southeast. Work is being prosecuted along the 
ledge from one end of the claim to the other, and an ore 
breast has been commenced 150 feet north of the south 
line, to which point it will be pushed. 

Noonday — has a drift south 200 feet, with a cross-cut 
100 feet in, running 40 feet east and 15 feet west. Twenty 
feet in the main drift a winze has been sunk 62 feet, from 
the bottom of which a drift has been run 20 feet through 
quartz. The north shaft is down 30, with a south drift 
of 18 feet. About 36 tons of good ore on the dump. 

VmGiNiA. — The main shaft is down 30 feet, and 8 more 
will connect it with the tunnel. The bottom of the 
shaft is in very rich ore. All the work about the mine 
is progressing favorably. Ten tons of ore were sent to 
the Centenary mill on Thursday lust, and more is being 
assorted. On Saturday lust an assessment of $1 25 per 
share was levied on the capital stock, which will become 
delinquent July 20th. 



Weekly Shareholders' Directory, for 
Meetings, Assessments and 
Dividends. 

[Compiled for every Issue, from advertisements In the 

Mimm: akd SciKKTinc Pttitsa and other San 

Francisco Journals.] 

Comprising the Names of Companies, District or Connty 
of Location: Amount and date of Assessment; Date ot 
Meeting; Day of Delln-iuent Sale; and Amount and Time 
of Payment of Dividends. 

ASSESSMENTS. 
KAMI, LOCATION, AHOCNT, AND DAY SAY 

DATK OF tSflKSSMKNT. nEMNQDKirr. OFSALK 

Alpha Cons. Storey co., Nev.. June 5, S5 Julv 10— Jul v 31 

Blue Rose, While Pine, Mav 31, 5c July'lO-August 1 

Rulllon, «iorev co., Nev. May 2i, $10.. Payable immedTaiclv 

Brodt, While Pino. June 23, 25c ...July 29-Sept, 4 

Central. Storey co , Nov.. Juno 23. $2.59 Julv 34— Aug 1 4 

Ctvinlrt. Mexico, Jun« t9 ( $1.25 July 24— Aug. 12 

Cons ChlorHe Flni, W. P.. May 28. SI Julv 7-Jnly 20 

Cherokee Flat, Butte co.. June 2«. $5 Aug. 3— Aug. 18 

Cuba Conn., White Pine. June 24. 6c July 24-Aug. in 

Onyuira Chief, White Plr.e, June 21. luc July m-Ancr. 10 

Dauey, Lyon 00,, Nev., Mm- 20, $1 50. July 1— July 19 

Daniel Webster. White Plu<\ Juno 30. l6c..,Iulv 30— Auy. IS* 

Etna, White Pine, May 12, 10c... June 17— July7 

Kdllh, WMt.- Pine. M>iy 12, 10c June 17-July 7 

Evening Star, White Pine, Juno 25, IOc....July 31— Aug. 21* 

finUl Hill Q . Storey CO., .June », $1 Aug 2-Au r 23 

Hidden Treasure. White Pine. June 29. 50e. A tic. 4— A lie, 25 

Hope Oravel, Nevada co . May 17, $1 June 21— July 12 

IXL, Alpine co, Mav 10. * I 00 June 26— July 14* 

.in 1 1. 1, Storey co., Nev. May 27, 5(1 June 29-July 17 

Knntuck, Storey co , Nev., Juno 14, Sltl July 15— Aug. 3 

Lexington, White Pino. May 18. 15c June 23- Julv 12 

Mazeppa, White Pine. June 3", 10c Aug. 5-Sept. II 

Morning Star, Alpine Co.. May 11 June 21— July 12 

Miixwdl. Ainnriorco , MayI5. $1 lunc I6-Julv 15 

Mammoth. *hlie Pine, May 20.25c June 26— July 16 

Magenta, While Pine. June 23, 10c July 29-Sept .4 

Mahogany. White Pine, June 17, 10c July 23— Aug. 13 

Metropolitan, white Pine, Mav :>G, $1.50 Julv 1— July 16 

Noonday, White Pine. June 14, 3uc July 19— Aug. 9 

North Star, Nevada co., June 4. $20 July 9 — July :*0 

North Star. White Pine. May 12, 7Hc June 18— July 17 

North Bloomfleld, Nev. co, Mav 18. $1 50.,.. June I9-JuTv5 

Overman, Storey co., Nov., MnylS, $20 lime 18- Julv 3 

Onhlr.Storey co , Nov., May 18. $3 June 21— July 6 

'•loehe. While Pine. April 6, 15c June 30-.luly30 

Poc-itlllo, While fine, May 17. $1 Juu«24-July 15 

Baihhun, White Pine, June 22. $1 July 27— Auir. 14 

San Jacinto. Tin. May 27. 50c June 28— July 13 

Silver Moon, White Pine. May 31. 5c July 10— August 1 

silver Wave, While Pine, June 7, 20c July 8— Julv 28* 

Silver Vault. White Pine. July l.ffc Aug. 7— Aug. 28 

Virginia. White Pine. June 17, $1.25 Inly 26-Aue. 11 

Whhe Pine Water. June 23, $50 July 28 -Aug. 16 

Willi mantle, White Pine, May 20, 20c July 19-Aug. 10* 

MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 



Justice and Independent 8 9 

Kentuck 165 170 

Lady Bryan 65 CO 

American 11% 12 

Ooddei tal 24 *a 

Ophlr 20 20% 

Overman 102 104 

Segregated Belcher 0% 10 

savage 88% 89 

Sierra Nevnda 48 60 

Union — _ 

United States , _ _ 

Yellow Jacket [7% 67% 

MISCELLANEOUS MININQ STOCKS. 

Amador 'California) 280 290 

Aurora, White Pirn-. — 20 

Eureka, <<'iilttomla) — 225 

i;nldin Chariot (Idaho) 40 42 

Silver Cord (Idaho) _ _ 

rtolden Rtile.Calitornio 10 _ 

Mohawk (California — _ 

Pucotlllo, White Pine....: 10 



$763,166 55 



Book accounts $3,005 56 

Office fixtures 1 ,174 56 

Cash on hand May 31, 1869. 7,680 IS 



$775,026 83 
From the Alta mine 42,958 tons of ore were reduced, 
aggregating $576,371 or an average of $13 37 per ton ; 
and from the Holmes mine 2,214 tons, amounting to 
$25,775, equal to $11 64 per ton. The cost of reducing 
12,333 tons of ore at the Gold Hill mill amounted to 



Coals to Newcastle. — The Santa Bar- 
bara Post says that not leas than three mill- 
ion feet of lumber have been imported 
into Santa Barbara county within the two 
years past; and this while immense forests 
of the finest timber in the State may be 
found in the Santa Ynes Mountains, which 
run through the central portion of the 
county, within eighteen miles of the town 
of Santa Barbara, where the lumber is 
landed for theinorthern coast. "Where are 
our saw-mill men? The Post says there is 
a fine opening for somebody in that line. 



Albemarle, Whl'e Pine Annual Meeting July 5 

Chollar-Pntnsl, Storey co„ Nev Annual Meeting July 12 

Cheater, White Pine Annual Mooting July 30 

Kewanee Annual Meeting July 10" 

Miner's Dream. White Pine Annual Meeting July 6 

Overman, Storey co., Nov An mal Meeting Julv 8 

Pocohrntas Aniuuil Meeting July 6 

San Fernando Tunnel. White Pine. Annual Reeling Aug. 2* 

Savage, Storey Co., Nev Annual Meeting July 15 

Sedgely. White Pino Annual Meeting Aug. 2* 

S'erra Nevada, Stornv co., Nev Annual Meeting July 6 

While Cloud, White Pine Annual Meeting Aug. 2* 

LAST DIVIDEND. 
Alpha Cons , Storey co., Nev .dlv. $2.... Pay. June 19, 18R8 

Amador Co., div. $10 per share Payable May 5, ISP9 

Bacon, Storey co. , Nev.,div Payable June 19, 1863 

ChollarPotoai, dlv., S15 * Payable June 3, 1869 

Concv, preferred Stock, dlv. 1% percent May 10,1859 

Crown Point, dividend, $7.50 Payable Sept. 12 1868 

Empire M. A M.. Nev., dividend $6. ...Payable May 15, 1867 

Eureka, dlv. $7.50 Payable June in. 1869 

Gould & Curry, div. $7.50 Payable May 16, 1867 

Gold HIHQ M A M-dividcnd. $7 60... -Payable July 13, 1868 

Golden Chariot, Idaho, div. $3 Payable Juno 15, 18t>9 

Golden Rule. Tuolumne co, div. 60cft sh.. Pay. June 26. 1869 

Hale & Norcross, dlv. $6 May 10, 1869 

Imperial, storev co., Nev., div Payable June 20, 1868 

Industry. While Pine, div„$l Payable July 1,1869 

Keystone, Sierra co , dlv., $32 Payable May 6, 1869 

Kentuck, dlv., $20 per share Payable Jan. 10,1869 

North Star, dividend, $5 Payable Aug. 15, 1868 

Occidental, div. $2 Payable March 2, 1869 

Pacific Unassessable, div Payable June 18, 1868 

Sand Spring salt, dividend $1 Payable Jan. 5,1869 

Santiago, Silver City, dividend, 52 50... Pay able Dec 19, 1868 
Savage, Virginia. Nev. dividend, $4. ..Payable May 11,1869 
Sand Springs Salt. Virginia. div.,$l . .. .Payable May 5, 1869 
Sierra Nev., Storey co.. Nev.. div. $2. SO... Pay. June 10, 1S69 
Virginia &G.H Water Co.. Dividend, payable April 16, 1869 
Yellow Jacket, div., $5 Payable March 15, 1869 

Those marked with an asterisk (*) are advertised intnlB 
journal. ^^^^^^^^^^ 

Latest Stock Prices Bid and Asked. 

S. r. STOCK .AND EXCHANGE BOARD 

Fridat Evening, July 2, 186f>. 

•*T* MISCELLANEOUS STOCKS. Bid. Asked. 

United States bonds, 6 20s, 1855, '67, '68 £ — — 

United States Bonds, 6 20s, 1864 — — 

United States Bonds. 5-2us, 1862 86 87% 

Legal Tender Notes 74% 74% 

California State Bonds, 7s, 1857 95 — 

San Francisco Bonds, 10a, 1851 par A int. 

San Francit-co City Bonds, 6s. 1855 — — 

San Francisco City and County Bunds, 6s, 1858. 55 87% 

San Francisco School Bonds, 10s, 1861) 100 — 

San France co School Kmxis, IDs, 1861 par & inL 

San Francisco City and Co. Sch'l B'ds, 7s, 1866. 88 90 

San Francisco Citv and Co. Bonds, 7s, 1862 88 90 

San Francisco City and Co. Bonds, 7s, 1864 88 90. 

San Francisco Citv and Co. Bonds, 7b. 1865 88 90 

San Francisco City and Co. Jurtg. Bds. 7s, 1863. 83 90 

San Francisco Cityand Co. Judg. Bds, 7s, 1864. 88 90 

Sacramento City Bonds 35 4tf 

Sacramento County Bonds, 6s 



San FranciEco Market Kates. 

VTholeiiule Prior*. 

Fkidat, July 2, 1869. 

Flour, Extra, flbbl $* 75 i$$5 50 

Do. Superfine 4 25 ® 4 60 

CortiMcal,^ lUOfcs 2 00 @ 2 25 

Wheat, "t* mo Bis l 40 @ 1 65 

Outs, ^ 100 lbs. 1 60 @ 1 75 

Barley, "$ 100 Iba 1 00 @ 1 15 

Beans, %i lOli lbs 6 00 @ 6 00 

Potatoes, s* lul) tha 60 @ 1 15 

liny. 3* ton 10 00 ®I7 00 

Live Oak Wood, $ cord 9 00 ®10 00 

Beef, extra, dresr.cd. ^ Ot 7 ® 9 

Sheep, on toot 2 50 O 3 00 

Hogs, on foot, 'H ih 6 @ 7 

Hogs, dressed, # lb 9 Q 10 

GROCERIES, ETC. 

Sugar, crushed, ^1 lb 14% ® 15 

Do. China lu ® 11 

Coffee. Costa Rica, t* lb 19 @ 20 

Do. Rio — @ 19 

Tea, Japan, ^ lb 75 @ 90 

Do. Green 60 @ 1 25 

Hawaiian Rice, fllb...,. 9% ® 10 

China Rice, ^ lb &£? @ 6% 

Coal Oil, j* gallon 45 @ 47% 

Candles, % lb 16 @ 18 

Ranch Butter. V lt> i 35 ® 38 

Isthmus Butter, %4 lb 32% @ — 

Cheese. California, r 1 . 0) 16 ® 17 

Eggs, $ dozen 35 ® 42% 

Lard,& lb.... 15 ® 17 

Main and Bacon, >' tb 14 ® 16 

Shoulders, $) tt> 7 ® 6 

Aetall Prices. 

Butter, California, fresh, $i lb 46 @ 60 

do. pickled, ■$ lb 30 @ — 

do. Oregon. $lb 20 @ 2* 

do. New York, "H lb 35 ® 40 

Cheese, jH lb W @ 25 

Honey, w lb 25 ® 80 

Eggs, <s dozen 60 ® 55 

Lard,$Uh 18 @ 20 

Hams and Bacon, ^ lb 2.) ® 25 

Cranberries, ^i gallon 1 uo @ 1 16 

Potatoes, 5?S lb 1% @ 2 

Potatoes, Sweet, ^ lb — ® — 

Tomatoes. 39 lb 5 @ 10 

Onions, %tb 5 @ 8 

Apples, No. 1, %4 lb 4 @ 6 

Pears, Table, fi lb fi @ 7 

Plums, dried. W lb 10 ® 12 

Peaches, dried, *tf* Bb 10 @ 18 

Oraugcs, r j.\ dozen 60 @ 60 

Lemons, $ dozen — ® 1 00 

Chickens, apiece 76 ® 1 00 

Turkeys,$lb 30 ® 35 

Soap, Pale and CO 7 ® 12 

Soap, Castile, p 1 Tb 18 ® 20 



75 
65 



80 



72>J 



Stocklon City Bonds 

Yuba County Bonds, 8s 85 

Santa Clara County Bonds. 7 s 76 

Butte County Bonds, 10s, I860 75 

San Mateo County Bunds, 7s 75 

California Steam Navigation Co — 

Spring Valley Water Co 64%. 

State Telegraph Co 25 

GAS COMPANIES. 

San Francisco GasCo 792£ 

Sacramento Gas Co 62 

RAILROADS. 

Sacramento Valley Railroad — 

San Francisco and San Jose Railroad — 

Omnibus Railroad — 

Central Railroad 50 

North Beach and Mission Railroad — 10 

Front Street, Mission and Ocean Railroad 11 \i 

BANKING INSTITUTIONS. 

PaciflcBank 97% 100 

The Bank of California 150 160 

INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

People's Insurance Company 90 95 

Flremana' Fund InsuranccCu 94 9.) 

Pacific Insurance Co 1 10 116 

Merchants' Mutual Marine Insurance Co 600 520 

California Insurance Co — 1SU0 

Onion Insurance Co 95 100 

Home Mutual Insurance Co 19% 20 

Occidental Insurance Co 85 91 

MINING STOCKS— WASHOE DISTRICT. 

Alpha 24 25% 

Baltimore American — — 

Belcher 22 25!$ 

Bullion, G. H 20 21 

Crown Point °Z 52 »£ 

Cole(Va.) - 9 

Confidence 43 60 

Consolidated Virginia — 10 

Chollar-Potosl SW 320 

Dancy 3% * 

Exchequer '1 1* 

Empire Mill and Mining Co 50 ,0 

Gould* Curry US 117 

Gold Hill Quartz 42% 70 

Hale & Norcross l«8 14' 1 

Imperial 70 74 

Julia s\i 6 



San Francisco Metal Market, 

PRICES FOR INVOICES. 

Jobbing price* rule from ten to fifteen per cent, higher than tha 
following quotations. 

Friday, July 2, 1869. 
Iron.— Duty: Pig, $9perton; Railroad, 60c %nuOB>6; Bar, 
l@l"^c tH lb; Sheet, polished, 3c ^ lb: common, \)4@\%^ 
r-' lb; Plate, l%c ^ lb; Pipe, l%c $t lb; Galvanized, 2%c 
% lb. 

Scotch and English Pig Iron i$;ton $42 60 ®$ 

White Pig ^ ton 36 00 @ 

Refined Bar, bad assortment f> tb — 03 @ 

Refined Bar, good assortment, ¥, lb — 04 ® — — 

Boiler, No. 1 to 4 — 04JJ® 

Plate, No. 5 to 9 ® — 0j% 

Sheet, No. 10 to 13 — 04%@ — 6 

Sheet, No. 14 to 20 —05 ® — C% 

Sheet, No. 24 to 27 —OS ®— 6% 

Copper.— Durv: Sheathing, 3%c $ lb; Plgand Bar,2%c ®TS 

Sheathing, fe lb — — ® — 26 

Sheathing, Yellow —20 ® — 21 

Sheathing, Old Yellow — 10 @ — 11 

Composition Nails — 21 ® — 22 

Composition Bolts — 21 @ — 22 

Tin Plates.— Duty: 25 3* cent, ad valorem. 

Plates, Charcoal, IX, ft box 12 00 ® 

Plates. I C Charcoal ® 11 00 

Roofing Plates. 10 00 ® 10 60 

BancaTln. Slabs, ft lh @ — 35 

Ptkkl.— English Cast Steel, ft lb @ — 16 

Quicksilver.— ffl lb — 65 ® — 60 

LEAD.-Pig.ftlb - 7%@— 8 

Sheet — 10 @ — — 

Pipe — II ® 

Bar — 9 ®— 9 

Zinc— Sheets, ft lb • — 10%®— 11 

Borax.— Callfornla.ft lb —35 @ —38% 



Latee fkom the Avitok. — Before going 
to press, we learn of another trial of this 
new aerial vessel at the "Avitor Works/' 
on the San Jose* Railroad. Report says 
that it rose proudly into the air, " sailed 
around" the rural burg with fine effect, and 
then settled down again like a new fledg- 
ling, still ambitious for further assays. 
This was only a working model, 28 feet 
long, 8 feet average diameter, cubic con- 
tents 1,360 feet and weight 82 pounds; gas 
78 pounds. Man has so nearly mastered 
this problem of aerial navigation that there 
prevails a very general faith in the final 
success of some machine of the kind. Fur- 
ther particulars will be obtained, if possi- 
ble, of the next voyage. 



Caxifobnia Salmon at the East. — An 
extensive fish dealer at Sacramento has re- 
ceived an order from St. Louis for regular 
supplies of California salmon, to be sent 
by the Pacific Railroad. He immediately 
shipped a lot done up in ice. This is a 
new and unexpected development growing 
out of the completion of the overland rail- 
road, and may possibly lead to important 
results. The Pacific Coast can supply the 
world with salmon. 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 3, 1869. 



Mining Summary. 

The following information is gleaned mostly from 
journals published in the interior, in close proximity 
to the mines mentioned. 



California. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

Merrimac. — Miner, June 19th: This 
claim is likely soon to be started. Eastern 
owners have written to have a thorough 
investigation, with a report as to prospects. 

Morning Stab. — Work is now on drift 
number 8 in the lower level. 

Pennsylvania. — Of the product from 
the ton of ore recently taken to Washoe we 
can yet learn nothing. 

Owners Coming. — We hear of several 
large owners of mining interests in this 
county residing East who are coming here 
soon to see for themselves how the land 
lies. This is the only proper way. 

Items. — The two long tunnels at Bullion 
are going ahead . . . .The amalgamating room 
of the M. C. mill is going up with alacrity. 
. . . .Another change has taken place in the 
Globe tunnel, and the rock works better. 
. . . .The Placerville corporation has mani- 
fested a sign of life in writing here to know 
the amount of taxes due on its mine. 

Coming Back. — Chronicle, June 19th: N. 
Graff, formerly Supt. of the Tarshish mine, 
but at present Supt. of a silver mine at 
San Marcial, Sonora, Mexico, is coming 
back, and will probably take charge again 
of the Tarshish. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

"Union Shaft. — Chronicle, June 26th: 
The baling from the old Union shaft con- 
tinues without abatement — even of the 
water. There are some eight feet still in 
the mine. Champion, Peters & Ahnert, 
the proprietors, will prove successful, or 
" go through " in the undertaking. 

Palomo.— Letter to same from San An- 
dreas: The new hoisting works and batter- 
ies are perfection. They have a new style 
of shaking table invented by Mr. Brief, 
the foreman, who, I believe, has applied 
for a patent. It is on rollers, instead of 
beiog suspended from frame-work; and is 
moved by a crank, without any side motion. 
I am informed that the quartz mining in- 
terests at Angels Camp are prosperous, the 
mills all being in active operation and do- 
ing well. At the Big Mill mine they have 
struckitrich — rock that will pay over §1,000 
per ton — that is, they have 15 inches in 
width that will pay that amount, while the 
balance pays from $10 to $20. 

LOS ANCELES COUNTY. 

Soledad. — Star, June 19th: Messrs. J. 
A. Hayward & Co., bankers, received this 
week 50 ozs. gold from the Eureka Mining 
Co., Soledad, being the result of a nine 
days' run. The water is becoming very 
low, and operations will have to proceed 
hereafter slowly. 
MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

The Gazette of the 25th says that rock 
from the Mariposa Co's vein in that town, 
is being prospected at the Benton mills by 
the dry plan. If that plan seems best 
suited for the rock, the Mariposa mill will 
be reconstructed. 
NEVADA COUNTY. 

North Bloomfteld. — Transcript, 23d: 
The Gravel Mining Co. have shut down in 
their claims, and are working with all en- 
ergy to complete their ditch from Little to 
Big Canon Creek. The line of the ditch is 
over rough ground and will require a large 
amount of fluming and blasting. 

Snow Point. — Same of 25th: The pros- 
pect at this old camp is first-rate. The 
Water Co. has a mine regarded as one of 
the best on that ridge. The company has 
been stripping all summer and running 
from 600 to 800 in. of water. McCarrow & 
Co. are drifting in the old Golconda claims, 
and at their last clean up took out some 
gold which very much resembles that on 
the opposite ridge, at Minnesota, in Sierra 
County. These claims were abandoned for 
many years, until this season. Cowger & 
Co. are runniug a drifting tunnel, and have 
excellent indications. Price and his men 
are still at work, as they have been for 
many years. 

Moore's Flat. — The Eagle _Co. have 
commenced sluicing through "their new 
tunnel, aod are running for the rich chan- 
nel worked by Hickey several years ago. 

The Illinois Co's claims and Hickey's 

have been worked steadily and are paying 
well. . . .The old St. Lawrence is owned and 
worked by Chinamen Atwater & Knot- 
well have got their pipe down and ready 
to run water to their claims. 

Woolsey's Flat.— We learn that the 
town never looked as prosperous as at 
present. The XIX Co., owned by Marks 
& Co., are doing splendidly, and give em- 
ployment to a good many men. Last week 



they cleaned up $11,000, and the prospect 
is that their next will be larger. 

Shultz & Stober are working with energy, 
and it is paying them well. 

Beed & Mills are working the Blue Bank 
claims. They have been drifting for years, 
and everybody knows they are doing well. 

Belief Hell- — Same of 26th: For sev- 
eral years companies prospecting for the 
gravel channel, now have fair promise of 
Buccess. The North Star ground is worked 
by the Eureka Lake Co., and they are do- 
ing well. The Wakashore Co. employs 12 
men, now drifting, and the claim has been 
for some time averaging $12 per day to the 
man. This company has struck the chan- 
nel, and is in 200 ft. further than any other. 
The Eagle claims have 100 ft. fall, and are 
within 60 or 80 ft. of the pay channel. They 
will commence washing this fall and run 
their tunnel up to the bank. Beasoner & 
Bro. are obtaining favorable results. When 
the Eagle Co. strike the dirt, other claims 
will be started, and there is every prospect 
that Belief Hill will become a lively camp. 

The Manzanita Claims. — Same of 29th: 
Marselus & Maltman have started a new 
tunnel, and are sinking a shaft on a line 
with the tunnel, in order to get a new face 
in the bank for washing. The tunnel is to 
be run on a 5-inch grade. It will be 1,300 
or 1,400 ft. long, and will enable the com- 
pany to work 38 ft. deeper than at present. 

Jones' Bar. — oonsiderable mining is be- 
ing done in the vicinity of Jones' Bar this 
season. Several companies are preparing 
for washing, and will commence as soon as 
the river gets low enough. 

Mining Affairs. — Grass Valley Union, 
25th: There was a rumor a few days since 
that the Miners' Union has backed down 
from its position of hostility to the giant 
powder, and would now go entirely against 
Chinese labor in the mines. The rumor 
was false and the strikers remain firm as 
ever against the giant. As to Chinese labor, 
no one has proposed to introduce that into 
the mines, and hence there is no truth in 
the 'reputed new position of the miners. 
The Superintendents of the idle mines, 
Empire and North Star, are in San Fran- 
cisco, and we understand they are determin- 
ing upon some method of going to work at 
an early day. It is probable that in the 
first part of next week, we shall know what 
is to be done with the mines. At the Eu- 
reka and the Idaho, matters move on in the 
old quiet way, and both mines will surely 
pay their regular dividends at the first of 
next month. 

Empire Mine — Yesterday morning the 
Empire Mining Co's mill started up to 
crush the rock which had been heretofore 
taken out. There are between 200 and 300 
tons of rock in front of the batteries. Soon 
after the whistle sounded a number of men, 
willing to work any way the proprietor 
wanted them to do, applied for employ- 
ment, and Capt. Lee concluded to try once 
more to fill the mine. Yesterday afternoon, 
at 4 o'clock, about 30 men had been em- 
ployed, and there was every prospect that 
the full number wanted could be obtained 
by to-day. If, however, the Empire can 
not be filled with men willing to work as 
the company want work done, the mine 
will be closed down indefinitely. 

Victory Mine — Grass Valley National, 
25th: This mine, on Massachusetts Hill, 
has been worked during the summer, for 
eight years, the water having occasioned 
intermissions. A shaft has been sunk to 
the depth of 20 ft, and a drift run 300 ft. 
on the ledge. The mine has been thor- 
oughly prospected aod they have a well- 
defined ledge. Considerable rock has been 
taken out, which has averaged $14 to the 
ton. A whim has been erected for hoisting, 
and it is the intention of the owners to put 
up steam machinery soon. The mine is 
owned and worked by James McCann and 
others. 

PLACER COUNTY. 

Damascus. — Correspondence of Stars 
and Stripes, 24th: " Last week the Mount- 
ain Gate Co. got through with their tunnel 
and raised their shaft to gravel. This is the 
most extensive tunnel in Placer County, be- 
ing over 3,000 feet in length, and has token 
much money and many years' labor. It 
taps a claim of great extent. 

Robert Lewis has got a splendid pros- 
pect in the Mill claim, and it is likely to 
prove one of the best in Placer County. 
Charley Cook has made a clean up and har- 
vested a splendid lot of gold. Billy Cam- 
eron is doing pretty well in the Big Gun 
claim, and times are quite lively." 

TRINITY COUNTY. 

New Btver. — Journal, 26th: The Portu- 
guese Co. have begun cleaning up, and 
have taken out already about $4,000, with 
considerable washing up to do yet. John 
Keach cleaned up with good pay. . There 
are 30 miles of New river offering first-rate 



inducements to miners who would prospect 
and work as they do in other localities. 

Lewiston. — We understand that two or 
three companies intend going into the river. 
There is every reason to believe that the 
Trinity will be lower this summer than 
ever. 

Minersvtlle. — P. Van Matre brought 
$858 of fine-looking gold dust to Weaver- 
ville, recently picked up on Little Mule 
creek, during three weeks' piping. The 
gold is coarse, one piece weighing four 
ounces. It was from the Wheedon claim. 

Lower Trinity.- — McCallum & Clifford 
have first-rate prospects on French creek, a 
stream emptying into Trinity river at the 
head of Taylor's Flat. Gratifying results 
have been obtained by other partiesin Saw- 
mill creek. 

Junction City. — A correspondent writes: 
Most of the miners are cleaning up, and 
money is beginning to be plenty. As none 
of the claims have finished yet, I cannot 
give you the amount of the gold yield. 
Joseph McGillivray is now in San Fran- 
cisco, purchasing iron-pipe to place across 
Trinity river to carry water from his Canon 
creek ditch to claims on the flat and bar 
opposite. The flat on this sids of Canon 
creek is said to prospect big, and, could 
water be had, would pay immensely. Mac 
says if any number of miners will put up 
$1,200, subject to his order when the work 
is completed ! that he will bring water on 
the ground for them, and give them their 
money's worth in water. 
YUBA COUNTY. 

A Rich Mine. — Appeal, 24th: A gentle- 
man from the upper country, in Campton- 
ville last week, saw the proceeds of the Eu- 
reka mill for ten days' run with five stamps, 
crushing only day times, 600 ounces of 
gold, valued at $10,000. He was informed 
that their clean up was $6,000 fiom five 
days' washing. While at work they took 
out one specimen valued at over $1,500. 
The owners are citizens of Caniptonville. 

Arizona. 

Bich Discovery. — Visalia Delta, June 
23d: Messrs. Moss, McGuire and Belcher 
returned last week, from a two month's 
cruise between White Pine and the Colo- 
rado. They have made some of the richest 
discoveries made on the coast — their ore 
running from one hundred up into the 
thousands — and ledges from three to thirty 
feet in width, with an abundance of wood, 
water and grass; within a very few miles 
are immense forests of yellow pine. They 
will start out again in a day or two with full 
equipments and supplies. 

Northern Arizona. — It is' reported that 
Gov. Sanford and Capt. Maxwell, have or- 
ganized a party and equipped, for the pur- 
pose of exploring the Apache country in 
search of placer mines. Each man fur- 
nishes his own outfit and all share in the 
proceeds of the adventure. They expect 
to leave Fort Yuma in July. 

Colorado. 

Awanda Lode — Georgetown Miner, 
June 17th : Pearson & Fellows, after sev- 
eral months' hard labor, struck, on Tues- 
day, 20 inches of sulphurets of silver and 
galena. The shaft is now 20 feet deep, the 
crevice five feet, between solid walls. 

Items. — They have struck a 12-inch vein 
of first-class mineral in the east drift on the 

Lilly lode, on Brown Mountain A. 

Johnson is obtaining very rich ore from 
the Major Anderson lode, Griffith Mount- 
ain Work on the crushing and dressing 

works is progressing rapidly Stewart's 

reduction works were flooded by high 
water on Monday night, and he was forced 
to shut down. 

Equator. — Ninety-three tons of second- 
class Equator ore, worked by Huepeden & 
Co., yielded per ton in ounces saved 115.8. 
Per ton in coin $149. 72. 

Topeka. — Central City Herald, June 9th: 
Wylie & Hurst have commenced work on 
the Topeka lode, Bates' Hill. A shaft 75 
feet was sunk some years ago, and good ore 
reached, but not rich enough to pay at the 
price of labor then ruling. It will pay very 
well now. 

Items. — The dams on all the claims on 
South Clear Creek have been washedaway. 
Some of the miners were taking out pay 
and fought against the water for a long 
time, but they were not able to withstand 
it. The creek is very high and still rising. 
A new .lode has been found in Mount- 
ain House district, which, at a depth of 18 
feet, shows a crevice of four feet, with ore 

one foot wide John Sensenderfer has 

got his 20-stamp mill under way. It will 
be kept busy during the summer Cam- 
eron <fc Moore have found a new lode in 
Cascade district, Clear Creek County. At 
a depth of nine feet it shows a crevice of 
eight feet, with a vein of ore one foot wide. 
A select specimen assayed by Prof. Bur- 
lingame, oontained silver at the rate of 



$1,716.26 iu coin to the ton. The owners 

refused $12,000 for one-half of it Same 

of 12th: The new discovery near Dory's 
Banch is called the Ruby lode. Ore from 

it contained $1,071.20 coin per ton 

Same of 16th : Mr. Andrews, of Nevada, 
brought down to-day 105 ounces, the result 
of one week's run on ore from Phillips & 
Burns' claim on the Jones lode. The ore 
yields 30 ounces, or $630 per cord, in a 
stamp mill. 

Clear Creek. — The Washington are put- 
ting machinery into their mill. A new 
pocket has been found in the Brown mine. 
The furnaces are in full blast. The Baker 
mine is looking better than ever. A rich 
deposit of ore has been found. The mill 
will be ready in ten days. Bruckner's pat- 
ent cylinder will be put up in a short time. 
Stewart is running on Equator ore. The 
Wilson & Cass Go's mill will be the finest 
in the county. 

Gilpin County. — Population is larger 
than ever before since 1862. If it contin- 
ues to increase as during the past month, 
our monthly product of gold will reach 
$300,000. Many valuable mines, which for 
years have been deserted, will be worked. 

Items. — Central City Register, 17th: 
Three and a half cords of ore from the 
Jones lode yielded five ounces gold bull- 
ion, worth over $2,200 Tbe Black 

Hawk produced last week from 28 cords of 
ore, 170 ounces of gold bullion. The Bob- 
tail Co. produced 92 ounces Our daily 

shipment of bullion has bei'n kept up to 
the average of $10,000 thus far this month. 

An assay by Von Schulz, of ore from 

the Coaley lode, gave 22,379.94-100 ozs., 
—or $29,094.92 coin value per ton of 2,000 

pounds Van Camp has struck another 

big pocket in the Creighton lode An 

assay yesterday of ore from the Kremlin, 
Cascade district, gave a yield of 283 ozs. 
silver per ton. 

Idaho — Trail Creek. — The BennettCo. 
have got their mill nearly completed. Cha- 
vanne & Cramer are putting up an arastra 
for reducing surface rock from the Coyote. 
Judge Colvin has the walls of his fine stone 
mill nearly completed. He also has men 
at work putting the shaft in condition lor 
taking out ore. About Mill City several 
new lodes promise well. Theo. Lowe has 
struck a vein near the Ohio Gulch said to 
promise well. Jacob Snyder has his aras- 
tra running on ore from the Albro lode, 
obtaining six to eight ounces gold per cord. 
Work is about being re-commenced on the 
Lincoln tunnel, by the King Bros. 

Bullion. — Denver News, 16th: At the 
First National Bank to-day were four bars 
of gold bullion, weighing 336 ounces, and 
valued at $7,000. At the Colorado Na- 
tional were seven bars weighing 800 ozs., 
valued at $17,000. During the past three 
days the U. S. Mint has turned ont 36 bars, 
weighing 2,200 ozs., and valued at $50,000. 

Lake County. — Letter from Granite : 
Matters are looking up. Bich ore is com- 
ing out of the Yankee Blade. Free gold 
visible. The mill will be in running order 
by July. Partridge is getting fine oie. He 
and Dr. Morrison have been running their 
mill on the Hattie Jane and Solux Tyee 
lodes with grand results. 

The great excitement of the hour is the 
discovery of a gigantic lode in the vicinity 
of the Yankee Blade. It is called the 
Johnston, and takes the shine out of every 
lode in the district. At a depth of 21 feet 
the vein is four feet wide. The ore is lit- 
erally peppered with gold. 

Idaho. 

New Diggings. — Idaho City World, June 
18th: From Mr. Smith, Deputy Collector, 
we get information of new diggings 18 
miles from this city, on the main Boise 
river, above the mouth of More creek. 
Mr. Smith and his brother sunk holes 20 
feet, and obtained from 10 to 50 colors all 
the way down. Along on the river bars, 
for a long stretch, where free water can be 
had for nine months in the 3'ear, Mr. S. 
thinks the diggings will pay from $6 to $8 
per day to the hand. 

Warren's Diggings. — Mr. Bacon reports 
mining at Warren's to be prosperous in 
placer mines, with a fair supply of free 
water. In quartz mining a good deal is 
done. The Pioneer mill, put up two years 
age, is crushing custom ores, and the water 
mill is running on ores from the ledge 
owned by the mill company or from neigh- 
boring ledges. A lot of r>3 tons of ore out 
of the Bescue ledge gave a product of 
nearly $50 per ton all through, and some 
of it went above $80. 

Florence — The mines are paying better 
than for two or three years. But, through 
lack of water, mining will soon be over for 
this year. 

Moose Creek. — The mines have already 
commenced to fail. Only a few have gone 
there from Warren's, but Dearly all who 
had were back again. AU pronounced 



July 3, 1869.] 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



the diggings comparatively a humbug. 
The area of mining ground is limited, and 
the richness of the best claims have been 
overrated. A few had succeeded pretty 
■well, and the traders who got in first had 
made money- 
Silver City Tidal Ware, June 22d: Al. 
Cage writes us from Middle Fork, Owyhee, 
June Uth: '• I think that at least two large 
ledges already found will prove to be pay- 
ing ones. There is also an extensive range 
of 'wash gravel' here, apparently all ou 
the surface. 

Nevada. 

COPE DISTRICT. 

Shermantown Telegraph, June 21st: From 
Messrs. Furst and Cavanagb, just returned 
from Elko, we glean the following. The 
reported new diggings to the north of Elko 
area grand humbug, the excitement having 
been got up to assist the sale of a lot of 
plug horses. 

Inland Empire, 22d: Persons returning to 
this city from the reported rich gold fields 
north of Elko, generally report the same a 
humbug. It is said that there is one gold 
bearing ledge of undoubted merit, and 
aside from this there are no mines, of any 
character, in that whole Bection of country. 

REESE RIVER. 

Silver Bend.— Reveille, June 26th: Bel- 
mont is beginning to recover from the ef- 
fects of the White Pine fever. The town 
is alive again. The principal ore yielding 
mine of the district is the El Dorado South, 
belonging to Messrs. Leon & Co. The 
main incline is down 270 ft., and shows a 
well-defined vein in its entire course. At 
240 ft. the vein has been pierced and shows 
a thickness of nine feet of sulphuret ore. 
Assays reuching up to a thousand dollars 
can be obtained from this portion, and Mr. 
Leon is sure that it will yield §150 per ton 
at the mill. Upwards of 500 tons of ore 
are out ready for the mill. 

Besides the El Dorado South, ore is be- 
ing taken out of the Transylvania, though 
the work is restricted to a company of min- 
ers who have a contract for taking out ore 
near the surface. A number of other mines 
are being prospected, and there is some 
talk of the Combination Co. resuming op- 
erations. 

Battle Mountain. — The business of 
shipping ore to San Francisco has bien in- 
augurated, and the result satisfactory, 
though the railroad charges §14 per ton, a 
price which will be greatly reduced after 
the 1st of July, 

Mining is carried on with activity. The 
Great Central Silver and Copper Mining 
Co., have commenced on a number of claims 
and will soon ship ore. 

The Battle Mountain Copper and Silver 
Mining Co. are working the Bay View and 
Bed Bover ledges, and are sacking ore for 
San Francisco. 

The principal mines now in process of 
development are the Union, Arizona, Mount- 
ain View, and Bed Rover. A number of 
discoveries, both in silver and copper, have 
recently been made. A. Jacobs & Co. have 
discovered a mine of argentiferous galena 
which assays up in the hundreds, and the 
camp has a lively appearance. 

The Silver interest in the district looks 
promising. The Little Giant mill, of five 
stamps, has averaged $1,000 per day for the 
last six months. It crushes wet, without 
roasting, and is distant about seven miles 
from Battle Mountain Station. 

The Mettacom. — This mill has been un- 
dergoing repairs and will be started on the 
1st of July, on the ores of the Buel North 
Star mine, of the Lane and Fuller Co. The 
mine is now yielding six tons of high grade 
ore per day. 

WASHOE. 

[ In the Stock Circular, in another por- 
tion of this paper will be found late mining 
news from this district. ~[ 

Chollar-Potosl — Enterprise, 23d: This 
mine is yielding at the rate of 230 tons per 
day, averaging §48. The drift north at the 
1,100 ft. level has reached the Hale & Nor- 
cross south line. 

Looking Well. — Same of 26th: The 
Sierra Nevada mine is looking exceedingly 
well, and the mill is running to its full 
capacity. 

Being Overhauled. — Messrs. Fair & 
Mackay, who lately purchased the Trench 
mill, at Silver City, are refitting the same. 
Two new boilers are just put in place, each 
16 ft. long by 58 in. diameter. 

Still Burning. — 27th: The fire in the 
Orown Point and Kentuck mines, Gold Hill, 
is still burning. It has been so walled in 
that it cannot go beyond certain bounds, 
which is all that could be done, and it will 
probably burn in a smouldering way as 
long as there is any timber in that portion 
of the two mines which has been aband- 
oned. 



The Bullion. — The drift east, at the 
2,400-ft level, is still progressing. 

Chollae-Potosi Bullion. — We yester- 
day saw 16 bars of bullion from the Chol- 
lar-Putosi, valued at a little over $40,000. 
The yield of the mine thus far, during the 
month, has been §110,000, and by the end 
of the month will reach §160,000. 

Good Yield. — The Hale & Norcross is 
yielding over 200 tons per day. The con- 
nection with the Chollar-Potosi has been 
made, and there is now a good circulation 
of air in the lower level. 

Occidental. — The Occidental Co. are 
making good progress with their new tun- 
nel. The rock is becoming softer; water 
about the same. 

Imperial-Empire Shaft. — This shaft is 
now down 1,157 ft No ore has been found 
as yet 

Kentuck. — About 50 tons of ore per day 
is being raised from this mine. 

WHITE PINE. 

Bullion Hill. — Inland Empire, June 
22d: In Bullion No. 10 a shaft has been 
sunk 30 feet, and vein matter found for a 
width exceeding the depth of the shaft, as 
no wall-rock has been encountered on 
either side. This mine is yielding chlo- 
ride ores of high grade. The other mines 
have not been so far developed, but all 
show high grade ores. We saw ore taken 
out which contained black horn silver sim- 
ilar to that of the Cole & Johnson mine in 
Pinto District, and from which we pub- 
lished an assay of §21,373.51. We brought 
away two specimens of ore that the best 
mines on Treasure Hill need not disown. 
They are as perfect specimens of horn sil- 
ver as were ever seen. 

Items of Mining Progress. — Empire, 
20th: Pogonip and Othello center shaft ore 

yielded by assay §700 to the ton 22d: 

The Hidden Treasure (original) is yielding 
excellent ore. In the southern works the 
deposit is on the increase in quantity and 
quality. We were shown specimens which 
were almost the pure quill — horn silver. 

23d: A body of rich chloride was 

struck a few days ago in the Burns shaft 

on Chloride Flat 24th: A rich strike in 

the Ince Hall mine: near the Eberhardt, 
yesterday. A specimen nearly pure horn 
silver, and weighing from 20 to 30 pounds, 

is on exhibition Among the articles 

placed in the corner stoneat Shermantown, 
Thursday, was a specimen of ore from the 
Keystone shaft, Eberhardt mine, worth ac- 
cording to assay, §24,000 per ton. It was 
reduced to a perfect square by sawing, and 
upon either side bore the stamp of a §20- 
piece. Dr. E. X. Willard and John Turner 

donated it for the purpose mentioned 

News, 21st: Four tunnels are piercing the 

hill south of the Mazeppa mine The 

Little Bilk,' on the northwestern slope, has 
a shaft 32 feet down, and fine indications. 
.. .. Operations have been commenced on 

the Dreadnought Five men are at work 

in the Phoenix shaft, now down 100 feet, 

with flattering prospects The Paris, on 

Pocotillo Flat, has a 38-foot shaft. The ore 
increases in richness with the descent .... 
22d: Omega shaft is down 85 feet, well 
timbered 23d: The rich ore in the Ma- 
zeppa still holds out Rich chloride ore 

is coming out of the Nettie Lamar 

Charter Oak shaft down 60 feet The 

south incline of the Hidden Treasure Con- 
solidated is down 51 feet, and the ledge is 
widening. The face of the incline is a mix- 
ture of black spar and quartz, with a fair 

amount of pay ore Work on the Silver 

Wave is prosecuted day and night. The 
shaft is 40 feet deep. Ten tons of ore is 

sacked upon the dump 25th: The 

Burns mine, on Chloride Flat, yesterday, 

struck pay ore The Manhattan mine, 

on the western slope of Argyle Hill, started 
up yesterday. The two parallel shafts of 
the old Argyle, 30 feet deep (inclining on 
the foot-wall) , are being connected at the 
bottom by a drift, from which rich chloride 
ores are being taken. 

Mills and Smelting Works. — News, 
22d: Yesterday, sixteen ox teams loaded in 
Elko with the machinery for one of the best 
10-stamp mills in the country — to be taken 
to Reveille and put in running shape in 90 
days 23d: Lucas & Logan's, at Swan- 
sea, a grinder of capacity equal to ten 
stamps, is now so far advanced that it will 

be in operation within three weeks Mos- 

heimer's smelting works, in the canon near 
the County Hospital, are approaching com- 
pletion. The boilers were put in position 
yesterday, and workmen are now building 

the furnaces Elko Independent, June 

21st: The Metropolitan mill is the most 
convenient of any we have seen. The com 
pany have some 50 tons out, the crushing 
of which will be commenced on Saturday. 
. . . .Same of 25th: On Sunday and Monday 
300 tons of freight, consisting of lumber 
and machinery for Stanford's 30-stamp 
mill at Eberhardt City, left Elko Treas- 



ure mill continues to crush daily about 36 
tons of ore, and has a supply of 500 tons 
on the dump. 

Bullion.— News, 23d: Wells, Fargo & 
Co. yesterday made what we believe war 
the heaviest shipment of bullion ever made 
in one day from White Pine— fifteen bars 
to San Francisco, §16,465.61, and three 
bars to the Eastern States, worth §5,657.61, 
making a total of §22,123.22. 

From the "Mining Review " of the News 
for the week ending June 19th, we extract 
the following: " Treasure Hill now em- 
ploys 1,463 miners, who extract 435 tons of 
good milling ore daily, and supply of ore 
now lying upon the various dumps await- 
ing milling facilities amounts to 4,171 tons. 
Aocording to milling tests of fair samples 
of this ore, it yields under stamps from 
§100 to §600 per ton. We have shipped 
this week §65,078.63, and with the ore on 
dumps and at the mills, we have about 
§1,500,000 left." 

New Mexico. 

Moeeno Mines. — " S." writes the Colo- 
rado Register from Elizabethtown, June 
10th: "Maxwell's lode is the richest on 
record. For three weeks the quartz has 
yielded at the rate of §210 per ton. It has 
one shaft 80 feet deep and drifts each way 
50 feet. The crevice averages three feet 
from the surface down. Mr. M. has a 15- 
stamp mill, and for three weeks has taken 
out from §15,000 to §16,000 per week. 
Many other lodes have been discovered, 
some of which promise well. Gulch min- 
ing is prosecuted with vigor. Every com- 
pany that has water is hard at work, Moreno 
ditch is being brought to completion. 
Already the water is turned in at the head, 
and 12 miles puddled." 

Tiebba Amaeilla. — Albuquerque Re- 
view, May 29th: It is reported that gold 
has been discovered in large quantities at 
Tierra Amarilla. Several nuggets of con- 
siderable size were found, 

Utah. 

Ogden — Corinne Reporter, June 22d: A 
mining district has been organized in Og- 
den, and mining laws adopted at a meeting 
of the Saints, which conflict with the U. S. 
mining laws. A number of rich quartz 
specimens have been brought to town by 
parties who are dumb in regard to the lo- 
cality. We have no reliable information, 
but infer from the organization of a wining 
district the other day, that something is in 
the wind. The Mormons have become 
aware that prospecting parties are in the 
mountains, and many have knowledge of 
argentiferous deposits which might be 
stumbled upon by hunters, who would lo- 
cate and work them in the very face of the 
Church; hence the organization of a dis- 
trict by the ^Saints to secure the valuable 
ground, if there is any. 

Wyoming. 

South Pass Items — Sweetwater Mines, 
June 16th : Pony Steel and Dr. Bar, on the 
Dexter lode have a shaft down 12 feet, and 
the quartz is looking fine.... A contract 
has been let to sink 35 feet deeper on the 
Nellie Morgan Argenta is a ledge dis- 
covered by Snyder and Dixson on the 12th 
inst There is a crevice of 18 inches, and 
the quartz exhibits free gold in abundance. 
The ledge is on the Jim Dyer hill. 

Rock Creek. — The Savage boys have 
struck a rich streak in Rock creek 20 feet 
wide. The company are putting in a bed- 
rock flume, and will be ready for mining 
in a short time. All the claims in Rock 
creek are paying well. 

Mason <fe Co's 10-stamp mill arrived on 
the 14th inst. The machinery is the finest 
ever turned out of the Eagle Works at 
Chief go. We believe it is the intention to 
run on custom rock. 



Cabinet Collections— Prot Ward. 

Prof. Osborn, of Lafayette College, has 
an article in the American Excliange and Re- 
view, upon economio geology, from which 
we extract the following: 

" We have noticed the stirring propensity 
in publio institutions to follow out the plan 
adopted in private collections of attempt- 
ing a reputation upon some rare specimens, 
some beautiful ' 6tar piece,' some unheard 
of species or some peculiarity which it is 
more than probable that no economical 
mineralogist, geologist, or metallurgist 
would ever think of seeing, or oare to see 
again. We need collections of greater ful- 
ness as to species and varieties, greater 
uniformity and comprehensiveness, and 
collections not overgrown or guilty of 
hypertrophy in only special departments, 
but possessing the largest varieties, and 
representing in their proportions the exact 
importance of the representative minerals, 
formations, and ores as nature in the field 
and in the bed and mine presents herself. 
It is variety in extent and comprehen- 
siveness, and representation as a whole 
rather than isolated beauty, rarity of indi- 
vidual specimen, or development of special 
species or classes, which is to constitute 
the excellence and value of economic col- 
lections. The collection in Rochester made 
by Prof. Henry A Ward, of the university in 
that city, is most complete. To those who 
have extensively visited collections at home 
and abroad it will be sufficient to say that no 
collection of lithological specimens sur- 
passes this, except that at the Garden of 
Plants, Paris, gathered by Cordier and not 
completed till after an experience of seventy 
years. Indeed, in some phases we think 
the American collection preferable. None 
covers more broadly the fields of economi- 
cal science. The varieties of species, of 
forms, and conditions give the student 
room to prepare himself for the emergen- 
cies of mining and metallurgical practice 
and in this respect the study of such a col- 
lection is invaluable." 



Tinfoil Wall-Hangings. — Anew French 
invention is for painting in oil upon tin- 
foil, to be applied to walls in a somewhat 
similar manner as paper-hangings, but with 
a water-proof mixture instead of the ordi- 
nary paste. This new wall cover adapts it- 
self perfectly to all moldings and other 
irregularities. It receives gilding, and 
preserves it without oxidation. In its 
preparation, the tin-foil is spread upon 
dampened glass, and presents a perfectly 
smooth surface to the artist. By its use, 
the disagreeable smell of paint, which is 
inseparable from the ordinary method of 
decorating walls, is entirely avoided. 

Oil foe Clocks. — Fill a flint-glass bottle 
with common olive oil and immerse a bright 
clean strip of lead in it, setting the bottle 
in a window, where it will be exposed to 
the rays of the sun for several days. All 
the gummy matter will adhere to the lead, 
leaving the oil clear and thin, and not liabla 
to become thick by age. 



Lakmanjat's Single Rail for Common 
Roads. — Some time since, a party of civil 
engineers, newspaper reporters, and men 
of science, met at Raincy, near Paris, to 
witness experiments on a new system of 
railroad invented by M. Larmanjat. 

The track had been laid from Raincy to 
Montfermeil, a distance of about four miles 
along the public highway. The novel fea- 
ture of the invention consists in a single 
rail, like a long ribbon, extending along 
one side of the road. One wheel placed at 
the forward part, alone bears on this rail, 
while the two other wheels rest on the 
ground. The cars are furnished with two 
wheels, placed underneath in their long 
axis, which rest on the rail and support 
their weight, while two other wheels, des- 
tined to preserve their equilibrium, are 
placed outside. 

A few minutes after starting, and while 
the train was running at a speed of ten 
miles an hour, it reached a grade of 410 feet 
to the mile, which it asoended without any 
apparent slacking of the speed. The train 
ran to Montfermeil in twenty minutes and 
returned in seventeen. The general result 
of this trial trip was satisfactory in every 
respect, and M. Larmanjat received the 
approbation of all present. 

A French Velocipede. — M. Guillermin's 
machine has three wheels, and is partially 
covered by an india rubber horse. This 
horse contains spiral springs and wheel 
work, which may be wound up so that the 
concern will run three miles without stop- 
ping. The head of the horse contains the 
provisions, and the body the valise, of the 
rider. 



Velocipede Patents. — At a meeting of 
manufacturers, held in New York on June 
7th, it was determined to resist all claims 
under the Lallemont and Smith patents, 
and to recognize the Hanlon patents alone. 
A fund will be raised by subscription to 
meet the expenses of the expected test suit. 

Interest in New Yoek. — The Commer- 
cial Advertiser of June 16th, speaking of 
the high ruling rates of interest, says: 
"Wall street borrowers have to pay rates 
equivalent to thirty per cent, per annum 
on Government collaterals and fifty per 
cent, on stocks, while the demand from the 
country is increasing." 

A Large Rat. — Mr. Stratton, who re- 
sides near San Leandro Bridge, killed a rat 
ou his premises a few days since, which, 
the Alameda Gazette says, weighed seven 
pounds eleven ounces avoirdupois. 



8 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 3, 1869. 



Fining and Icientific Ikess. 



W. B. EWER Sesiok Editoe. 



A. T. DEWEY. W. B. EWEE, 

DEWET & CO., Publishers. 



Office, \o. 411 Clay street, below Sansome. 



Term, of Subscription : 

One copy, per annum, in advance S3 00 

One copy, six months, in advance 3 00 

8^"For sale by Carriers and Newsdealers."^ 



Our Agents. 

Oue Friends can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and science, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their 
influence and encouraging favors. "We intend to send 
none but worthy men. 

Traveling Acentw. 

Wn. H. Murray, California and Nevada. 

Dr. L. G. Yates, California. 

Isaac D. Street, Oregon. 

KeRldent Agents. 

Oakland — W. H. Hardy. 

California and Nevada — S. H. Herring. 

Sacramento — A. S. Hopkins, No. 70 J street. 

Treasure City, Nev.— J. L. Robertson. 

Sbermantown, Nev. — T. G. Anderson. 

Helena, Montana — E. W. Carpenter. 

Black Hawk, C. T. — Harper M. Orahood. 

Centbal City, C. T. — Richards & Crane. 

Georgetown, C T. — John A. Lafferty, Postmaster. 

Denver City, C. T. — Woolworth & Moffat. 

Cheyenne, D. T. — Robert Beers. 

Omaha, N. T. — Barkalow & Brothers. 

London — George Street, 30 Cornliill, E. C. 

A. C. Knox, City Soliciting and Collecting Agent. 



Seltx Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, July 3, 1869. 



Notices to Correspondents. 

Esatj, Nevada. — The economically useful 
animal naturally adapted for dwelling at 
great elevations, are the yak, the Kiang 
or wild horse (Equus lieminouj, the 
llama tribe, and possibly the Baetrian 
(two-humped camel). The yak is by far 
the most valuable in such positions, not 
only as a beast of burden, but at the 
same time as a milk and butter producer 
it is the least injuriously affected by cold 
or rarefied air; but the range of temper- 
ature at which it can flourish is only very 
limited. The real yak can scarcely exist 
during summer at an elevation lower 
than 8,000 feet above the sea level, and 
largo herds in their native wilds have 
been observed as high as 18,600 or 18,900 
feet, and on one occasion at 19,300. la 
such regions these large herbivora only 
obtain a subsistence by daily traversing 
large tracts, and consequently are good 
travelers. It may be irjferred from the 
circumstance just named that they would 
form excellent pack animals, especially 
during the winter season of the Sierras. 

Batkbow. — The purple dyes obtained from 
coal-tar are produced by the oxidation of 
analine, by bichromate of potash. It is 
a bronze-colored substance, capable of 
dissolving in alcohol, with a beautiful 
purple color. It is indifferently soluble 
in water, but more soluble in acidulated 
water. Like indigo, it is perfectly de- 
colorized by the hydrated protoxide of 
iron; the color being restored again by 
exposure to the air. It dissolves in con- 
centrated sulphuric acid, forming a green 
solution, which, upon the addition of 
■water, precipitates the color unchanged. 
Its color is somewhat intense, as one 
pound of the solid substance will dye 
200 pounds of cotton, a moderately dark 
lilac. The color is a permanent one, not 
being acted on by light, heat, acids or 
alkalies. 

I. T. S.— The extraordinary erosive power 
of flowing water is exhibited in a 
most marked manner in the Himalaya 
and Thibet, where, according to the 
brothers Schlagenweit, the erosive action 
of many of the smaller rivers of the ele- 
vated region is 1,200 to 1,500 feet, while 
the larger ones traverse eroded valleys of 
2,000 feet and upwards, a few upwards of 
3,000 feet, steepnessof descent, and great 
rain falls are the two chief causes. 

Grinder. — Chlorine gas, for the purpose of 
dissolving gold, ought not to be employed 
at very high temperatures, such as red 
or white heats, as the chloride of gold 
becomes decomposed at elevated heats. 
A temperature considerably below boil- 
ing water, accompanied by moisture, is 
practically the most efficacious. 



The Mercantile Library benefit at the 
California Theater resulted in a sum a little 
short of $5,000. Of course this is not the 
means depended upon to place the Library 
on a sound financial footing; but as an evi- 
dence of the high favor in which the Mer- 
cantile Library stands with the public, the 
demonstration was unmistakable. 



Volume XIX. 

We herewith present our readers the 
initial number of volume nineteen of the 
Mining and Scientific Press. While we 
are not oblivious to many imperfections 
and short-comings in its management, we 
feel conscious that we have ever pressed 
steadily onward in earnest efforts to furnish 
our readers with a periodical which shall 
not only prove a valuable medium for dif- 
fusing useful knowledge among the masses 
at home, but which shall also constitute a 
fair representative abroad of the wonderful 
resources of the Pacific Coast, and the 
progress which is being made for their 
development. 

No one periodical in existence furnishes 
a more comprehensive record of the prog- 
ress of Mining, the Mechanical and Useful 
Arts, Electrical and Chemical Science, and 
of science and research generally, than does 
the Mining and Scientific Press. The 
information given from week to week is in- 
dustriously selected from every possible 
source, and carefully considered and col- 
lated by a competent editorial corps. While 
we aim to be useful, we seek also to com- 
municate information in a manner which 
shall be attractive and interesting, and 
within the comprehension of all. There 
is no field of useful research which we do 
not enter and explore for the benefit of the 
public. How far we have succeeded in 
making the Press acceptable to its readers, 
we can only judge by the words and letters 
of hearty commendation by which our 
toil is almost daily encouraged. 

During the past few months, in reply to 
numerous and earnest solicitations, we 
have added a new feature, to meet the 
growing results of our agricultural read- 
ers, and special efforts will be made, in the 
future, to render this an important as well 
a3 an interesting department. 

We are aware that much study, and wide 
and correct information in the manifold 
walks of knowledge, and in the varied 
wants of such a community as this, is ab- 
solutely necessary to render a journal like 
the one here presented acceptable to the 
progressive intelligence of the age; yet it 
will continue to be our endeavor to meet 
the end desired, and to attempt to furnish 
the people of this State with a journal of 
the character indicated, and one to which 
they can point with pleasure and with 
pride as a fair representative of the grow- 
ing wants and intelligence of the Pacifio 
Coast. 



Commissioner of Mining Statistics. — 
Mr. B. W. Baymond, Commissioner of 
Mining Statistics, is now on his travels, 
collecting materials for his next annual 
report to Congress. We learn from the 
Colorado papers that he was in that region 
about the middle of June, and that he 
would soon proceed to the mines still fur- 
ther westward. 

In relation to the non-reception in this 
State of the Government edition of Mr. 
Baymond's late report, we learn from a 
Washington correspondent that the report 
was printed in February or March last; but 
that it had laid from that time until the 
first of June in the Government bindery, 
either waiting its turn or the pleasure of 
the binder, to be bound. The report is 
now ready for delivery, and may be had on 
application to some member of Congress. 
In the meantime the public has been com- 
pelled to depend for their supply upon the 
private edition issued by J. B. Ford & Co., 
of New York. Prom the correspondent 
above alluded to we also learn that there is 
a special authorization for such publica- 
tions, by law; hence, if private publishers 
bind and issue sooner than the Govern- 
ment, we suppose it is simply because the 
Government is in no haste to issue, and ac- 
commodate the people with the proceeds 
of the labor and money which has been ex- 
pended at their cost. 



Guilds and Apprentices. 

Skilled labor in this country protects it- 
self against overcrowding and competition 
of labor by the formation of guilds and 
trades unions, whose principal office is to 
keep prices at fair rates, and in some degree 
to protect labor against capital. Justice 
and good sense are on the side of organiza- 
tions of this kind when formed and ad- 
ministered on a liberal and intelligent 
basis. It happens that the chief practical 
point in the working of trade guilds is the 
prescription of regulations to new comers 
making time or apprenticeship in the same 
line of business, a criterion of employment, 
in the place of actual qualification to do 
the duty required by the employer. In 
some of the old countries of Europe the 
laws have been shaped in the interest of 
persons established in business, and have 
discriminated against beginners by ex- 
tremely onerous regulations — such as a 
seven years' employment in subordinate 
positions before, for example, brick-laying 
or shoe-making, or lock-tinkering, can be 
practiced without some authoritative inter- 
ference. But it has been fouud by Ameri- 
can travelers in Europe that the estab- 
lished practicing mechanics and tradesmen 
that have grown into existence under such 
regulations, are of the most miserable and 
unsatifactory kind; that it is impossible 
ordinarily to expect a good job of any kind 
at their hands. Within a decade of years 
these laws have been repealed in one Euro- 
pean country after another; leaving the 
trades comparatively free, as they are in 
America. 

Here there are found certain easily ac- 
quired trades that would suffer, it is sup- 
posed, by a general deterioration of work- 
manship without some arbitrary regulation 
discriminating against beginners. Such 
are printing, the iron molders, stevedores, 
and other trades. 

The penalty against capital for a disre- 
gard of the " law" is a strike. Labor 
thus protects itself not merely against capi- 
tal, but against unskilled labor, for the 
equally effective penalty against the latter 
is to pronounce the offender a "rat." With 
labor as well as with capital, might is right. 
By the principles pertaining to the law of 
force, those that go to the wall, must go 
rudely, and forbear complaint. 

Qualification, not time, should be the 
criterion, the employing person being the 
judge, — as he is responsible to himself for 
his dollars, — fur when unskillful workers 
are allowed fair privileges the skilled ones 
will receive higher pay with greater cer- 
tainty. Just so far as guilds and trades 
unions carry out these principles to the 
letter, will they be safe or of real benefit to 
their especial trade. 

It is notorious that many a beginner will 
lay bricks, or make boots, or stick type to 
more advantage in a few months than an- 
other will in from five to ten years. Me- 
chanics of the latter class, the conservative, 
stagnating and sleepy kind, undoubtedly 
need the bolstering up of unequal laws, or 
of arbitrary rules in their favor. But it is 
precisely that business which defines Aris- 
tocracy in the old world. Therefore labor 
on such a basis justifies Aristocracy, and is 
antagonistic and degrading to itself. 

The practice of limiting the number of 
apprentices — brought to our attention by 
the strike of the iron molders at the Union 
Foundry on accouut of the employment of 
an extra apprentice — is a matter in which 
the trade guilds seem to place themselves 
in opposition to public interests. Indi- 
rectly it is likewise so to their own healthy 
condition. Why should not ten thousand 
boys who may have a fancy in that way, be al- 
lowed to learn all thepractical knick-knacks 
of the iron worker's art, in this age of iron ? 
Or why should not every proud- spirited 
young woman bo allowed or even encour- 
aged to set type in this age of printing,— to 
possess the power of compelling shiftless 



printers who deem themselves too poor to 
marry them, at least to respect them for 
their virtue and frugality? 

Those who do the talking and voting in 
the trades unions must see to it that noth- 
ing be done by them to retard facilities for 
the widest acquisition of skill in the work- 
ingman's arts and trades; for therein lies 
the greatness and prosperity of our indus- 
trial community. They should be aware 
that excellent schools of the working me- 
chanical arts have been called into existence 
in many places, and are growing in use- 
fulness and popularity as they deserve to 
do. The problem of building up powerful 
bodies of superior skilled mechanics is one 
to be solved liberally and in the interest of 
mechanics themselves; it is of such great 
importance to the manufacturing and bus- 
iness interests of the country at large that 
the true principles touching the use and em- 
ployment of skilled labor are very sure to 
receive attention and to acquire full sway 
in any event, whether antagonistically to 
the trades unions or otherwise. 



Singular Effect of Electricity on Copper 
Wire. 

Prof. Partz, of Oakland, has placed upon 
ou*- table a quantity of insulated copper 
wire, which once constituted a relay in a 
telegraphic office near this city; but which 
has been rendered useless, in consequence 
of the passage through it of a current of at- 
mospheric electricity, which had been con- 
ducted into the office by the line wire. The 
relay had been brought to this city to be 
repaired; but on being removed from the 
coil for inspection, it was discovered that a 
high degree of elasticity had been im- 
parted to the relay, as is supposed, by the 
electric current. In fact the relay is al- 
most or quite as elastic as though it had 
been made of steel instead of copper wire; 
the wire has moreover been at the same 
time hardened or tempered. 

As this change must have been brought 
about by the electric current, the fact be- 
comes one of no little consequence, in view 
of the practical importance, to which it 
points of the possibility of hardening cop- 
per by electricity. The press has fre- 
quently recorded the fact of currents of 
atmospheric electricity having passed 
through, and more or less injured relays, 
in various telegraphic offices. Has any 
effect similar to this ever been noticed be- 
fore? Such change may possibly havejbeen 
produced heretofore without being noticed ; 
In the present instance, it was not observed 
by the operators in the office, and was only 
discovered by the party in this city, to 
whom it was brought for repairs. The 
electricity which has been induced renders 
the wire unsuitable for again being coiled 
for a relay. 



Treatment of Bebellious Silver Ores 
by Amalgamation without Boasting. — 
Mr. Charles H. Aaron's valuable article on 
this subject, published in the Mining and 
Scientific Press of April 17th, has at- 
tracted such attention from metallurgists 
that the author has been persuaded to en- 
large somewhat upon that question, and to 
issue the entire in pamphlet form. The 
additional matter, which has not hitherto 
appeared in the Press, comprises ; Gen- 
eral Considerations; Modification of the 
Process; Precautions to be Observed; Ob- 
stacles ; To Know if the Ore can be 
Worked in this Way, and Notes contain- 
ing Beasons for the Foregoing. Pub- 
lished by Dewey & Co., price 25 cents. 

Prof. Whitney, late of the California 
Geological Survey, together with eight 
other College Professors of note, and a 
son of Sam. Bowles, are coming to spend 
July and August in the South and Middle 
Parks, for the purpose of making a geolog- 
ical examination of the country, and enjoy 
themselves in camping out. 



Schlagenweit lectured in English on 
Friday evening. 



July 3, 1869.] 



Tlc\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



Sheffield Scientific School of Yale College. 

The oldest and most renowned of our 
special scientific schools still prospers aud 
takes the lead amongst schools of the kind, 
now becoming quite popular in this coun- 
try. It is the starting point of a great num- 
ber of our best men who are not of the 
high school order — universal scientists sup- 
posed to be perfect in everything, — but men 
who have won merited reputation in some 
particular department to which they have 
devoted themselves. 

Such influences upon national character 
as the Yale Scientific School and other 
like special institutions, in which thorough- 
ness or nothing is the rule and habit, must 
be regarded as of the highest importance 
in their peculiar way, and not any more to be 
undervalued than the military unity by 
which the world has uow learned to recog- 
nize our country quite deferentially as an 
individual nation. 

Readers of new American literature and 
critiques have noticed the change within a 
few years, by which it has ceased to be a 
necessity for an author to be endorsed in 
England before America will have any con- 
clusive opinion of his merits. It was the 
want of an enlightened public opinion that 
made us thin-skinned, sometimes, when 
we were abused by foreigners. The piti- 
ablo aud most mortifying spectacle of go- 
ing to Europe for an opinion regarding 
ourselves, is a thing of the past. In scien- 
tific matters there has been wanting, also, 
an enlightened public opinion, the effect 
of which has been curiously different — the 
existence in every locality of a considerable 
number of boldly assuming, but secretly 
littlo self-respecting persons, who are es- 
teemed above the honest men of science, 
while our noble and world-renowned scien- 
tific men are strangely undervalued, or 
almost unknown to our worthless "public 
opinion." The first geologist of our times, 
certainly amongst the greatest living lights 
in that science, esteemed iu Europe quite as 
highly as are LyelL Murchison and Nau- 
mann, is Dana, who is not merely an author- 
ity, but is the author of the best comprehen- 
sive works on Geology and Mineralogy ex- 
tant in any language, a deep philosopher of 
the problem of creation, and, as scientist and 
man, worthy of our profoundest reverence. 
America, newspaporially, has never been 
proud of Dana, nor of its other worthy men 
of the same stamp, who do not " blow;" but 
that matters little. As in literature, there 
is already formed in this country a well 
established democratic public opinion, upon 
scientific matters, that will take care of 
itself without the least necessity for fine 
verdicts or authoritative thunder from any 
quarter. Such has been the influence of 
our soecial scieotific schools. 

The officers of the Yale School for 1867 
were as follows : 

President — Rev. Theodore D. Woolsey, 
D.D., LL.D. Professors— Wm A. Nor- 
ton, M.A., Civil Engineering and Mathe- 
matics; James D. Dana, LL.D., Geology 
and Mineralogy; Benjamin Silliman, M.D., 
General Chemistry; Rev. Chester S. Ly- 
man, M.A., Industrial Mechanics and 
Physics; William D. Whitney, Ph.D., 
Modern Languages; George J. Brush, M. 
A., Mineralogy and Metallurgy; Daniel C. 
Gilman, M.A., Physical Geography; Sam'l 
W. Johnson, M.A., Analytical and Agri- 
cultural Chemistry; William H. Brewer, 
M.A., Agriculture; Alfred P. Rockwell, 
M.A., Mining ; Daniel C. Eaton, M.A., 
Botany; Othniel C. Marsh, M.A., Palaeon- 
tology; Addison E. Verrill, B.S., Zoology. 

Instructors — Mark Bailey, M.A. , Elocu- 
tion; Louis Bail, Drawing aDd Designing; 
John Avery, M.A., Physics, etc. ; James B. 
Stone, C.E., Mathematics; Beverly S. Bur- 
ton, Ph.B., Chemistry; Charles J. Sheffield, 
Assaying. 

One hundred and twenty-three students 
were in attendance in 1867. 



The Y/hile Pine Evening Telegram of 
Shermantown, and the Elko Independent are 
two new papers that come with a flourish- 
ing appearance; published respectively by 
McElwain & Allen and by E. D. Kelley <fc 
Co. 



A Noted Oratress. 

Miss Anna E. Dickinson lately arrived in 
this city, over the continental railway. She 
speaks of greatly enjoying the mountain 
scenery, and was so particularly delighted 
with the views in the Sierra as to ride from 
Truckee over the summit on the locomo- 
tive, in order to have an open view of na- 
ture's grand wonders. 

Although yet comparatively young, (in 
her twenties) Miss Dickinson is undoubt- 
edly the most noted and talented female 
speaker of the age. She is thoroughly a 
self-made woman. 

It was our fortune to make herocqnaint- 
ance at her mother's residence iu Philadel- 
phia, in 1861, at the time of her maiden 
appearance before a Philadelphia audience. 
She had spoken a number of times pre- 
viously in the country, and up to that date 
had been strenuously opposed by her wid- 
owed mother and other members of the 
household. But spirited, determined, and 
successful, her family no longer deemed it 
prudent to oppose her decided inclination 
to public speaking. Her labors for the ele- 
vation of oppressed humanity in the inter- 
vening years, have made her better known 
to our readers than any newspaper article 
which we can indite. 

As to the true merits of Miss Dickinson's 
reputation for lecturing, our community 
will soon have an opportunity of personally 
judging, she having decided, (after receiv- 
ing urgent propositions from various quar- 
ters), to speak«at least a few times in San 
Francisco and some of the larger places in 
the State. 

Miss Dickinson is the youngest of the 
family. Her mother, an aged, orthodox 
Quaker, "still lingers in the lengthened 
shadows of life," and is one of the frankest, 
kindest mortals we ever met. Grateful and 
patient in the infirmities of age, she seems 
fittingly the waiting guardian of a natu- 
rally kind and amiable family. 

The Coming Pairs. 

The State Agricultural Fair is to com- 
mence at Sacramento September 6th, and 
continue for six days. Twenty thousand 
dollars in coin will be distributed in pre- 
miums. The Fair of the Mechanics' Insti- 
tute will not open until September 14th, 
two days after the State Fair closes. Thus 
there will be no clashing. The mechanics 
and manufacturers of San Francisco can 
contribute to both exhibitions without det- 
riment to local or special interests, while 
those of the interior can arrange for send- 
ing their articles hither in turn. The 
several new railroads completed and in 
progress toward the two great commercial 
centers — Sacramento and San Francisco — 
will offer increased facilities over former 
years for the transportation of articles for 
exhibition, and greatly facilitate personal 
locomotion to and from the places of exhi- 
bition. This circumstance, coupled with 
the fact that extraordinary exertions are 
being put forth to render these exhibitions 
more comprehensive and entertaining than 
they have ever before been, will no doubt 
largely increase the number of visitors 
to both the State Fair and the exhibition of 
the Mechanics' Institute. 

The San Joaquin Stock and Implement 
Association also announces that it will give 
an exhibition this fall, at which liberal pre- 
miums will be offered. The premium list 
and time for the exhibition will be given 

to the public in a few days. 

♦■-*— ^^-.«- ■ 

The Congressional Committee of Ways 
and Means, accompanied by their steno- 
graphic Secretary, Mr. Smith, of the House 
official reporters' corps, have been en- 
gaged not merely in pleasure excursions, 
but inhearing testimony, and making visits 
of inquiry connected with a variety of mat- 
ters of importance to the revenue and inte- 
rior departments. Oregon and Alaska will 
receive their attention. They depart in a 
few days for a voyage on the Columbia. 



The Expedition of the "Summer 
Cloud," 

In search of a Lost Gold Ledge in Alaska, 
which sailed Thursday, June 17tb, takes 
with it our imagination, and a lively inter- 
est in the haps and mishaps that may befall 
the " bold adventurers "—seven men, all 
told, including crew and company, viz., 
Thomas Haggott, Captain; Jonas W. Bow- 
man, George Tew, Christopher Ford, Hugh 
Gallagher, John Hannah, and Joaquin 
Torres. 

Their "ship," an unornamented schooner, 
might easily be mistaken, if not the crew 
as well, for one of those old Spanish vis- 
ions of exploration belonging to another 
age, when Spanish blood was free; and the 
party might be imagined to be led, per- 
haps, by another Velasquez or Cortez,— 
should we take our glance of the idle craft 
as it make3 long, and slow-advancing tacks 
against the North wind off Point au Reyes 
and Cape Mendocino, or follow it like 
the gulls and see how the men will toss 
overboard the anchor in Nootka Sound, or 
some yet unnamed Alaskan bay with a 
bosom of the ocean's blue, and lining of 
wholesome forest of the emerald's green, 
bounded with lofty ribs of glacial snow. 

The origin of the expedition is as fol- 
lows : Several years ago a few men were 
sent ashore from a vessel for fresh water at 
some out of the way place, several hund- 
red miles north of Sitka. In the stream 
from which they obtained their supply, 
they found a quantity of qnartz, of which 
they brought away a few samples. When 
these specimens were assayed at the Sand- 
wich Islands and in this city, they were 
found to be exceedingly rich in gold. Sev- 
eral unsuccessful voyages have already 
been made to re-discover this El Dorado, 
and the party are in possession of addi- 
tional information. 

The Summer Cloud cleared for a fishing 
and hunting excursion. She was fully 
supplied with an outfit of stores, mining 
tools, fishing tackle, and such articles of 
merchandise as are generally required for 
trading with the natives for furs. Whether 
they discover gold or not, the adventurers 
intend to make a paying voyage of it, by 
fishing and trading. Unless captured by 
the treacherous Indians, a risk not small on 
those aboriginal shores, the expedition will 
return in about four months. 



Death op Justus Adelbeeg. — This ac- 
complished mining engineer, late member 
of the firm of Adelberg & Raymond, died 
at Hoboken, on June 5th, of disease in- 
cited nine years ago by the inhaling of 
fumes of mercury, in some metallurgical 
experiments. He was born in Hesse Gassel; 
was a student and favorite of Bnnsen's at 
Marburg; at the age of 22 conducted 
a large government chemical manufactory 
at Hanover, and in 1848 joined the liberals 
and was of course proscribed and oblieed 
to emigrate. He lived five years in En- 
gland, came to this country in 1854, at the 
age of thirty, visited our manufacturing 
centers, and soon after married and became 
identified with American mining industries, 
iu which he has been an instrument of 
power and iisefulness. 



Repobt on the Pbecious Metals. — The 
report on the precious metal, at the Paris 
Exposition, by Prof. W. P. Blake, has been 
issued, both at the Congressional Printing 
Office, and by Putnam & Co., of New York. 
An invoice of the private edition of the 
same, neatly bound in cloth, has been re- 
ceived by Bancroft & Co. , of this city. As 
the House of Representatives have not or- 
dered any of these reports for their use, 
the Government edition can be had only on 
application to some member of the Senate. 



Valuable data from the Nevada argen- 
tiferous limestone districts, will be found 
in the communication of " Las Minas," on 
the second page of t'ris issue. 



Mechanics' Institute-Quarterly Meeting. 

The regular quarterly meeting of the 
Mechanics' Institute was held on Thursday 
evening, at their rooms on Sutter street, 
President Hallidie in the chair. The reg- 
ular quarterly report was read, from which 
it appeared that the Institute has now 
1,254 members, with 12,646 books in the 
library — an increase of 216 since last re- 
port. The receipts for the past quarter 
have been $4,287, against an expenditure of 
83,936. An expenditure of $3,000 was au- 
thorized by the Institute for certain needed 
improvements and alterations in the present 
building, by which it is said the income 
therefrom may be increased $100 per 
month. 

The President, Mr. Hallidie, made a most 
satisfactory verbal report upon the prog- 
ress which was being made towards the 
coming Fair. 

Polytechnio Branch. 

Mr. Herrick reported a proposition for 
the formation of a Polytechnic Branch of 
the Institute, which was favorably received 
by the members present, and the matter 
referred to a special committee, consisting 
of W. B. Ewer, Irving M. Scott, William 
F. Herrick, and David Farquharson. The 
design of this organization is to procure 
the preparation of essays on various sub- 
jects of a useful and practical character, to 
be read at the monthly meetings of the In- 
stitute, or at such other times as may be 
deemed expedient. This organization will 
be effected, and carried on upon a plan sim- 
ilar to the Polytechnic Branch of the Amer- 
ican Institute of New York, and if properly 
conducted, cannot fail to add much to the 
interest and value of the Institute. The 
first paper will be read at the next monthly 

meeting. 

*— ■ ^ i .» 

Roach's Quicksilver Furnace. 

This furnace for extracting quicksilver 
from its ores, which has been secured by 
patents through this office, dated in April 
and July, 1866, and which has already been 
noticed in this paper, was put up some 
months since on a mine at Pecachoes, Mon- 
terey county. About ninety tons of ore 
were put through it, with a given result. 
Subsequently, as we are informed, another 
lot of the same class of ore was put through 
an ordinary brick furnace, with a less yield, 
showing a marked advantage in cost and 
yield by the use of Roach's patent. It has 
long been apparent that the present mode 
of treating quicksilver ores is cumbersome, 
expensive, and lacks thoroughness. We 
should be pleased to see the invention sub- 
jected to a thorough and continued trial. 
Mr. Coalt, who was formerly associated 
with Mr. Roach in the proprietorship of 
this furnace, has sold his interest to Mr. 

R., who is now sole proprietor. 

— — — **»> .. — * 

Pioneeb Fuse Faotobt. — Gases evolved 
from the drying of the varnish (it is sup- 
posed) on some fuse left unattended in the 
varnish room of. the Pioneer Fuse Factory 
at the Potrero ignited that combustible 
material on Tuesday; and the entire works 
were destroyed by fire. Fortunately there 
was ordered some time ago a lot of new 
machinery which has already arrived. It 
will take the place of that destroyed, and 
the factory will be on a producing footing 
again in the remarkably short time that 
burned-out San Francisco manufactories 
are wont to be reconstructed, under such 
circumstances. One is almost inclined to 
justify a little of accidental burning down 
or other misfortune, as efficient and whole- 
sale if not very profitable advertising to 
those who ought to be patrons of the man- 
ufactories in question. Loss $25,000, with- 
out insurance. 



The cotton crop, from all accounts, will 
reach or closely approach three million 
bales. The anticipations of injury to the 
crop have not been realized; and no trouble 
is now feared from lack of laborers, as the 
negroes have got their fill of politics, and 
are now ready to go to work. 



10 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 3, 1869. 



Professional Cards- 



Notice To Mining Companies. 

The undersigned offers his services to the mining public. 
Having devoted several years to the study of mining and 
metallurgy in some oi the best schools and wurlts of 
Europe and being acquainted with the metallurgical treat- 
ment of ores us uracuued on thin coast, lie is confident of 
his ability to render valuable aid to parlies employing him. 

Address, care of Mining and Scientific Press. 23v'18 



J. S. PHILLIPS, M. R, 

Examiner of Minos, etc., 

423 Washington street ;San Francisco. 

(Having had 33 years' experience in Europe and America,) 
supplies drawings and designs fur Pumping, Hoisting, 
Crushing Separating, Boasting. Chlorinizing, Milling, Lix- 
iviating, Precipitatinc, and Smelting Work*. Minerals an- 
alyzed, and advice given for beneficial treatment. Les- 
sons on the Discrimination and Assay of Minerals by Blow- 
pipe, Chemicals, Scorifler and Crucible. 4vj7tf 



JOHN E0A0H, Optician, 

Has removed from 522 Montgomery street to 
540 Washington street* 

East of Montgomery. 



JAMES B£. TAYLOR, 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 

Court Block, 636 Clay Street 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
2vl5-lqy 



GILES B. GB«T. 



JiHES M. n.AVliN. 



GRAY & HAVEN, 

ATTORNEY S AND COUNSELORS AT LAW, 

In Building of Pacific Insurance Co., N. E. corner Call- 
foinlaan Leidetdord.streots, 
27tI« SAN FRAKCISCQ. 

DR. KNOWLES, Dentist, 

HAS REMOVED FROM MONTGOMERY 
. to 331 Kearny street, west side, between 
IPine and Bush, San Francisco. 
21vitfly 



yi, MEUSSDORFFER, ^ 

HAT IklAWrUFA.CTXJItEIt 

And dealer In 

Hats and Caps 

AT WHOLESALE AJSH KJGTJLI1,. 

835 and 637 Commercial street San Francisco. 

125 J street Sacramento. 

Corner of D and Second streets Marysvillc. 

72 Front street Portland, Oregon. 

Our wholesale House, 628 Commercial street, extending 
through to 637 Clay street, San Francisco, contains always 
a most choice, and the largest, assortment in this State. 
Every Steamer brings the latest issued novelties from Eu 
rone and Now Tork, which can be found at all the above 
Stores, at moderate prices. 23vl6-3n> 

PACIFIC 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF SA.V FRANCISCO, CAL., 

Office, No. 422 California street. 

Ca.U AN^cts, Jan. 1, 18«», . . $1.5£9,740 18 
FIRE, 

MARINE, 

AM 

IMASJJ 

INSURANCE. 



AN FnA* Cisco: 
W. C. Ralston, 
A. L. TiH.bs. 
Win- Alrord, 
Jonathan Hunt. 
A. B. Korbes, 
A. G. Stiles, 
A. seligman, 
L. B. Henchley. 
Vm. Sherman, 
L. Sachs, 

James Dc Frcmery, 
J. 0. Bray, 
David Stern, 

D. 0. Mills, 

I. Friedlahder, 
Mu^ea Heller, 
H.M -"ewhall, 
G. T. La«tn , i, 
Miles D. Sweeny, 
Clias. Wayne, 

E. L. t.oldstuin. 
J. 0. E ill, 
i.loyd I'evis, 
Thus.H. Sclby 
Adam Grant, 
Alnhcns Bull, 
S. M. WiiHOH, 
I>.J. Oliver. 
W. Spnolle, 
Thos. Brown, 
Chas. Main, 
Chas. K. Futers, 



DIRECTORS: 

Oliver Eldridge, 
J. B. Roberts, 
J. C. Wllmerding, 
F. L. Weaver, 
Win. H' oner, 
J. W. Clark, 
A. Huvward, 
T. Ij- Barker, 
Alexander Weill, 
Unas. Mever. 
Chas. E.McLanc, 
M. Rosenbauni, 
A.J. Ralston. 
T. Lemmen Meyer, 
J. T. Dean. 
Nkw York: 
Louis Mcliane, 
Frederick Billings, 
Jxmes Lees, "■ 
J. G. Kelloeg, 
Wm. T. Coleman, 
Moses Ellis. 

SACKAMIt-NTC: 

fc.d;;ar Mills, 
J. ll.Carruli, 
C. T. Wheeler. 

Makysvillk: 
I. U.Jliwett. 

Toiti-am), Oregon: 
W. S Ladd, 
Jacob Kumm. 

Tikginia, Nevada: 
Wm. Sliaron. 



JONA. HUNT, President. 

W. ALVuRD, Vice President 
A.J. RALSTON. Secretary. 
ANDREW BAIKD, Marine Secrctarv. 
*v8Uf H. H BIG6L0W, Gen 1 ! Agent 



THE CHARLES HARKNESS 
Patent W a x Candles, 

Have now an established reputation on this Coast. Their 
nnlloi in quality, much superior to any Adamantine Can- 
dles, is 

"Well Known to Miners. 

They burn longer and better than other kinds, and are 
really the moat economical Candles in the market. 
FREEMAN, SMITH & CO., 

HO California street. 
Manufacturers' Selling Agent*. 21vl8-3m 



Metallurgy. 



MOSHEIMER'S 

PIONEER MINING- SCHOOL, 



METALLTJROIC WOBSS. 

Having established the first Practical Mining and Metal 
lnrgical School in the United States, I would call the at- 
tentionof gentlemen who may wish to obtain a practical 
knowledge of 

Chemistry, Assaying and Metallurgy, 

That I am prepared to teach all the above branches in les 
time than In any European School! 

I also undertako to asBay and work any kind of ore, or 
mineral substances. 

For terms, apply to JOS. MOSBTEIMER, 

Practical Chemist and Metallurgist. 

Office, 328 Montgomery street; MetaUurgic Works, 2005 
Powell street, San Francisco. 6vl8-6m 



LEOPOLD ZUH, 
Assayer and Metallurgical Chemist, 

(Formerly of the TJ. S. B. Mint, S. F.) 

Office, IVo. 611 Commercial Street, opposite 

the Mint, San Francisco. 

BULLION MELTED AND ASSAYED, 
Tne corrcctess of which is guaranteed in every respect 
*A11 kinds of Ore and Mineral tested, assayed and analyzed 
In the most satisfactory manner. 

Refers by permission to W. C. Ralston, Cashier Bank oi 
California; Messrs. Pioche & Bayerquc, Wm. M. Lent, John 
D. Fry, E. Cahill & Co., A. K. Grim, President Pacific Union 
Express Co.; John M. Eckfeldt, M. and R. U. S B. Mint; 
Hale & Norcrosa S. M. Co., and tho principal mining com- 
panies on the Comstock Lode. 26vl7-tf 



PROF. HENRY WURTZ, 

Formerly Chemical Examiner in the U. S. Patent Office 
may be employed professionally as a Scientific Expert. 
Geological Examinations and Reports, Analysis and Assays, 
etc-, e(c. Practical advice and investigations in the Chcm 
leal Arts aDd Manufactures. Invention and examination 
of new chemical methods nnd products. Address, 26 Pine 
street, Rooms 35 and 36, New Tork. Always in from 12 to 
3.30. JSP* Written communications preferred. 

Important to G-old and Silver Min- 
ers and Companies. 

PEOPESSOR WURTZ, 

Who is the Inventor and Patentee of the new and wonder 
fill uses of SODIUM IN WORKING GOLD AND SILVER 
ORES AND JEWELERS' SWEEPINGS, will furnish at the 
above address nformation in relation thereto, together 
with experimental packages of 

SODIUM AMALGAM. 

All Instructions nnd experiments elsewhere ohtained are 
spurious and unreliable. WORKING EXPERIMENTS ON 
AMALGAMATION OF OREs, Etc. Prof. W, has in opera 
tlonin New York alarge and small Hepburn Pan, ("or work 
Ihtr 1,000 or 20-lb. charges of material lor experimenta 
purposes. 3vl7-ly 



K. TAYLOR, iva. H. TAYLOR. 

ROBERT TAYLOR & CO., 

METALLURGISTS. 

SMELTING WORKS, 

Twelfth street, between Folsom and Howard, 

GA LVANIZING. 

Also, Antl-Frlctlon, Alloys for Jom-nnli, Type 

and Stamping ACetalu, Tinners and 

Plumber*' Solder, .Etc. 

BSS-The best price given for the most rebellious or re- 
fractory ores. Ores and minerals assayed and analyzed. 
ISAAC BLl'XOIU£, Agent, 
4vl8 3m N. E. cor. Washington and Battery streets. 



G-. "W. STRONG-, 

ASSAYER AXD WORKER OP ORES, 

No. 10 Stevenson street, near First,San Francisco. 

Hlphest price paid for choice lotsof'Ores, Sulphmeis, a 
say Ashes, SweepinuN, eic , etc. Students instructed inal 
brancbesot Metallurgy, on liberal terms. 
I4vl6qr. 



OCCIDENTAL 

Insurance Company, 

OP 8AK FRANCISCO. 
Ca«h. Capital, ...... £300,000 

GOLD COIN. 

Offlce S. W. corner of Montgomery and 
California streets. 

Fire aa<L Marine Insurance. 

All Losses paid In U. S. Gold Coin. 

CUR. CHRISTIANSEN, President 
B Rothschild, Secretary' 20vl7-3ra 



To Quartz Mining Companies. 

To be sold positively within the next three months— the 
MINES, ENGINE, MILL, and entire Machinery of the 
TEAieLAH, NO. 2 Quartz Mining Company, located at In- 
diana Ranch, Yuua County, consisting of— 

One steam murine, lio horse power, made by Burden, 
Brooklyn, New York. 

Two large Boilers, in complete order. 

One Eight-stamp Battery. 

One Chile. Mill. 

One Cornish Lift-Pump, 6 inches, of superior make and 
finish. 

280 leet of 5 inch Iron Suction Pipe. 

One large Water Tank. 

And also ail of the necessary machinery, with Belting, 
Feed Pumps, Hose, Turn Tables, Cars, Ropt>s, Track Iron, 
Flumes, Plates, wiili Blacksmith whop and all Tools and 
requisite implements to be found iu a large and first class 
quartz mill. 

The Company having ceased operations Intend selling off 
their efforts a.^puiilily as possible. 

Tor Particulars as to price, etc., address, by letter or 
otherwise. L. \V. CaMPEH, at Indiana Bunch; GEORGE 
B. H0RN1SH, Harvsvill«; or E. W. HASKELL. Pacific 
Fruit Market, San Francisco. 24vI8-lm 



Business Cards. 



RODG-ERS, MEYER & CO., 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

ABHKCES MADE 
On all Kinds of Ores, and particular attention 

PAID TO 

CONSIGNMENTS OF GOODS. 

4vl6-3m 



CA.KI> PICTURES, 

ONE DOLLAR PER DOZEN, 

And Photographs. Ambrotypes and Sun Pearls, by first 

class artists, at the lowest rates, 

it SILTA'S, 64, Third Street, 

Northwest corner of Mission, Ban Francisco. 

Ilvl8-3m 



NAXHAMttL OKAY. 



N. GRAY & CO., 

TJ 3V I> DE Xt Tj^BLEXIS, 

641 Sacramento St., cor. Webb, San Francisco. 



Farmers and Mechanics 

"No. S'-i ■> Saniomo Street. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Money Loaned on Keal Estate, 
H. BUTTON, President. 

GEO. M. CONDEE Cashier. 19vl6-3m 



U. S. RUCKl'Ll'V,-. GEO. LAMB. tt. GROOM. 

BTJCKELEW & CO., 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Choice Teas, Groceries and Provisions. 

5SO Market street, 

Below Montgomery street. I7vl8-3m 



W. T. ATWOOD, 



PURCHASER OP 



COPPEE OEES, BAES, MATT Etc., Eto„ 

SOt> Montgomery street, Sun Francisco. 

The highest market price paid forores assaying 10 per cent. 
and upwards i3vl7qr 



Farms and City Property. 

C. H. WAKELEE «fc CO., 

GOl CaHfornla street, S. w. Corner Kearny Btreet, buy and 
sell Farms and City Heal Estate. Parties wisblng to invest 
will nud it to their interest to call on the . 13vl8-3m 



Eump Leather. 

The attention of MINING COMPANIES, and others re. 
quiring a superior article for Hydraulic purposes, is Invited 
to the heavy Oaked Tanned Pump Leather, manufactured 
and prepared expressly by the undersicned. 




Constantly on hand and lor sale by 

GRAY, JONES «fe CO., 

Depot of the Santa Cruz Tannery, 

418 Battery St., San Francisco. 

25vl7-ly 



SULPHURETS ; 

What they are; 

How Assaved ; 

How Concentrated; 

And How "Worked; 

With ii Chapter on the 

BLOW-PIPE ASSAY OF MINERALS. 

By ATM. B ARSTOW, M. D. 

Published by A. Roman & Co., San Franclaeo. 
For sale at this O flic e.~ Price, One Dollar. 

Willi Hip Bid of Ibis Book, the miner can assay hisoira 
ores, requirihE but few materials, etc.', except such as are 
generally to be found in the interior towns. 21vlSLf 



Tor Miners, Millmen and Metallurgists. 

KUSTEL'S NEW WORK, 
CONCENTKATION 

Of all kinds of Ores, and the 

CHLORIHaTIOW PROCESS, 

For Gold-Bearing Sulphurets, Arscmurets, and Gold and 
Silver Ores generally. 



3?rioe, 



S7.50 



A liberal discount to the Trade. For sale by the Booksellers 

Scut to anj part of the United States, postage paid, 

on receipt of the prtec. Address, 

X>IE!W:E"5r «fc CO., :Pu."blisliers, 

Office of the Mining and Scientific Press, Hi Clay street 1 
lfivltf SAN FRANCISCO. 



Trades and Manufactures. 



WM. BAHTLING. 



HENRY KIMBALL. 



BABTLING- & KIMBALL, 
BOOB:BINI>EIiS, 

Paper Killers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

505 Clay street, (southwest cor. Sansome), 
I5vl2-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



JOHN r>A.ISTIEI>, 

(SUCCESSOR TO O. GORl) 

MABBLE WOBKS, 

No.421 Finest, bet Montgomery and Kearny, San Francisco 

Mantels, Monument*, Tomb** Plumbers' Slant $ 

Etc., On hand and Manufactured to order. 



J. M. STOCKMAN, 

Manufacturer of 
PATTERNS AND MODELS, 

(Over W. T. Garratt's Brass Foundry, 
S. E. Corner or Mission and Fremont sts., 

6vl4tf SAN FRANCISCO 



S-A-N FRANCISCO MIX.L.. 

HOBBS, GILMOBE & CO., 
Manufacturers of Soxes, 

Market Street, bet. lleale and Mala. 

For sale— Mahogany, Spanish Cedar, and other Woods. 
24vl3.ini 



J. J. JONES, 

CARPENTER and BUILDER, 

So. 334 .Tacksoa street, between Sansome and 

Battery, 

Stores and Offices fitted mi with neatness nnd dispatch. 
7vlS(f 

W. C. CAMPBELL. 

PATTEttN AKB MODE!, MAKF.K, 



J. F. PAGES, 

SEAL ENORAVER, 

AND MTTEK CXITTEK. 

Brass and Steel Stamps and Dies, 608 Sacramento street, 

San Fraucibco. Orders by express promptly attended to. 

6vl6 



DESKS AND OFFICE FURNITURE. 
JOHNSON~& BEST, 

Manufacturers of al) kinds of 
X>eslcs and Office Fixrnltiu*e f 

7I.T Market street, ne.iriTl.Jrtl, ap Stulra. 

Warerooms, 413 Pine street, Rusb Block, 



Agents Wanted! 

For the " American Tear llook und National 
Jlefflster," for 1809. 

Hornce Greeley's Autobiography, and other new and pop- 
ular works. S nd for descriptive circulars. 

F. DEWINO& CO, 
13vi8 3m 418 Montgomery stieet, Sun Francisco. 



«JlN FICAMCISCO 

Pioneer (Screen Works, 

JOHN W. QUICK, Manufacturer, 



Screen Punching In all its branclien, at rates reduced 
from 25 to 4n per cent less than the established rates. I can 
furnish Improved Quarlz -Screens several sizes nner than 
any Screen ever punched, giving universal satisfaction, 
and for strength, cheapness and durability are not excelled. 
Also, Punched .Screens of all sizes and fineness made from 
all Qualities ot material, for Quartz, Cement, Flour and 
Rice -Mills, etc. Screen Punching made a specialty; there- 
fore millmen forwarding their orders to me will receivo 
none but the best. Orders solicited. 

N. B — J. W. QUICK is the only competent and successful 
manufacturer of Screens in the ytate, having made Screens 
for the prlncmal nulls In this State and adjoining Terri- 
tories for many years. Quartz mill owners using punched 
Screens which have universally failed to give satisfaction, 
when visiting the city will please call a.id see me. 5vl7-ly 



Pacific Chemical Works. 

SULFHCRIC ETHEK. 

SPIRITS OF SITKE, 
AQUA AMMONIA, 
ACETIC ACIS, 

CYAStlOE OP POTASSIUM 

— AND — 
ACIDS AXD CHEMICALS OP ALL KINDS. 

FALKENAU & HANKS. 



LOUIS FALKENAU, State Assnyer. 
03J- Particular attention paid to the Analysis of ORES, 
MINERALS. METALS, etc. 8vl7 



THE GIANT 

POWDER COMPANY 

la now prepared to fill all orders for 

GIANT POWDER, 

Put «p In Boxes, either In llnlk or In Car 
trltlgea. 

General Ag-enls, 

BAHDIGAKFffi, NIELSEN & CO., 

25vl6-3m 210 Front street, San Francisco. 



July 3, 1869.] 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



11 



Unr/inceri/i//. 



Mining, 

Safety Appliances. — Tlio eccentric 
toothed safety catch, for mining cages held 
in place by guides, — to arrest fall if the rope 
breaks, — is in use at the Belcher, Crown 
Point, Chollar-Potosi, and other mines on 
the Comstock lode. At the trial of a new 
one recently, the maker, William Bray, the 
Belcher mine blacksmith, and Robert 
Bross, foreman, got in, while another man 
cut the rope. The oago fell 1 % inch be- 
fore it caught; would otherwise have fallen 
850 feet. Safety gates, to prevent cars 
from being run into the shaft carelessly 
while the cage is not there, have also been 
applied at tho Belcher mine by Daniel 
Grant, the carpenter. A stout spring cam 
at each side of the shaft keeps the gates 
closed; but the cage on coming up presses 
against the cams, and these, by means of 
connecting-rods, push tho gates open. 

Blasting. — Van Bokkelen and Smith, in 
the course of some blasting experiments in 
the Sierra Nevada mine, sunk a hole 12 to 15 
feet, and exploded in it without tamping a 
light charge of giant powder, to onlarge 
the cavity; then poured in a keg of com- 
mon powder, which was tamped with sand, 
and set off with unexpectedly favorable re- 
sults. * * A little electric machine to 
Bet off blasts lias been tried on Telegraph 
Hill. It works admirably when properly 
understood; and therein lies the sole hind- 
rance to the general employment of elec- 
tricity in the place of the slow and unreli- 
able fuse. 'Simplicity in the apparatus 
and a little schooling, should soon super- 
sede fuse altogether, in the gravel mines 
especially. * * Tin canisters coutaining 
75 to 175 pounds of blasting powder, a 
total of 1,000 pounds, were attached to the 
surface of Blossom Rock under from six 
to twenty-four feet of water, aud set off by 
electricity — and found by Lieut. Heuer to 
loosen 4S% cubic yards of rock. Never- 
theless it is deemed cheaper to drill, and 
insert the cartridge in the usual manner. 



Adams' Hydraulic Wheel. 

One of these wheels, twenty-two inches 
in diameter, is in operation in the Union 
Mining Company's claim at Port Wine, Si- 
erra County, says the Messenger. The water' 
is taken from a reservoir near the surface, 
and conveyed in a 7-iuch pipe down a shaft 
one hundred and ten feet in depth, thence 
along the side of the tunnel 2,000 feet to 
the wheel. The wheel has sliding steel 
buckets two inches square. About ten 
inches of the lower circumference of the 
wheel is enclosed in a tight-fitting jacket, 
the water acting on the buckets for that 
space only. When tho water has ceased 
to act upon a bucket it is thrown backward 
into the wheel by small cams attached to 
it, and held in that position until the wheel 
has made a revolution, when the bucket is 
again thrown forward to be acted upon by 
the water. It is adapled to great hights 
and scarcity of water. 

Items. — Santa Cruz is replacing its wood- 
en water pipes with wrought iron ones, 
joined by cast iron' couplings ; Messrs. 

Anthony & Burrows doing the work 

Wharf building in San Francisco bay is 
largely done by particular firms as a spe- 
cialty. J. A. Pulton has contracts, amongst 
which are: the wharf for T. L. Meyer, 
Santa Cruz Island, 400x24 feet, for 87,500; 
one for Ben. Holladay, at Monterey; the 
Vallejo flouring mill foundation, building 
by Pierson & Starr, for $15,000; and one 
for the Gas Company, foot of Second 
street, 130 feet long, for $5,200. .. .The 
The present Sacramento aud Yolo bridge 
is 900 feet long, cost $50,000, and rests on 
seven substantial pile piers. The Ameri- 
can river Pacific Railroad bridge, a supe- 
rior " How," is 500 feet Jong, rests on five 
pile piers truss, and cost $50,000, includ- 



ing half a mile of trestle work. The pro- 
posed Bincon Hill bridge in San Francisco 
is to be eighty feet long, and will cost 
S97, 000— public money. 

Pcdlio Surveys.— Congress has appro- 
priated for public surveys the ensuing year 
in California, $50,000; in Arizona, $5,000; 
and limited tho rates por mile for running 
standards to $15, for township and section 
lines, to $10 per mile. The Commissioner 
directs the Surveyor General to expend a 
reasonable share of the appropriation in 
California in surveying lands along the 
route of the Central Pacific Railroad, in 
mineral regions, and in other localities 
where the public interest may be subserved. 
In Nevada, ulong the Paoifio Railroad 
(Humboldt ond Landor counties) 230,400 
acres, watered by the Humboldt River and 
now easily accessible, have recently been re- 
ported by the Virginia City office as sur- 
veyed. In Oregon there is a tide of emi- 
gration flowing southwards, and the Sentinel 
calls for the survey of the Goose Lake 
country. 

School land warrants, Cherokee scrip and 
other papers giving to holders the prefer- 
ence in a certain order well understood, 
follow up the surveys wherever there is a 
valuable timber or other good land; so that 
the price received by the government for 
desirable timbered land, for example, in the 
Sierra Nevada, is not less than $5 per acre. 

Improvised Ditching Machine. — Dr. 
Parsons, of Denver, Col., uses for ditching a 
V-shaped wooden frame, twelve feet long 
and four feet wide at the rear end, 
pointed with sheet iron. After the ditch 
is plowed, a team of four yoke of oxen is 
attached, and the machine is hitched so as 
to be drawn at an angle of forty-five de- 
grees; the lower side keeping in the bot- 
tom of the ditch and the other crowding 
out the dirt so as to form an even and reg- 
ular bank. One round will open a ditch 
about fifteen inches deep aud seven feet 
wide. A team and three men will com- 
plete two miles of ditching per day. 

Paper Protractor. — An English engi- 
neer, J. Perrins, recommends to surveyors 
the use of a lithographed paper protractor, 
which not only costs less than brass, but 
can be used with greater accuracy and ex- 
pedition. The common brass protractor is 
seven to ten inches in diameter; this is fif- 
teen. Instead of pricking the bearings on 
the plan, both injuring and soiling it, on 
this any bearing may be seen and plotted 
at once. A protractor of this kind should 
lie in everybody's note-book. 



GEO. E. ROGERS, 

(Successor to G. W. Bell.) 

-A- S S _A_ Y E B , 

512 California **., San Francisco. 

J. A. MARS, Assayer. 

Orca carefully Assayed. Gold and Silver Ores worked. 

23vHi-QrlUpnr 



CAXiIFORIVIA. 

BUSINESS UNIVERSITY, 

~01 Aluntffomory Street. 

Full particulars regarding o ir Practical Coursn of Studle 
may bo had by culling at the University, or by addressing 
I7vl7qyUn E. P. UliAuU, San Francisco. 



Canvassing: 

Afjent 

Wanted ! 

A first-class Canvassing Agent can secure a good sltua 
tlon by calling at this office. 

DEWEY A CO., 
Publishers Mining and Scientific Press. 



wiiv:dm:i]l:l, 

For Sale Cheap ! 



Catlrcly New and of Modern and Approved 
Style. 

For particulars apply to or address this office. 

Rkgister voor Lkttkrs containing money addressed to 
us, or we will not be responsible. Remittances by Express 
must be in package*, prepaid. When practicable, it is besi 
to remit by draft, or order, on eome Sau Francisco bank or 
firm. 




Ayei^s Cathartic Pills, 

For all the purposes of a Laxative 

Medicine. 

Perhaps no one medi- 
cine i> so universally re- 

quired by everybody as 

a cathartic, nor was "ever 
any before bo universal- 
ly adopted into use, in 
evory country and among 
all classes, as tins mild 
hue eittcicnt purgative 
I'M. The obvious rea- 
son is, that it is a more re- 
k liable and far more efl'ec- 
f tual remedy than any 
other. Those who have 
tried it, know that it cured them; those who have 
not, know that it cures their neighbors and friends, 
ami all know that what it does once it does always 
— that it never fails through any fault or neglectof 
its composition .\ We have thousands upon thou- 
sands of certificates of their remarkable cures of the 
following complaints, but such cures are known in 
every neighborhood, and we need not publish them. 
Adapted to all ages and conditions in all climates; 
containing neither calomel or any deleterious drug, 
they may be taken with safety by anybody. Their 
sugar coating preserves them ever fresh and makes 
them pleasant to take, while being purely vegetable 
no harm can arise from their use in any quantity. 

They operate by their powerful influence on the 
internal viscera to purify the blood and stimulate it 
into healthy action — remove the obstructions of the 
stomach, bowels, liver, and other organs of the 
body, restoring their irregular action to health, and 
by correcting, wherever they exist, such derange- 
ments as are the first origin of disease. 

Minute directions are given in the wrapper on 
the box, for the following complaints, which these 
Pills rapidly cure: — 

For DyapepMiu or Indigestion, Urttless- 
nvM, L.inuu«»r and Iiomji of Appetite, they 
should be taken moderately to stimulate the stom- 
ach and restore its healthy tone and action. 

For Silver Complaint and its various symp- 
toms, milotiA Heartache, Sick Heartache, 
Jaunilice or Oroen Slcknesn, Dilioiu 
Colic and Hilton* Fever*, they should be ju- 
diciously taken for each case, to correct the diseased 
action or remove the obstructions which cause it. 

For Dynentery or Diarrhoea, but one mild 
dost is generally required. 

For Itheumnti'ou, «-oiif, Cravel, Palpi- 
tation of the Heart, Pain in the 81 fie, 
JSack and Xolnn, they should be continuously 
taken, as required, to change the diseased action of 
the system. With such change those complaints 
disappear. 

For D)ropiy and DropMcal Swelling* they 
should be taken in large and frequent doses to pro- 
duce the effect of a drastic purge. 

For SupprvMNion a large dose should be taken 
as it produces the desired effect by sympathy. 

As a Dinner Pill, take one or two Pills to pro- 
mote digestion and relieve the stomach. 

An occasional dose stimulates the stomach and 
bowels into healthy action, restores the appetite, 
and invigorates the system. Hence it is often ad- 
vantageous where no serious derangement exists. 
One who feels tolerably well, often finds thatadose 
of these Pills makes him feel decidedly better, from 
their cleansing and renovating effect on the diges- 
tive apparatus. 

JDIt. «T. C. ATEJt & CO., Practical Chemists, 
LOWELL. MASS., U. S. A.. 

Sold by all druggists and dealers in medicine every- 
where. Crane & Brlghnm, San Francisco; R H McDon- 
ald & Ho., Sacramento, General Agents. 25vl8eow4m 



Wonderful Invention !— To Housekeepers! 
NEW METHOD OF 

WITHOUT LIBOR. 
JOHN REIST'S Celebrated Patent Automatic 

CLOTHES WASHER AMD BOILER. 



CQ 



TV 



0^7>< 



/"\ .- 



-U- 



fjprili 



^ 




This Boiler Is roost effect tint, reliable, and universally 
recommended ; and Is the drat SELF-ACTING, PORTABLE 
WASH BOILER, for household purposes ever made, and 
strange to say, has never been improved, us nenrlyall oth- 
ers, 'which arc infringements," have proved total (all- 
ures. See decision U. S- Patent Office, November d, 1863. 

See its wonderful operation and you CHiinot do without 
U. WM. FRIEL, Agent for San Francisco, 

Dealer In Stoves and Tinware, 
25vl Sm 67 and 69 Fourth «i„ bet. Mission and .Jessie st 




LEA & PERRINS' 

CMiEBRiTKD 

WORC ESTE USH fRE SAUCE 

Declared by connniseurs 
to he the only 
GOOD SAUCE. -rj 

— a 

The success of ibis most ^ 
delicious and unrivalled rv 
condiment having caused " 
cortaln dealers to apply the name of "Wor- ■£ 
cestershire Sauce to their own inferior j3 
compounds, the public Is hereby informed - d 
that the only way to secure tho genuine, M 
i3 to ask lor «] 

l^ea. «& Perrins' Sauce, p] 

o 
and see that their names are upon the £ 
wrapper, lnbels, stopper, nnd bottle. pi 

So.nc of the foreign markets having been a) 
supplied with a spurious Worcestershire O 
Sauce, upon the wrapper and labels of 
which the names of Lea and Perrins have been forced, L 
and P. give notice that they hive furnished their corres- 
pondents with power of attorney to take instant proceed- 
ings against Manufacturers and Vendors of such, or any 
other Imitations bv which tlioir right mav be infringed. 

Ask for LEA .fc PERKINS 1 Sauce, aud see name on the 
Wrapper, Label. Mottle, find Stouper. 

Wholesale ana for Export by the Proprietors. Worcester; 
Crosse & Bluekwell, London, etc.. etc.; and by Grocers and 
Oilmen universally. Agents, CROSS & CO., San Fran- 
cisco. 3vlS-6m 

Patent Ofhck Reports, from 1843 to 1847. Mechanic.*!., 
are wanted for d uplicate copies ai .bis office. Parties have 
tie them for sale will pleasp. state price, and aldre^s 
DEWEY & CO., Mining and Scientific PrcsB office San 
Francisco. 





New Almaden Vichy Water, 



(CALIFORNIA VICHY WATER.) 

FROM THE SJE»JRi:iVG«, 

MEW ALMADEN, 

Santa. ClaraiCounty. 

F. Xj. A. PIO( II E Proprietor. 

O. CMA/UVIN A*eut. 

OFFICE, COO JACKJSOK STREET, 

GENERAL DEPOT: 
Corner of Jackson and Montgomery street*. 

This Mineral Water Is especially useful and very power- 
ful, not only in the course of certain diseases, but also as a 
preventive of intermittent lever, chronic rheumatism, 
gout, scrofula, general debility arising from disorder of the 
nervous system and circulation of the blood, and especially 
of the vciuoua circulation. 

It 1.- necessary to obmrve, In this connection, that, since 
the action of this water Is very powerful. It must be used In 
cases of sickness ,witu thk advicr or a physician, frr 
there are cases wh re a patient could not make use of It 
with Impunity, at least in the beginning of a course of 
treatment!*). On the other hand, the composition of Vichy 
Water renders It highly efficacious as an adjuvant to the 
action of certain medicines \> hlch, without It. could not be 
digested, and would therelore remain ineffectual. It Is a 
fact that, for some diseases, the action of this Mineral 
Water cannot be efficacious without i he use of ccrialn med- 
icines which the piivsioiAw only can properly prescribe. 
The omission of that precaution is the reason why many 
patients do not find in mineral waters in general all the 
relief they might otherwise derive from tin in. 

California 'Vichy Waier is used with success In many 
cases, such as — 

Impoverishment of the Blood; Weakness of Nervous 
System; Chronic Inflammation of Liver, Stomach, Spleen, 
Spine, Womb, Iniestlnes, Ovaries, and Inflammation gen- 
erally, when Uiere in no fever : Dyspepsia In all its si ages; Loss 
of Appetite; Bad Digestion ; Flatulency; Cot slant and Te- 
nacious Vomiting; Weakness ot certain Organs; the Indis- 
positions peculiar to Women; Frequent Uterine Hemor- 
rhage; Hemorrhoideu; Obstruction of Liver and Spleen; 
Night Sweals; Chronic Rheumatism, when without fever; 
Gout, when the patient itxttH nlle to irtiik; Gravel, BDd in cases 
of Diabetes, the New Almaden Vichy Water Isa most pow- 
erlul adjuvant to the remeuies prescribed for this terrible 
disease. 

(•) Besides Its Medicinal qualities, this Mineral Water is 
a most agreeable beverage at meals, or at any time of the 
day, pure or mixed with Water, Beef Broth, Red Wine, 
While Wine, Champagne, Brandy, Milk, etc. 

PRICE— 12 Bottles, at the General Depot, $1. Returned 
Bottles Bought lor Five Cents apiece. 

Twenty-four Half Bottles, $5. Returned Bottles Bought 
for 60 cents per dozen. 25vl8tf 



Mining Property for Sale. 

-A. T-wo Thirds Interest 



Golden Rule Mining Company's 

Claims and Mill, 
Situated In Tnolumne County, California, two and a half 
miles south of Jamestown, on the Great Mother Quartz 
Lode. A good 15-stamp Water Power Quartz Mill Is situated 
on the property, with a never-falling supply of water, as 
can be Bhown by the last four years continual running. 
This Claim has three parallel Ledges, from 60 to 100 feet 
apart, averaging from two to six feet in width, with a length 
of six hundred feet They are so situated lhat a tunnel has 
been run through them at right angles, making a surface 
drainage of from seventy to eighty feet In depth on the 
mine. The mine is well ventilated by shafts from the sur- 
face, and well timbered so tar as worked. In the mine are 
sieam Hoisting Works, capable of hoisting from a depth of 
300 leet. A force of thirteen men only are required to keep 
both mill and mine running regularly. 

On thesurfnee and flats lor a distance of 500 feet from 
these veins, the ground or surface was mined by placer 
miners, informer years, producing from two to five ounces 
per dav to the man, during the season when walercould be 
obtained, which fact goes to prove that a heavy deposit of 
ore was once contained In the cn-pplnga of these shales, 
which, by all former and present thei-rlcs of deep mine 
workings, came from below, indicating that when sunk 
upon to a proper depth, the lead will develop a mine equal 
to thu Amndor or Eureka. 

This claim has paid Its 19tn regular dividend nf $1,500 
each, during the past four years, biMdes all the construc- 
tion and oilier expense account, and has levied no assess- 
ments during the same time, and at present has on hand 
$8,000 in the Treasury, and no debrs. 

The last level. 150 feet from the surface rock, nveraged 
$7 per ton, on which was a profit of from £1 to $1 60 per 
ton. The length ot the twnshutesof ore on the east vein, 
and the only one worked upon, has been about 200 feet. 

Now I propose to sell two thirds of this valuable nroperty 
for $16,000. cash: and any party who desires to purchase a 
propertv ofthis kind— which theory lias proven thatltre- 
qulresdepih. on well known shuies of ore. for a sure for- 
tune— can obtain a chance here, providing he or ihey wl'l 
go down a sufficient depth. No purchaser is solicited un- 
less he first goes and examine the mine, or send* a mining 
engineer in whom he can have confidence, to indorse what 
he mny think proper of what has been here stated. 

For any funhcr particular-, dinct by letter to Wnj Bos- 
worth, San Francisco, I*. O. Box 1978, or at ray ofllce, room 
No. 6, over Donohoe & Kelly's Bank. 

2*vlstfqr WM. BOSWORTH. 



A Long Desired Article 

FOR CLEANING THE HEAD AND nAlR. THE CLEAN- 
ing of the head and hair has been the subject of con- 
sideration for a long time. This object will be accomp.lshed 
by using 

CAMILLE CHiMPOO, 
which not only does away with the poor soup so offensive 
to use, and so injurious to the hair, but it cleans the head, 
strengthens and: beautifies the hair, preserves the color, 
and prevents baldness. It Is cooling in nature, and can be 
used with safotv and rehanceon the smallest inranf. Price 
5' cents per ootllc. Prepared bv EMERTONi LULLLING, 
It '.I Mission street. San Francisoo, Cal. 

HEATHFIELD &. BOGLE, Wholesule Druggists, SOO 
nnd JSOS Batterv street, San Francisco, sole Age'"" fV,r the 
Pacific Coast. 2ivl8-3ra 



12 



Tl^e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 3, 1869. 



[Continued from First Page.] 
being brought on, in which less feed must 
be carried, the rake is too great for the 
feed, and the saw will descend one-fourth, 
and sometimes one-half the stroke before it 
begins to cut, thus losing that proportion 
of the cut in each stroke. To obviate 
this, Anderson's Upper Muley is provided 
with the long movable slides, P, at the bot- 
tom of which are attached the saw guides, 
D, which can be raised or lowered by the 
hand wheel, shaft and pinion, E, working 
in the rack on the slides, F. 



Programmes of Lectures at the Ecole 
des Mines. 

The Annates des Mines publishes, in 170 
octavo pages, the outline-headings of the 
courses of lectures delivered by the sev- 
eral instructors in the National Mining 
School of France, a free institution of the 
most ample proportions, and in architect- 
urel grandeur and impressiveness not un- 
worthy of the vast importance, the colos- 
sal moneyed interests attaching to the 
mineral developments of a great and inde- 
pendent nation. 

The Official Director of its studies is M. 
Gruner, formerly the Principal of the 
School of Mines at St. Etienne, fifty miles 
southwest of Lyons, and holding the same 
relative position in the coal basin of the 
Gier as Pottsville in Schuylkill County. 
Elie de Beaumont, the compeer of Mur- 
chison, Lyell and Ton Buch, is Professor 
of Geology ; Daubree, of Mineralogy ; Cal- 
lon, of Mining; Couche, of Bailroad Con- 
struction ; Dupont, of Mining Law ; De- 
lesse, of Drainage; Bayle, of Palaeontology. 
The programmes of the preparatory courses 
embrace: a. Course of analysis, mechan- 
ics, spherical trigonometry, b. Course of 
descriptive geometry and stereotomy. c. 
Physics, d. General chemistry. That of 
special courses: a. Exploitation of mines. 
b. Metallurgy, c. Doeimasy (assaying). 
d. Mineralogy, e. Palaeontology, f. Ge- 
ology, g. Exploitation of railroads and 
construction, h. Agriculture, drainage, 
and irrigation, i. Administrative law, 
mining legislation and industrial economy. 

U I ■ 4B»->*~«> 

Combinations in Labor and Capital. 

The coal regions of Pennsylvania are 
prolific of strikes, the organization of labor 
including the " whipping in," as moneyed 
combinations, " corners" and " rings," 
are the organizations of capital. An arti- 
ficial check is often sought to be put upon 
over production or glutting of the market, 
by combinations amongst capitalists or 
merchants; but fortunately, or unfortu- 
nately (?) there is no penalty for the bolt- 
ers, and the laws of demand aud supply do, 
nevertheless, reign supreme, whether it be 
labor or capital that combines. Certain it 
is that neither can ever afford to ran 
counter to the interests of the majority, 
and of the public, for the attempt is sooner 
or later sure to be paid for by a penalty; and 
herein lies the difference between intelli- 
gent management in organization, and the 
stupidity " that goeth before a fall." 

Hungerford's Concentrator for Tin Ore. 

A serious mistake in the figures of Capt. 
Kelly's statement on this subject in our last 
number, was made by our informant, by 
which 60 per cent, was made to read " 6 per 
cent." — the amount of metallic tin obtained 
out of the Hungerford concentrated ore at 
Storm & D wyer's on Tuesday of last week. 
Capt. Kelly's statement contained facts of 
considerable importance, fromwhich can be 
formed some judgment of the comparative 
merits of the Hungerford machine for tin — 
the most troublesome ore to concentrate 
without loss. Out of 3,200 pounds washed, 
1,315 pounds were saved — in other words, 
41 per cent.; and the resulting concen- 
trated matter was 60 per cent, metal, or 
within 18 per cent, of the pure oxide of 
tin, which is 78 per cent metal, and 22 
per cent, oxygen. 

Continental Life Insurance Cempany, 302 
Montgomery street, corner of Pine. * 



^Resources & developments 



Fetjit foe the East. — Beturns received 
from California fruit sent East by rail are 
thus far highly favorable. The fruit ap- 
pears to stand the trip well, and meets a 
ready sale at remunerative prices. Of 
course none but early fruit is sent, which, 
anticipating that of Eastern growth, can 
be sold at a profit. The latest shipment of 
which we have heard was a lot of water- 
melons sent from Sacramento to New York. 
Contrary to the predictions of most people, 
the shipment of fruit to the East promises 
to become a very important business for 
California. The Central Pacific Bailroad 
Company are building no less than fifty 
cars to accommodate this business, four of 
which are already finished. Special, fun- 
nel air-pump ventilators are attached to 
these ears, to insure their best possible 
condition for fruit transportation. 

T7ood by Bati,. — The question of fuel 
for the supply of our growing interior 
towns is already becoming a matter of seri- 
ous importance in view of the rapidly di- 
minishing supply of that indispensable 
article. Virginia City has met the ques- 
tion by the construction, for that and other 
purposes, of a railroad to the Truckee. 
Other large interior towns will soon have 
to adopt similar means to obtain their sup- 
ply at reasonable rates. The numerous 
stationary and locomotive engines on this 
coast, which are already numbered by 
thousands and rapidly increasing, with all 
other multifarious uses for lumber, are 
making sad havoc with our forests, which, 
in this dry climate, are not so readily re- 
newed as they are in those . countries 
more favored with rain. Some of the 
more important points in Colorado are also 
beginning to feel alarmed at the increasing 
price of fuel, and are considering the expe- 
diency of constructing railroads to supply 
their mills, furnaces and private dwellings, 
and at the same time afford other facilities 
for transportation, which are more or less 
needed. 



New Guano Island — Bad Policy.— 
Some San Francisco capitalists who own a 
recently-discovered guano island about 700 
miles west of the Sandwich Islands, and 
who naturally wish to dispose of it to other 
parties who can immediately turn it to 
profitable account, are about to sell the 
same to some English capitalists. This is 
bad policy. The time will soon arrive 
when California will need all the guano 
within her ready reach to recuperate her 
land from the exhaustive plan of cultiva- 
tion now pursued here. iDdeed, the time 
has already arrived when we should com- 
mence its extensive use. In Europe, where 
the principles of husbandry are better un- 
derstood, or at least better appreciated, the 
value of such discoveries are fully recog- 
nized; hence the movement for the sale 
referred to. We who are wasting our 
rich inheritance would do better to appear 
as buyers instead of sellers of such valua- 
ble deposits — deposits more precious than 
even the gold that glitters in our mountain 
sands. By and by, perhaps when it is 
too late, we shall become wiser. 



Agbicultubal Besockoes. — The west- 
ward progress of our agricultural interests 
affords a most suggestive fact for the con- 
templation of Calif ornians. Statistics show 
that the territory between the Mississippi 
and the Pacific, which in 1859 produced 
but 25,000,000 bushels of wheat, in 1S68 
yielded 65,000,000. Ten years ago that 
region yielded but one-seventh of the total 
product of the country ; now it yields one- 
third of the aggregate. In twenty years, 
California and the States on the immediate 
eastern slope of the Kocky Mountains will 
furnish the great bulk of the cereals for a 
population of nearly 60,000,000 within 
our own territory; to say nothing of the 
millions which will then be dwelling in the 
islands of the Pacific, on the eastern bor- 
ders of Asia, and in Europe, who will look 
to us for more or less of their breadstuff's. 



Company Iransactions . 



New Incorporations. 

The following new companies have been 
incorporated : 

Accacia G. & S. M. Co.— White Pine, 
Nev. June 28th. Capital stock, $720,000; 
shares, £100 each. Trustees: B.F.Pendle- 
ton, S. P. Jewell and B. T. Ward. 

MediasM. Co. — White Pine, Nev. Capi- 
tal stock, 8200,000. shares, $20 each. Trus- 
tees: M. S. Cobb, Paul Sneiler and Fred. 
Sneiler. 

Hercules G & S. M. Co.— White Pine, 
Nev. June 29th. Capital stock, $1,400,000; 
shares, $100 each. Trustees: F. Tassault, 
W. J. Maynard, T. G. Durning, W. E. 
Leveredge and S. H. Brown. 

Fresno Quicksilver M. Co. — Fresno 
County, Cal. July 1st. Capital stock, 
$4,800,000; shares, $100 each. Trustees: 
Wm. H. Sharp, A. G. Chanche, Charles 
Friedberg, L. Castro and E. Pascal. 

Meetings, Elections, Etc. 

West Point Silver M. Co. — White 
Pine, Nev. June 25th. President, G. F. 
Bragg; "Vice President, J. C. Wilmerding; 
Secretary, Ira Ayres, Jr. ; Superintendent, 
Bobert Barton. 

Nevada Smelting and Beduction Co. 
June 28th. President, Charles H. Gordon; 
Vice President, W. Applegarth ; Treasurer, 
Frank Drake; Secretary, David Mitchell. 

StatS University H. A. — June 28th. 

A. Stebbins (President), V. Smith (Vice 
President), Geo. Tait (Treasurer), J. 
Stratton (Secretary), J. C. De Voy, L. 
Langstadter and L. Walker. 

City Park H. A.— June 29th. Trus- 
tees: I. M. Choguski, H. W. Newbaum, L. 
Schwartz, D. P. Frank, and L. Feder. 

Imperial G. & S. M. Co.— June 29th. 
Trustees: A. K. P. Harmon, Thomas Sun- 
derland, William Sharon, A. Hayward. J. 
D. Fry, Thomas Bell and Thomas Sher- 
wood. Superintendent, B. N. Graves. 

Silver Sprout M. Co. — June 29th. 
Trustees: Nathaniel Page (President), E. 

B. Mott, Jr., A Wingard, W. N. Wade 
and A. B. Paul. T. B. Wingard, Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

Silver Vault M. Co. — Geo. O. Ecker 
(President), J. Scott (Vice President) , J. 
L. Homer, J. B. Houghton and J. W. 
Shaeffer. Joseph L. King, Secretary and 
Treasurer; and E. W. Herrin, Superin- 
tendent. 

French and Marlborough M. Cos. — 
July 1st. Trustees, J. Pinet, E. Thomas, 
L. Franconi, A. G. Chauche and A. D. 
Grimwood. 



Address Wanted.— Wc are desirous of communicating 
with Allen Oliver, lately of Jamestown, Tuolumne County, 
California. tf 



Returned.— Dr J. H. Paine, Dentist, Wadsworth House, 
No. 225 Bush street, between the Occldcntaland Cosmopoli- 
tan Uotcl8, San Francisco. 21vl7.4m 



Photography.— For Cabinet Photographs, or Enameled 
Cards, of the very best quality, you must po to the NEW 
YORK GALLERY, Nos. 25 and 27 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Every picture warranted to give satisfaction. 

i0vl8 6in B. F. Howland. 

Co-operative Union Store.— This is becoming one of the 
most useful Institutions in tile city, and the Mechanic and 
Laboring Man ful'y appreciate it. They arc now enabled 
to buy their Groceries and Provisions 20 per cent, cheaper 
than ever before, and the very best articles in the market. 
The store is located at 115 Sutter street, Lick Bouse Block 
San Francisco. 21V18--4W 



Dr. Hall has just relumed from Europe afler an absenco 
of one year, during which time he has visiled England, 
Ireland, France and Germany, and has held consultations 
with the following eminent physicians : Drs. Curling" 
Drutt, Lee. Parker, Acton, Aitken. Churchill. Rlcord, Vol 
peau, Boech, Spcrino, and Dewllz Many of the cases In 
which beheld consultation with ihc above named eminent 
physicians were, we are sorry to say, those of Americans. 
Americans will not now be under the necessity of leaving 
the Pacific Coast for Medical Treatment, for Dr. HALL has 
brought with him every new mode of treatment known to 
the greatest Dhyslciansof the world. To old residents of the 
Pacillc Coa3t it is needless to mention the address; tnncw 
omcrs, however, it is necessary to mention that lie may 
be found at the American Surgery and Dlspeusary, 402 
Montgomery street, opposite Wells, FargoACo's, San Fran- 
cisco. 21vl8 3ra 



Cholera— How to Cure It.— At the commence- 
ment of tile diarrhTOA, which always precedes an attack 
of the cholera, take a tcaspoont'ul of the Pain Killer In 
sugar aud water (hot if convenient), and then baihe freely 
the stomach on 1 how In with the Pain K Her clear. Should 
the diarrheca or cramps continue, repeat the dose every 
flftecn or twenty minutes till the patient Is relieved. In 
extreme cases two or more teaspoonfuls may be given at a 
dose. The Pain Killer, as an internal remedy, has n i equal. 
In cases of Summer Complaint, Dyspepsia, Dysentery, 
Asthma, it cures in one night by taking it internally, and 
bathing with it freely. Its action is like magic when ex- 
ternally applied to Bad Sores, Burns. 'Scalds, and .Sprains* 
For Toothache, don't fall lo try it. In short it is a Pain 
Killer. 

The Paiu Killer Is sold by all Druggists and dealers in 
Family Medicines. 

KEDINGTON it CO., and HOSTETTER ± SMITH, San 
Francisco, Cal,, General Wholesale Agents. jylin 



New Advertisements. 



JUST PUBLISHED ON THE 

TREATMENT OF REBELLIOUS 

SILVER ORES 

— BY— 
AM A Lt) A M ATJOS, W1THOTJT KOASTIK8 

BY CHAS. H. AARON, 

Assayer and Metallurgical Client Ut. 

This Pamphlet contains 8 pages of concisely written mat- 
ter, by a practical working Metallurgist. 

Published hy DEWET A CO,. 

Publishers and Patent Agents, Mining and Scientific Press. 
Office, *14: Clay street. 

Tlio Trade Supplied at Wholesale Sates. 

Ivl9tf 



-R. Gr. ROWLEY, 

ATTORNEY AVB COUNSELOR AT 1.AW, 

618 Merchant street, 
Between Montgomery and Kearny. P. O. Box 2102, San 
Francisco. lvlfttf 



THE BEST WEEKLY IN AMERICA. 

TttOOBE'S RURAL SEW TOBKER, 
The largest, best and cheapest Hdkal, Litkraky and Fam- 
ily Wrkki.y, in the world, enters upon a new Hall' Volume 
July 3, and hence iW»e is the Time to Suburribt! Sixteen five- 
column pases. Employs the best talen'. Finely and pro- 
fusely iliuHirated. For example, see the splendid full p,igo 
group nfGKK. Gkant's Famous UovsKS.in Nn. tor July 3d. 
Adapted to the whole country. Combines Ability, Variety, 
Taste, Spirit, Progress and Uscfulnrs*. Circulates all over 
the Continent, and now reaches! he Pacific Slates in a week 
from date. Is noi onlv a superior Lit eiary and Family 1'npcr 
hui treats Inllyiind "ably upon Knraltind Domestic affairs, 
Science, Art, etc. Try it. and you will find that "Moore's 
Rural" la (as both Press and People say), the Best Weekly 
in America. Only S3 a year— $1.50 ior half. Ask inarf. 
M.. or address D. B\ T. MOORE, 

1yI9 2t 41 Park Row, N cw York. 



OPAULDING & BARTO, 

BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS, 

Mining and Scientific Press Office, 

J>TO, -3=14: OXjA-"Z" S.TEEET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

CARDS, 

BILL-HEADS, 

RECEIPTS, 

CIRCULARS, 

HAND-BILLS, 
POSTERS, 
LABELS, 

AND 

PRINTING OF ALL KINDS FOR BUSINESS MEN 

BRIEFS, 

TRANSCRIPTS, and 
LEGAL BLANKS, 

Neatly, Correctly and Promptly Printed. 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co ? s 

STEAMSHIPS FOR 

NEW Y0EK, JAPAN AND CHINA. 

^HSjCftt LEAVE WHARJ, CORNER OF FIRST AND 
^^^Rr:tnnaTi^rcHs.nt 11 o'clock A. M. of the 
following dates, for PANAMA, connecting via Panama Rail- 
road, with one ol the Company's splendid steamers from 
ASFINWALL for NEW YORK. 

On the lOth, 17th and 3©th of each month thai has 
30 da vs. 

on the loth, 18th and 30th of each month that nan 
SI dnys. 

When the 10th, lSlh and 30th fall on Sunday, they will 
leave on Sninrrtav preceding; when ihe J7th tails en Sun- 
day, they will leave on the Monday following. 

steamer leaving San Francisco on the 10th tonchea at 
Manzanillo. All touch at Acapulco. 

Departure of the 17th or Ifith is expected to connect with 
the French Trans-Atlantic Co.'s steamer for St. Nazntrc, 
and English steamer for SoQth America. Through tickets 
can be obtained 

The following Steamships will be dispatched on dateBaa 
given helow : 

July 9-GOLDEN CITY Cant. Wm. F. Lapldgc, 

Connecting with ALASKA, Capt. Gray 

j„ly 17— MONTANA Capt E. S. Finis worth. 

Connecting with HENRY CHAUNCEY.Capt. Co-iimi. 

July 30-CO1.OR ADO Capt. Wm. H. Parker, 

Connecting with AUJZuNA, Capt. Maury. 

Passengers berthed through. Baggage chcckec through. 
One hundred pounds allowed each adult. 

An experienced Surgeon on board. Medicine and attend- 

Thcse steamers will positively sail at 11 o'clock. Passcn- 
gersare requested to have their baggage on board bciore lu 
o'clock. ' " " ' ' 

Through Tickets to Liverpool by the Inman " ano Na- 
tional " Steamship Lines, can be obtained at the office of 
the P. M. S. S. Co., San Francisco, where may also be ob- 
tained orders for passage from Liverpool or Southampton 
to San Francisco, cither via New York or St. Thomas— if 
desired an amount of £10 to £20 will be advanced with the 
above orders. Holders of orders will be required to iden- 
tify themselves to the Agents in England. 

For Merchandise and Freight to New York and Way 
Ports. Company's Form of Bill Lading only used. 

No Freight will be received on board after 2 F. M. of the 
dav prior to the steamer's departure. 

The Steamship GREAT REPUBLIC, Capt. Ci.varly, will 
hedispatcbed tor YOKOHAMA and HnNGKONG on SAT- 
URDAY. July 3d, 1869, at noon connecting at YOKOHAMA 
with the-teamcr NEW YORK for SHANGHAI. S Uppers 
of freight to China or Japan arc requested to nlark on each 
package iis deniuaiion. 

for passage, freight and all other information, applv at 
the Paeitic Mall Steamship Go's office, corner of Sucr** 
mento and Leidesdorff streets. 

OJLrVEtt ELOKIJIOE. Antnl. 



July 3, 1869.] 



Tr\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



13 



NEW INVENTIONS. 
A New Car Brake. 

Recent experiments on the Erie Railroad 
have demonstrated the utility of a newly 
applied power for stopping trains, which 
secures highly satisfactory results as a pre- 
ventive of accidents. 

The compressed air brake places the en- 
tire train under the sole control of the en- 
gineer, who is able to bring his train to a 
full stop within a distance of six hundred 
feet while going at the rate of twenty-five 
miles an hour. 

The element of power is simply pnreair, 
which at the will of the engineer is forced 
into the cylinders, forming a "cushion," 
which becomos harder with each revolu- 
tion, and the retarding force is conse- 
quently rapidly multiplied. At the same 
time, while the power of the engine is ex- 
erted to oppose the motion of the train, the 
air is forced into a special reservoir, and 
the power applied directly to all the brakes 
throughout the traiu, by means of a strong 
india-rubber tube, passing under the cars 
and fitted with double valves at the coup- 
lings, so that any number of the cars may- 
be detached and switched off without dis- 
arranging the air apparatus of the cars re- 
maining attached to the locomotive. 

The invention above alluded to is no 
doubt an important one, but it does not 
appear to be as effective for stopping the 
train as Loughridge's self-acting car brake, 
by which trains traveling at the rate of 
thirty miles per hour have frequently been 
Btopped within 350 feet, when the brakes 
are shod with cast iron, and within 250 feet 
when wooden shoes are used. Lough- 
ridge's brake also presents another feature 
not accomplished by any other brake, viz., 
the facility with which it can be applied, 
not only by the engineer, but by any pas- 
senger in any car of the train, and is so 
arranged as to allow the applying of 
every brake in the train or of each car, in- 
dependent of all the rest. 

An Active Inventob. — Joseph Dixon of 
Jersey City, whose death is chronicled, at 
the age of seventy-one, was the inventor of 
a machine to cut files; of the photo-litho- 
graphic process; of methods of printing in 
colors, making collodion, and grinding 
lenses; of. the anti-friction metal that has 
been for a great many years known as 
"Babbit Metal;" of the process of steel 
melting in use in this country, etc. He 
learned the printer's trade, afterward that 
of wood engraving, then lithography, and 
afterward studied medicine, and in that 
connection beoame interested in chemistry, 
becoming finally one of the most accom- 
plished and comprehensive chemists in the 
country. He was a thorough optician, and 
had scarcely an equal in his knowledge of 
photography. 

Improved Locomotive Smoke Stack. — 
Mr. J. W. Bowker, of Sacramento, a vete- 
ran engineer on the Pacific Railroad, has 
invented an improved smoke stack for lo- 
comotives and other engines, which, ac- 
cording to the Sacramento Reporter, has 
been thoroughly tested and found emi- 
nently practicable. It was recently at- 
tached to a locomotive of the C. P. R. R., 
which made a trip to Rocklin, and on 
which occasion, according to the Reporter, 
three pairs of keen eyes failed either to see 
one spark escape or catch even a cinder in 
either eye. It is also said to be a great 
economizer of fuel. A patent for the in- 
vention has been applied for through the 
Mining and Scientific Pbess Patent 
Agency. 

New Stamp Guide. — Mr. Chas. A. H. 
Rice, of Gilpiu County, Colorado, has in- 
vented what he calls a " universal stamp 
guide," consisting of a cast iron plate with 
three movable wooden slides which pre- 
sent their concave ends to the stem of the 
stamp. They are so arranged that they 
can be moved up, as they wear away and 
held to their place by a set screw. When 
the wood is worn out, it can readily 
be replaced, and being of wood, causes 
little or no wear upon the stems. The 
Colorado City Register, of June 10th, says 
that some 800 of these guides had already 
been bargained for, for use in that vicinity. I 



The Australian Colonies. 

Eds. Press : — Of all ttaoso Colonics, Victoria 
is, I boliove, the smallest, Tasmania only ex- 
cepted ; but it is by fur the most important. Its 
population is larger, richer auJ more enterprising 
than any other. We havo one main line of rail- 
way through the center of the Colony, from the 
seaboard to its northern boundary — from Mel- 
bourne to Ecbuca. There is now about to be 
constructed another main line from Melbourne to 
our northeastern boundary, the first lino being 160 
miles long, and the latter will bo about 180. 

Our principal products aro gold and wool, al- 
though of late years a great deal of land has 
been used to produco grain, and now the vine is 
being cultivated to some exteut. Factories also 
are beginning to spring up, and I nm happy to 
say that it appoars to me that a very prosperous 
future lies before us. 

You will sco by the list of Patents that there is 
a large proportion of them which havo reference 
to the gold-producing interest, as there is always a 
field for such inventions here. 

Inventions of agricultural implements (we want 
now a good shcep-sbeuriug machine^, methods for 
preserving meat, making wine, etc., would have a 
fair chance here. 

New Sooth Wales is next in importance to 
this Colony ; but the people are slowor and more 
prejudiced as a rule. They have some good gold 
fields, but the aggregate is not to be compared 
with Victoria. A large proportion of the Colony 
is used for grazing purposes. They have large 
coal fields, but grow very little corn. 

New Zealand is next in importance. Their 
principal products are gold and grain (although 
nota great deal of the latter). 

Sooth Australia follows, and is a very large 
grain-producing Colony, with some first-rate cop- 
per mines. They are also the largest wine pro- 
ducers. 

Queensland is a yonng Colony. So far it 
has been used principally for grazing purposes, 
although gold has been found ia several places ; 
but the place'is new as yet. 

Tasmania is famous, I believe, only for its 
convict establishment and its healthy climato. 

To Eejected Applicants for Patents. 

We betieve that under the new administration 
of Commissioner Fisher many new patents wilt 
be granted on applications heretofore rejected upon 
untenable grounds, by less sound and impartial 
judges than those now in office. Thus, while the 
chances are lessened for obtaining patents for mer- 
itless inventions, the opportunity iB increased for 
applicants to get patents on rejected cases justly 
entitled to an issue. Inventors on this coast have 
every facility through our Agency for obtaining 
just decisions on their inventions, past and present. 

Dyspeptics, Choose fob Yourselves. — 
Victims of indigestion, it is for you to say whether 
you will continue to endure the living death of 
which you complain, or awake to a new life of 
health, vigor and enjoyment. The Plantation 
Bitters will cure you. It is not more certain 
that darkness will be dissipated by to-morrow's 
dawn than that the regular use of this poteut 
medicated stimulant will relieve your every pang, 
and restore your appetite, cheerfulness and 
strength. Will you remain in the " Slough of 
Despond," weak, wretched, a prey to indescriba- 
ble torments, or will you come out of it and join 
the throng that have already conquered the disor- 
der from which you suffer, with this glorious veg- 
etable antidote I The transition is easy — the 
means agreeable — the result beyond all peradven- 
lure. *** 



Mahogany Logs, just received from Costa 
Rica, can be furnished at low rates by Hobbs, Gil- 
more & Co., Market street, between Main and 
Beale streets. *w* 



The Right Stamp! — One of our wide-awake California 
inventors (who has already received two patents through 
this office) evinces the true winning spirit in the follow- 
ing note: 

SAN Jose, Cal., June 29, 1869. 

Messrs. Dewey & Co: — A few days ago I received 
your letter apprising me of the-rejection of my case, 
etc. "Well, under the circumstances, I will just say, 
" Let' er rip f" and I will remember the indefatigable 
Zack. Taylor's advice to his Bokliers — "Pick your flint 
and try it again." I will have to try and get even on 
something else. I am satisfied you have done your duty 
as agentB. Yours, J. F. C. 



Quarterly and Monthly Editions. 

At the end of each quarter a largo number of 
our weekly ksues for the preceding three months 
are bound up in book form, which, bv special 
arrangement, are placed upon the ferry boats and 
various Btenmers leaving San Francisco and other 
ports on the Pacific Const, for free rending by the 
intelligent traveling public. The Quarterlies nro 
also i" he found in the principal libraries, depots, 
hotels, and free reading rooms of the Const. 

This, in addition to our Monthly Series and large 

weekly circulation, in akei the 1'ltESS the BEST and 

cueaiest general advertising medium throughout 
the Pacific Coast. The value of advertising in 
our columns, however, is best detertniued by those 
who havo tried it, and we respectfully refer to our 
patrons in that lino. No paper in the United 
States can boast a better cluss, and no weekly 
paper on the Pacific Coast receives as large 
a sum for regular advertising, or has more con- 
stant or long-continued customers. 



Look to your eyes — If you will see C. Mullcr, 
205 Montgomery street, you will doubtless be oble 
to see better. # 



9&-SEXD FOR FREE CIRCULAR A.VO CONFIDENTI L 
ADVICE.~em 



Minim aid Scientific Press. 

Established Mat, 1860 

ft 

DEWEY & CO., 

SOLICITORS of 

American and Foreign Patents, 

414 Cloy at., bet. Battery and Saniome , 

SAN FBANCISCO. 



Patent Cnaei of every kind Conducted. .Atten- 
tion given to ICe-l*Kii'-»., Extensions, 
Interferences, Selections, 
Appeals, etc., etc. 



ASSIGNMENTS, POWERS OF ATTORNEY, AND LETTERS 
OF ADVICE CAREFULLY PREPARED. 



Consultation, by mail or otherwise, strictly confi- 
dential. Advice free. 

Circulars containing information for inventors 
sent free. 

The inventors of the Pacific Coast, of all oth- 
ers, should be careful to patronize only well known 
responsible agents. 

DEWEY .& CO., 

Publishers and Patent Agents, No. 414 Clay street, 
below Sansome, San Francisco. 



New Mining Advertisements. 



Daniel Webster Sliver Mining Company.— Lo- 
cation of Works: While Pine District, Nevada. 
Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, hold on the thirtieth day of 
June, 1869, an assessment of fifteen cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company, payable 
Immediately, In United States gold coin, to the Secretary, 
at his office. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the thirtieth (30th> dav of July, I860, shnll be 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment shall be made before, 
will be sold on Thursday, the nineteenth day of August, 1869, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad 
vertislng and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

0. D. SQUIRE, Secretary. 
Office, 418Callfornla street, San Francisco, Cal. jy'J 



ME0HAHI0AL AND AE0HITE0TUEAL 

Drawing School 

— FOB — 

A.PFR.E IVTIOJES. 

MR. FREDERICK HELLEICT, 

An experienced Draughtsman and Teacher, ha* opened an 
Evening School at No. 414 CLAY STREET (xume entrance 
as the Mliung and Scientific Fress otHcp), where he is *iv 
lng thor jugh instructions in DRAWING to apprentices who 
are Inclined to self-Improvement. His terms arc moderate 
and within reach of the humblest apprentice; nnd we aro 
pleased to say that the enterprise is meetings with succcsa. 
1 vl8. if i 



I. X. 1.. Gold and Silver Mining Company.— Lo. 

cation of Mine: Silver Mountain District, Alpine Coun- 
ty, Cal. 

Notice.— There aro delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
tenth day of May, 1869, the several amounts set oppo- 
site the names of the respective shareholders as follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. shares. Amount. 

Evans Gonier 335 90, $135 Of) 

Bridges, Mary C. ...j H60 12^ ISIS 

Senter. Riley *5 10 15 CO 

Clark. T B .375 10 16 00 

Clark. TB : .: WW 2 X 33 75 

Lone. EM 354 10 15. 00 

Phillips, ChasC 60 JK 6 65 

Vega, Fdela 164 11 lw 5j 

Jaidin, Henry..:.. < 188 5 7 60 

Jardln. Henry 304 3 i 60 

Jardin. Henry ,....;.. ..310 \\% 18 75 

Janlin, Henry..*, 331 6 7 50 

Jardin, Henry :<S4 16 22 60 

Hepburn, James i 116 6 7 60 

Hepburn, Jumes... 153 6 7 50 

Hepburn, James 217 10 15 10 

1-1 ■in'llug, Louis 237 '28 M 00 

Culms. John 249 70 105 00 

Bolts. John 2*6 8 12 00 

Bolts, John 381 10 15 00 

Hatch. F S 312 8 12 U0 

Love, R K 275 6 7 60 

Love, R K 332 6 7 60 

Cutter, RS 366 3J£ 5 25 

Cutter, RS 384 10 15 00 

Lone. M 385 22 7-16 33 60 

Heafiy, E D 389 10 15 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the tenth (lOih) day of May, 
1869, so muny shares of each parcel ol said stock as may 
be necessary, will be sold at public auction, by Messrs. 
Olney & Co., auctioneers, No. 426 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, on Wednesday, the fourtecenih day of July, 
1869, at the hour of 12 o'clock, M., of said day, to pay said 
delinquent assessment thereon, together with coBts of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

J. CKOWNINSHIELD, Secretary. 
Office. Pioneer Hall, Montgomery street, up stairs, San 
Francisco, (y8 



San Fernando Tunnel and Sliver Mini ate Com- 
pany, White Pine Mining District. State of Nevada. 
NoTiCE.-The first Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of 
the Ban Kernaudo Tunnel and Silver .Mining Company will 
uu held ut the office of the Company, on MONDAY, the 
second day of August, 1M9, at 3 o'clock P. M„ for the pur- 
poso of electing Trustees to serve for the cnsulug year, mtd 
f»r the transaction of any other business that may prop- 
erly come before the meeting. 

BBOBOB L. SMITH, Secretary. 
Offlcc. No. 16 Stevenson Building, corner Montgomery and 

California street* 1 . 
Sun Francisco, July 1, 1869. jyg. 



Sedvlcy Tunnel and Silver Mlnlna Company. 

White Pine Mining District, State of Nevada. 

The first Annual Meeting of the Stockholder* of the 
Stockholders of the Sedgley Tunnel and Silver Mining 
Company, will be held at the office of ttie Company, on 
MONDAY, the second day of August, 1369, at 1 o'clock P. 
M., for the purpose of electing Trmices to serve for the en - 
suing year, and tor the transaction of any other butim-aa 
that may properly come before the mectine. 

OEOROE L. SMITH, Secretary. 

Office, No. 1C Stevenson Building, corner of Montgomery 
nnd California streets. 

San Francisco, July 1, 18C9. jyj 



White Cloud Tunnel nnd Silver Mining Com. 

pony, White Pine Mining District, Slate of Nevada. 

Nqtick.— The first Annual Meeting of Stockholders of 
the White Cloud Tunnel and SU-er Mining Company, will 
be held at the office or the Company, on MONDAY, the 
second day of August, 1869, at 2 o'clock P. M., for the pur- 
pose of electing Trustees to servo for the ensuing year, and 
for the transaction of any other business that may properly- 
come before the meeting. 

GEORGE L, SMITH, Secretary. 

Office, No. 16 Stevenson Building, corner of Montgomery 
and California streets. 

Sun Francisco, July 1, 1869. jvS 

Mining Notices— Continued. 



Gold Hill Tunneling Gold and Silver Mining 

Company.— Location: Gold HllJ, Storey County, State of 

Nevada. 

The Fifth Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of the 
above named Company, for the election of Trustees to 
serve for the ensuing year, will be held on SATURDAY, 
the seventeenth day of July, 1869, at bK o'clock P. M., at 
their office, 414 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

B. WEGENER, Secretary. 

Office, 414 California sir-tot, San Francisco. je!9 



l-.wiuiiu Star, Jfo. 1, Silver Mining Company 

Location of Works: White Pino District, White Pine 

County, Stare of Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of Bald Company, held on the twenty-Afth day 
of June, 1869, an assessment of ten cents per Bhare was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company, payable 
immediately, in United S;ates gold coin, to the Secrc'tary, 
at the office of the Compauy, No. 302 .Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stoclt upon which said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on Saturday, the thirtv-tlrst day of July, 1869, 
shall be deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised 
forsale at public auction, and unless pavmeni shall be 
made bofme, will be sold on Saturday, the twenty-first day 
of August, 1869, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. By order 
of the Board oJ Trustees. 

WM. H. WATSON, Secretary. 

Office, Room No. 6, No. 302 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Je26 

Notice.— The Annual Meeting of* Stockholders 

of the "Kewanee Silver Mining Company," for the elec- 
tion of Trustees and the transaction of any other Important 
business, will be held at the office of the Company, No. 211 
California street, on SATURDAY, July 10th, isi.9, at S 
o'clock P. M. 

EDWARD BARRY, Secretary. 
June 10th, 1869. jel2 



North Star Gold Mining- Company— Location. 

of Works: Grass Valley, Nevada County, Calllornia. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of said Company, held on the fourth day of 
June, 1869, an assessment (No. 1) of twenty dollars per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay. 
able immediately, in United Stale* gold coin, to the Secre- 
tary, at the office of the Comjiuny, No. 10 second floor of No. 
402 Mmtgoniery street, San Francisco, Calllornia. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 

Said on Friday, the ninth day of July, 1869, shall be deemed 
elinquent, and will be duly adveriised for sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will be 
sold on Friday, ihe thirtieth (30th) day of July, 1869, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs nl ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

T. W. COLBURN, Secretary. 
Office, room No. 10 second floor of No. 402 Montgomery 
street. San Francisco jun5 

Silver 'Wave Mining Company, White Pine 

District, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the seventh day of 
June, 1869, an assessment of twenty cents per share waa 
levied upon the capital stock of Bald Company, payable 
immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary 
at his office. No, 416 California street. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the eighth day of July, 1869, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at 
publio auction, and unless payment shall be made hefore, 
vtill be sold on Wednesday, the twenty-eighth day or 
July, 18C!' ( to pay the delinquent assessment, together with 
costs of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the 
Board of Trustee's. 

O. D. SQUIRE, Secretary. 

Offloe, No. 418 California street, San tranclsco. jelZ 

Wllllniantlc Silver Mining Company. Location 

of works: White Pine District, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twentieth day 
of May, 1869, an assessment of twenty cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secre- 
tary, at his office, 418 California street, San Franoisco. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the nineteenth flny of July. 1869, shall be 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at 
nubile auction, and unless payment shall be made before, 
will be sold on Tuesday, the teuth day of August, 1869, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of side. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

O. D. SQUIRE, Secretary. 

Office, 418 California Street. San Francisco. je26 



Engraved to Order. — Persons who desire to illustrate 
their individual establishments or business, should give ua 
their orders for Engraving and Printing, and we will guar- 
antee good work and reasonable prices. 

DEWEY & CO., 

Patent Agents, Publishers and Job Printers, 6Q5. Clay it. 



14 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 3, 1869. 



[Written For the Mining ana Scientific Pre33. 

Perpetual Motion. 

Editors Press: — Though it is hardly to 
be supposed that any reader of the Press 
is spending his energy in..search of this ig- 
nis fatuus, yet he may some time meet with 
one who is still in pursuit of it. Each may 
have his own way of answering such per- 
sons, but can seldom convince or reclaim 
the really earnest. 

I will relate an anecdote of one of them. 
He was an old man, a good wheelwright, 
and had spent so much time on this power 
of motion, that his business left him, his 
family were in distress, and himself thought 
to be crazy. When somewhat recovered, 
his friends exacted from him a promise that 
he would never more work at his project. 
He returned to his trade, and was again 
doing well, but could not give up the no- 
tion that he had the grand discovery in his 
mind. One day he showed me a few wheels 
and levers, to give me an idea of his plan. 
He said he was pledged not to work at it 
himself, but wished some one else could 
understand and develop his idea. 

I soon perceived that he had made that 
frequent mistake — taken pressure tor power. 
When told that even if his machine should 
start, the variation of a hair's breadth in a 
thousand revolutions, would soon throw 
partsof itout of adjustment. "Of course," 
said he, " it must be made almighty accu- 
rate." '■' Yes," was the reply, that is it ex- 
actly, " Almighty accurate /" But neither 
you nor I can do that. He resumed work 
on his buggy, and never again spoke to me 
about Perpetual Motion. Jeigh Arrh. 

Trial op the Avttor. — The Call of 
June 29th, says : The aerial navigation ma- 
chine, of which so much has been said dur- 
ing the past year, and upon which so much 
labor and thought have been expended, ap- 
pears to be a perfeet success. The work- 
ing model, thirty feet in length, was tried 
near San Mateo on Sunday, in the presence 
of several gentlemen of this city, and 
worked like a charm. It not only ascended 
into the air, but while floating there, was 
readily propelled in any required direction 
by the machinery. A machine of sufficient 
capacity to carry eight or ten persons will 
be completed in six or eight weeks, and 
with it it is expected that the trip to New 
York can be made in twenty-four hours' 
time. The model which worked so satis- 
factorily on Sunday, will be exhibited at 
Bay View Park on the Fourth of July. In 
shape, the Avitor is an oblong cylinder, 
which is made to float horizontally in the 
air by being charged with gas. The front 
end is pointed, and the rear supplied with 
a rudder, by which the machine is guided. 
About one-third of the distance from the 
head to the stern, flats, or wings, are at- 
tached, one on each side, to aid in support- 
ing the vessel when in air. Under these 
flats are eleven propellers, worked by steam, 
which give the vessel a forward motion. 
The inventor and builders of the Avitor 
firmly believe that a speed of one hundred 
miles per hour can be easily attained, un- 
der favorable circumstances. 



The Cheapest Way Will, Win. — Titus- 
ville, Pa., had at one time forty hotels. 
Teamsters were their chief support. But 
a revolution came. Teamsters were super- 
seded. The right man stepped forward at 
the right moment, and spoke the word of 
common sense — always a danger and a 
menace to old routine. "Instead of all 
this clatter and hubbub of wagons and 
whips and oaths, in carrying loads of bar- 
rels over land, why not," said he, " send 
the oil silently flowing underground, 
through pipes, like so much Croton Water?" 
The reform was of course opposed — as all 
such reforms must be at the outset— by the 
class whose interests were assailed. Mobs 
of teamsters tore up the pipes, burned the 
tanks, and threatened the lives of the pipe- 
layers. This was done repeatedly; but it 
was striving against fate. In 1865 the sys- 
tem was fairly established, in spite of all 
opposition, and now. almost the entire 
product of the oil region, amounting to 
ten thousand barrels a day, flows or is 
forced through pipes, from the scattered 
farms, to the railroad centers, and the army 
of teamsters has disappeared. A great 
saving in transportation, in whisky, and 
profanity, has been the result. — Atlantic 
Monthly. 

Earthquake in New Jersey. — A severe 
shock of an earthquake was felt in and 
about Elizabeth, N. J,, on the 11th of June. 



Machinists and Foundries. 



PALMER, KNOX & CO., 

Golden State Iron Works, 

Noa. 10, SI, S3 and SS First Street, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

UinUFACTURB ALL KIKD3 OF 

M^OHIISTEIfcY, 

.STEAM EXGIXE9 AND (tUABTZ MJT.I.8 
DUNBAR'S IMPROVED 

, 3el^-A.dj^lSti3^Lg• Piston Packing, 

Requires no springs or screws; is always steam tight; 

without excessive friction, and never 

gets slack or leaky. 

WHEELER * RANDALL'S 

NEW GKISDEK AWD AMAI.GAMATOU 

HEPBURN & PETERSON'S 

AMALGAMATOR AND SEPARATOR, 

Knox's Amnlfiamators, 

WITH PALMER'S PATENT STEAM CHEST, 

Superior (or working either GOLD OR SILVER RES, and 
b the only Amalgamator that has stood the test of seven 
pears' continual working. 

Gtenulne "White Iron Stump Shoe* and J>le» 

Having been engaged for the past ten years In quartz 
mining, and being conversant with all the improvements, 
either in Mining or Milling, we are prepared to furnish, ai 
Iheshortest notice, the most perfect machinery tor reduc 
ng ores, or saving either gold or silver. 13vlUqy-tf 



ISA P- KAN KIN. 



A. P. BRAYTON. 



A. 0. AUSTIN. 



Pacific Iron Works. 



First a,ncL Fremont Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Having heen established since 1851, we have accumulated 
a very large variety of Gear and other Patterns, which, 
with our superior tools and appliances, give ui facilities lor 
doing drst class work uneuuuled on the Pacidc Coast. 

Among other things, we manufacture the following: 

STEAM: DEIVG-IIVES, 

Horizontal and Vertical, for either Stationary or Marino 

use. 

BOILERS— .High and Low Pressure, 

Pump, Pipe and Sheet Iron Work of every kind. 

Quartz Mill Worlt, 

Including High and Low Mortars, for wet or dry crushing ■ 

Furnace Irons for Roasting Ores; Freiberg Barrels; 

Varney's and Wheelers Amalgamating Pans 

and Settlers; Stamp Shoes and Dies of 

best White Iron; Russia Iron 

Screens, etc., etc. 

Flour Mill, Saw Mill and Sugar MiU Work in every variety; 

Pumping and Hoisting Machinery ; Hunsbrow'a 

Patent Challenge Pump, for Domestic, 

Ship and Mining use— the most 

approved and successful 

Pump manufactured. 

Casting;! of every description, Iron and Erau, 



We would call especial attention to "Wright's Patent Va- 
riable Cut-off Engines," of which we are the sole manufac- 
turers on the PxciOc Coast, under license from the Wood- 
ruffs Beach Co., Hantord, Cu As a simple, effective, fukl 
saving, nrsi-cUss Engine, this Is, without doubt, the best 
Engine made in the United States. 

Orders promptly attended to. Prices as low as possible 
for first-class work, and we intend to do no other. 

OU£>l>.VJCl> <fe CO. 

San Francisco, May 1, 1863. 18vl6tf 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY. 

No. 123 First street, opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

All kinds of Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt Metal 
Castings, Brass Ship Work of alt kinds. Spikes, sheathing 
Mails, Rudder Braces, Hinges.ship andSteamboat Bells and 
Oongsof superior tone. All kinds of Cocks and Valves, Hy- 
draulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and Coiinec- 
ious of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dispatch. 

g&* PRICES MODERATE, -ffiff 

J. P. GALLAGflTER, J. H. WEED V. KINGWELL. 

9vl3.ly 



FOTJiXIMiY HT^CXlNGrS. 

BENJAMIN" ELLIOT, 

No. 483 Brannan street San Francisco, 

Manufactures Foundry Facings constantly, lrom choice 
coals. Bituminous, packed in tight sacks. Anthracite and 
Charcoal ground together or separate, packed in whole 
or halt barrels Black Lend. Coke and Soapstone ground to 
order, f'oundrymen located far from choice material, can 
rely on having superior Facings forwarded to order. 
10vl8qr 




JAMES MACKEN, 

32« Fremont st., net. Howard *fc Folsom 

AH kinds of COPPER WORK done to order In the best 
manner. Particular attention paid to Steamboat, Sugar 
House and Distillery work. 

Kapalriiic promptly and neatly attended to. 

I3vll 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 
EUREKA EOTJ^TlDIOrr, 

129 and 131 Beale street, between Mission and Howard, 

San Francisco. 

LIGHT AKD HEAVY CASTINGS, 

of every description, manufactured 24vl6qr 



CITY IRODI WORKS COMPANY. 

CLERC & CO., 
IKON FOUNDERS, 

Steam Enctne Builders and Makers of all 
kinds of Machinery, 

6vll6qr . No. 28 Fremont street, San Francisco. 



Miners' Foundry 

—AND — 

MACHINE WOEKS 

Nos. 245 to 255 First Steeet, 

San Francisco. 

HOWLAND, ANG-ELL & CO., 

pieoritiETOKs, 

Manufacturers of Machinery for 

WAKTZ 3IIJLI.S. 
SAW MILLS, 
I'OWSJBK MULLS, 



FLOTJK MILLS, 
SUGAR MILLS, 
I'AlMiK, MILLS 



Steam Engines of all Kinds. 
Amalgamators of all Kinds. 

MHUO PUMPS, HOISTING WORKS, 

OIL WILL TOOLS, KOCH. KKEAKEKS, 



Machinery and Castings of all kinds, either 
of Iron or Brass. 

Boilers and Sheet Iron Work in all its 
Branches. 

shoes imd Ales of Whit* Iron, manufactured 
for and linttorled by ui expressly for this pur- 
pose, and Mill last sS5 per cent, longer than i.uy 
other made on this coast. 

Russia Iron Screens, of any decree offineness. 
We are the oniy manufacturers on this coast ol 
the 

HICKS ENGINE, 
The most compact, simple In construction, and 

durable, of any .Engine in use. 
W. II. HOWL .l.\ t>, H.B.AKGELL, 

Uvli-ar CTRirs PALMER. 



FULTON 

Foundry and Iron Works. 

HINCKLEY & CO., 

MANUTACTITRBRS OF 

©TE^M ENGINES, 

Quartz, Floiu? ancl ©aw Mllle, 

Hayes* Improved Steam Pump, Brodle's Im- 
proved Crasher, Mlnlnic Pomp., 
Amalifamntorii.and all kluJx 
of Machinery. 

IT. E. corner of Tehama and Fremont streets, above How; 
ard street, San Francisco. S-oj 



McAfee, spiers & co, 

XSOILER MAKERS 

AND GENERAL MACHINISTS, 

Howard st, between Fremont and Beale, San Francisco. 

Flue or Tubular Boilers, wlih plain circular or spiral 
courses. Upright Flue or Tubular HoiJcrs, Locomotive and 
and Marine Boilers, and Wrought Iron Tanks of every de- 
scription, 

Hydraulic Pipe supplied at rensonable rates. In or- 
dering, (jive the quantity of water to be supp'led, hlghtof 
the fall, and total length of pipe, so as to enable the linn to 
determine the diameter of the pipe and thickness of Iron to 
be used. 

Repairs.— Boilers, Smoke Stacks, Pipes, etc., put in re- 
pair wiih promptness. 

To Boiler Maker* and lUacbluIstH In the In- 
terior.— The firm is prepared to furnish estimates of 
Boilers, au 1 ply new Heads, drilled and punched, and attend 
to the seleciion and forwarding of Iron fur Boilers, Pipes 
and other purposes. 

Plans, Drawings and Specifications.— The firm 
is prepared 10 make out Plans and Specifications, teceive 
estimates, and superintend the Erection of any Machinery 
that may be entrusted to their care 

To Inventors.— The firm is prepared to assist in de- 
veloping the plans of those who have the ideas but not the 
practical experience necessary to put the same in I'orni, by 
mukhiii Drawings ol their Inventions, givhig tliem the ben- 
efit of their practical knowledge in the construction of Ma- 
chinery, and attending to the manufacture and introduc- 
tion of their Inventions. lvltitf 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

Sacramento, 

WILLIAMS, ROOT & NEILSON, 

MANUFACTURERS Of 

STEAM ENGINES, BOILER©, 



And all kinds of Mining; Machinery. 

Also, Hay and Wine Presses made and repaired 
with neatness, durability and dispatch. 

Dunbar's Patent Self- AdJ listing Steam Piston 



Front Street, between BJ and O streets, 

livll Saorakento City 



THE XfclSDOlV 

Iron and Locomotive Works. 

Incorporated, April 30,1868. Capital, $l,rOO t W!0. 

Location of Works, Corner Beale and Howard streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Successors to Pacific Mail P. S. Co. Works at Benlcia, OolTey 

& Risdon, and Devoc, Dinsmore & Co., hail Francisco. 

Steam Engine Builders, Boiler Makers, 

MACHINISTS AND FOUNDRYMEN. 
All work in their line attended to with promptness and 
dispatch. 



G. T. PRACY. 
MACHINE WORKS, 

NOS. 109 and HI MISSION STBEET, 
Between Main and Spear. 

New and second-hand 

Engines and Boilers, 

FOR SALE. 

Aleo one first-class Foisting 

Engine ; one Upright 

i.nBine,oi entirely 

new pattern. 

MANUFACTURES OF 

Lathes, Drills, 

And MILL MACHINERY of 
every description. 

PRACT'S 

New and Improved 
STEAM EXCISE 

BE&ULATORS, 

The best and cheapest vet In- 
vented— manufactured and 
for sale. Parlies are In- 
vited to examine it 
In practical op- 
eration. 

F. A. HUNTINGTON'S 

Shingle Machines 

on hand. 

Particular attention paid to 
Repairing. 




HUGH H. LAMOMT. 



WM. CALDWELL. 



Cyclops Engine and machine Works, 

Construct and Repair every description of 
Stationary and Alarlne Famines, MIU and Min- 
ing Machinery. 

Special attention given to Repairing Machinery. 
apl7-3m 113 Beale street, near Mission, S. F. 



Plicenix Iron Works. 




JONATHAN KITTEEDGE, Proprietor, 

No«. 18 and SO Fremont street, near Market* 
S»n Francisco. 

MANUFACTURES OF 

Fire-Proof Doors and Shutters, 

Wrought Iron Girders, and all kinds of Uousesmith work, 

Bridge, Prison 

FORGING AND MAOHINE WORK, 

IMPROVED FIRE-PROOF SAFES, 

TIEE ATO BUEGLAE-PROOF SAFES, 

Of a superior make. manufacturer of the celebrated 

MONITOR SAFE. 

BANK VAULTS AND SAFES, 

Of every description, made to order at short notice. A 

large stock of SAFES of all kinds constantly on hand. 
Agency for the ISHAM KEY REGISTER BANK AND SAFE 
LOCK, i lie only first class Lock in the 
lv!7tf United States 



PACIFIC FILE WORKS, 



t and Mission, 



No. S3 Beale Street, bet. Mark* 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Files Re-cut and warranted as good as new, -with a saving 
of fifty per cent. REAPER AND MOWER SECTIONS 
MADKTU ORDER. The only establishment on ihc Coast, 
urdcrs from the country promptly attended to. oyj- First 
i remlum awarded at th*> Slate Fair, 1R|>7 

■2vL7-ini T. O. IM ItMVfi «fc Cu 



GLASGOW 
Iron and Metal Importing Company 

Nos. 25 and 87 Fremont street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Keep constantly on hand a la>-ge stock of best Bar and 
Bandle Iron, Boiler TubeB, Plate and Sheet Iron, Gun and 
Water Pipe, Anvils, Cast Steel, Gas and Water FittiD^", 
which they offer 10 thetradeon liberal terms. 

21vifi-3m W. McCRINDLE Manage. 



5. F. Butterworth, 
Lloyd Tf:vis, 
Jas. Pollock, 
Ben. Uolladay, 



Directors: 

Cba-s. E, McLone, 
John N. Risdon, 
Joseph Moore. 



JOHN N. RISDON, President. 
Joseph Moore, Vice President and Superintendent; Chas 
E. McLane, Ireasurer; Lewis R. .Mead, Secretary; Lewis 
Coffey, Superintendent Boiler Works. 2ivl7-qy 



Removal. 

NELSON~&~ DOBLE, 

AGENTS TOR 

Thomas Firth k Sons 1 Cast Steel, Files, 

Etc., Shear, Spring, German, Plow, Blister and Toe Calk 

Steel; manufacturers of 

Mill Picks, Sledges, Hammers, Picks, 

Stone Cutters', Blacksmiths' and Horse-Shoers' Tools, 

Have removed to IS and 15 Fremont street, near 

Market, San Franciaco. 

lOvUqr 



CALIFORNIA TOOL WOEKS, 

Blacksmith and Machine Shop, 

143 Beale St., bet. Mission and Howard, 

SAN FBANCTSCO. 

All kinds of Edge or oiher Tools made to order. Par- 
ticular attention paid trj pu ting in order aGRIC' LIURaI* 
MACHINERY". Job Grinding and Polishing by aieam 
Orders lrom the Country promptly attended io *S-Ali 
work warranted. 

21vl7-qy «J. WE1CHHART, Proprietor. 



Bv Mail.— The Mining and Scientific Press will be sent by 
mail to any part ofthe civilized world. In case of removal 
subscribers nave only to inform us of the post office andreas 
ofthe old and new location, and the paper wiljbe&ent 

accordingly! 



July 3, 1869.] 



Tlc\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



15 



Machinery. 



PATENT AMALGAMATOR 

These Machines Stand L'nri vnlt- «1. 

For rapidly pulverizing ami aiiialitaniailiiK ores, they 
nave no ciual. No effort Ins b< spared to 

have Ilinn Constructed In i uuihin-r, »rul ol 

the fr** 1 number now In operation, not one tu*evarrs< 
nut red repair*. rii<* constant mid Increasing demand for 
Oiput' their intrtia. 

rhi-y tM coDSXructftd so u fa appl) *team directly Into 
t *ie pulp. <>r wliti attain bottom*. asde«lred. 

This Amalgamator Operates u Follows: 

Tho pan being tilled, the motion of the muller forces the 
pu iii tn the center, where It Is drawn down through the ap- 
erture and between the grinding surfaces. Thence It la 
thrown to the periphery Into tho quicksilver. The curved 
plate* again draw It to the center, where it puses down, 
an It., the circumference u belnrc TIiunUU conctantly 

faionK In a regular llow between the grind Ink' 'Urim'i-Kniid 
»t i the quicksilver, until the ore i.t reduced to an Impalpa- 
ble powder, nud th<; metal aiuak'aiuaied. 

ietten uuide un the tame principle excel all others.— 
They brtngYhe pulp so constantly and perfectly In contact 
with quicksilver, that the particles are rapidly and com 
a lately absorbed. 

Mill "men arc invited to examine these pans and setters for 
t leinftclvos, at the olllco, «•© Krcnnnt street, 

l»l Kan FrsnclNco. 



cuosy oo>xuiivii:o 
Heater & Sediment Collector 




This tleatcr offecttiallv prevents the collection and depo- 
sition ol m iimi'tu in Un.' bidler from impure water. From 
April 1, liW'J, tin- It tyalty on thl* lieator has liccn 
REDDOKD 43 PER CENT., 
Which enable* the Vulcan Iron Works. McAfee, Spiers A 
Co.. Khilon Iron Worse, of Sun FraDClaoo. Keep A Uargton, 
ol Stockton, and Willintni A Co.,oi ' Kncrainento, the parlies 
having the rhrht to build them, to fnmi-di these Heaters at 
greatly reduce J rates. teoud for Circulars to 

WM. B. CROSS, 

16vl8-3m Patentee. Sacramento, Cal. 



Important to every one using Steam for 
any purpose. 

CARVALHO'S 

Patent Steam Superheater 




(SKOIIONAL KND VIKW OT B01LBB, WITH SOFBRHI--AT 

Naves Fuel! Saves Water! Save* Pressure! 

Brief Extracts from letters from parties using Oarvalho's 
Superheater. Full letters can he seen on application: 
Navy Yard, Washington, June 15, 18fi0. 
"Suprcrhealcr save* 12 per cent, in fuel and 10 per cent. 
more in siieed of engine. 1 ' 

Navt Yakd, Washington, Oct, 8, 1867 (after seoen years of 
Bervlce.) 

" Superheater yet attached to boilers, and appears to bo 
in tood order." 

Uowaki) Watch ami Clock Co., Boston, May 19, 1865. 
"Superheater save* as ut least 10 per cent, in fuel and 
gives a largo Increase ot power." 

JONKa A .Smith. New York, March 21, 1867. 
" Superheater saves 2D per cent, of coal, less steam press- 
ure, exhaust more serviceable in drvim; paper " 

Stkam Kxqinb Wohk', South Brooklyn, April 23, 1867. 
"Superhealor saves not less tnan 20 percent, fuel; no 
priming!" 

UituCKKTT L either Cloth Co., Newark, N. J., Oct 16, '67. 
'• Superheater economizes 25 per cent fuel; does our 
work wuli 2.5 lb*, less pressure steam, and sieam superior 
for drying purposes." 

N. Y. Dyk no & Printing Estab,, Oct 4, 1887. 
" Superheater brings contents of our dye vats to boiling 
point In one-third less time and one-third leas increase of 
water; saves u 4 at teast 15 per cent, fuel." 
Continuous Oil Bkfiniko Co., Blnghampton, N. Y., Sept. 
20, 1867. 

" Superheaters give entire satisfaction, and we super- 
heat to 55 1 deg— an increase of 200 dug." 
OABttnrMiNor. Co., So. liadley Falls. Mass., Oct. 17, '67. 
"Superheater saves 15 or 20 per cent, fuel; steam for 
paper mill now perfectly pure and dry— an important ad- 
vantage in our business." 

Statkn Island Fancy Dyeihg Estad., June 18, 1867 
"Superheater saves at least 25 percent in fuel, and wo 
have the advantage (nardly to be over-estimated) ot per- 
fectly drv steam," 

.(Etna Iho.v Wobkh, San Francisco, Sept. 16, 1867. 
"Superheater rnives 25 to 60 per cent, in fuel; no prim- 
ing " 

Contra Costa Laundry, Oakland, July, 1858 
"Superheater causes a use ol 60 lbs. steam instead of 60 
lbs.; usemuchless water, and there is a saving in fuel." 
H*vii.ak M. Co., Cat., August, 1868. 
"Superheater canses a use ol 40 lbs. steam instead uf60 
lbs ; use much less water, und there is a saving of fuel." 
( 2 suts.) 

Sixth Mechanics' Inst. Fair, S. F. Sept 4, 18F8. 
"Superheater naed proves that It saves fully 30 per cent. 
In fuel." (Chief Engineer.) 

NkvadaMill, Virginia City. May. "SO, 1869. 
"S'iperlieater is a per ect success and saves t*u cords of 
wood in eight, or 25 per cent, in fuel; engine works belter." 

Arid many other letters of the same tenor. 
Awarded silver Mednl, Mechanics* Institute, 

San Francisco, 1868. 
Awarded Silver Medal, Maryland Institute* 
Baltimore. 



Send for Circular to vETNA IRON WORKS, San Fran- 
cisco, California. KOBT. L. HARRIs!, Agent. 
JOHN L. CONSTABLE, Engineer. 25vl8tf 



HOOT'S PATENT FORCE BLAST R0TA11Y BLOWER. 

MANUFACTURED BY KEEP & BABGION, 

At the Globe Iron Works, Stockton, California. 




*•« 

p. 

p 

o 

? £ 

<4 



KEQtrrREs 



Fifty Pep Cent. 



LESS POWER 



Than any Blower 



One of these Blowers may be 8een on exhibition at W. T. Garratt's Brass Foundry, corner of 
Mission and Fremont streets. They are also in use at the Almaden Quicksilver Mine; Gridley's 
Foundry, Gold Mill, Nevada ; ^tna Iron Works, San Francisco, and many other places. 

Caution. — Purchasers will find it to their advantage to apply direct to the Stockton Agency, as 
certain parties, not authorized to manufacture the Blower, have put in the market machines o"f inferior 
construction, which do not answer all the requirements of the genuine article. 
Quartz, Saw and Grist Mill Irons, Stenin .Engines, Horse Powers, High and Low 

Pressure Steam Engines, Steamboats and Propellers, made at short notice. 



For circulars and further information, address 



KEEP & BARG-IOIXT, 

Globe Iron Works, Stockton, Cal. 



REBELLIOUS ORES. 

THE HAGAN FURNACE. 

The above method for the purification of Rebellious Ores 
is respectfully offered to tho public. Repeated actual 
workings show that the 

HAGAN FURNACE 
Will accomplish all that the Reverberatory Process will 
do, and at an expense that is merely nominal. It has never 
failed to ireal any ore effectually. 

It has never been claimed for It that it will extract gold 
from ores which do not contain any of lhat metal. 

Parilesownlng rich but refractory veins, can treat with 
the undersigned upon (he basis of 

6VARA1VTEED RESt'LTS, 
with responsible security. For an Interview, and all de- 
sired particulars, address 

THE PACIFIC ORE CO., 
P. O. Box 1O10, San Francisco. 
June M 1869. 29?18-3m 



RANSOME'S PATENT 

Diamond Grit Grindstones, 

Warranted of Uniform Texture, 

TWICE AS STRONG AND WILL CUT AT LEAST TEN 

TIMES AS FAST AS THE BEST NATDRAL 

STONES. 

We manufacture the following qualities, viz: 
*' Hard," Tor Machinists, etc. 
"Medium," for General TJse. 
"Soft," for Wood Workers, Etc., 

Diameters, 4= to to Inches; thickness, .^ inch to 12 inches; 
and any fineness required. 

Solid Emery Wheels and Sharpening Stones, 

Of all forms and materials, 
These Stones are fastsupersealng the natural ones in En- 
gland, the tests made there showing them to cut about fifty 
(50) times Qsiast as the Newcastle, and entirely free from 
flaws, and hard and soft spots. 

"ST" Grindstones, with Frames, Iron Troughs, Shafts and 
Treadles, ready to set up In working order, for sale a 
wholesale or retail. 

PACIFIC NTOXE COMPANY, 
E. T. STEEN, Sup't., 
20vi8t f Cor. Turk and Larkln sts . San Francisco. 



Notice to Miners, 

Well-Borers and Water Companies. 

Vf PRAG IS NOW PREPARED TO MANUFACTURE 
UA. Hydraulic and Artesian Well Pipes In the beat work- 
manlike manner, and at the lowest market rates. Having 
nade Larue additions to my stock of machinery for that 
branch of business, I am prepared to fill all orders with dls- 
3atch, and guarantee entire satisfaction. I also manufac- 
ture Mississippi Stoves, of the latest improved patterns, for 
vessels of all classes. Also, Ship Plumbing done. 

8vl3.1y Stove Store. No. 1 Clay street, belowbavla. 



HO TEAMSTERS! 

CONTINUE TO 

RSfHOIMUMrc 

CELEBRATED 

H & L Axle Greasej 

To which you have givt'n so decided a 
preference fur the last 

FOURTEEN YEARS, 

It is the only reliable nrticle 

IN THE MARKET 

Every care will continue ts be used to §us- 

tain the high reputation the H & L Axle 

Grease, has so long and justly attained. 

fiS-'&e sure and ask for the H & L brand, 
and see that the 

TRADE MARK H & L 

IS ON THE COVER OF THE PACKAGE 

NONE OTHER IS GENUINE. 
FOB SALE IB EVERY STATE IB THE MOB. 



HATWAKD & COLEMAN 

IMPORTERS AND REFINERS 



Illuminating, Lubricating, 

-AHD — 

3PA.XNT OILS, 

cowsijiTixa or 

KEROSENE. LAKD, SPERM. ELEPHANT, POLAR, 

TANNERS. .VEAT8FOUT. BOILED AND RAW 

LINSEED, CASTOR AND OUINA NUT. 



Spirits of Turpentine and Alcohol. 
Lamps and Lamp Stock ! 

An elegant and complete assortment. 

SOLE IMPORTERS OF 
De-voe's Illuminating: Oil' 

PATEST CANS. 
5vl7-tf. 411 Front street, San Francisco. 



0AEL0S 0'DONNELL'S 

California Cordial Tonic, 

—OB— 

Wild Cherry Bitters. 

TRADH C. O. D. MARK. 



This elegant preparation fa acknowledged brail who have 
used It to bo the most efficient rotnedy for every disease o( 
the 

STOMAOH AND BOWELS, 

Tet Introduced to the notice of the public. Immediately on 
taking a dose of it, the patient will Hud a genial glow per* 
vadlne hia entire system, and lis steady use for a short 
time will be followed fcy a healthy appetite and a good di- 
gestion, evon In the case of the most confirmed dyspeptic . 
To alt who are suffering from 

INDIGESTION, 

DYSPEPSIA, 

DYSENTERY, 

DIARRHCEA, 

NERVOUS AFFECTIONS, 

Or any of the manifold troubles caused by a diseased action 
of the stomach, this remedy is confidently recommended 
as a safe and certain cure. 

IV. B. JACOBS Ac CO., Sole Agents. 

!Svl8-3m -Via Front afreet, SanFranclico, 



Tbe Perfection of Prepared Cocoa. 

MARAYILLA COCOA. 



Bole Proprietors— TAYLOR BROTHERS, London. 

The Cocoa (or Cacao) of Maravllla Is the true Theobroma 
of LlnniBus. Cocoa Is indigenous to South America, of 
which Mnravllla la a favored portion. TAYLOR BROTH- 
ERS having secured the exclusive supply of this unri- 
valled Cocon, have, by the Shiltful application of their sol- 
uble principle and elubornte machinery, produced what la 
so undeniably the penection ot Prepared Cocoa, that it has 
not only secured the preference of homoeopaths and cccoa- 
drlnkcrsaenerallv, but many who had hiihcrio not found 
tiny preparation to suit them, have, after one trial, adopted 
the Uaravilla Cocoa us their constant beverage for break- 
fast, luncheon, etc. 

"A8TJCCESS TTarPI£ECEJ>E»rTEI».» 

[See following extract from the Globe of May 14, 1863. ] 
"Various importers and manufacturers have attempted 
to attain a reputation for their prepared Cocoas, but we 
doubt whether any thorough success had been achieved 
until Messrs. T-tylor Brothers discovered the extraordinary 
qualities of "Maravllla" Cocoa. Adapting their pcrtect 
py-item of preparation to this finest of all species of the 
Theobroma, they have produced an article which super- 
sedes every other Cocoa In the market. Entire solubility, 
a delicate aroma, and a rare concentration of the purest 
elements of nutrition, distinguish the Mnravllla Cocoa 
above all others. For homoeopaths and invalids we could 
not recommend a more agreeable or valuable beverage. 

Sold lo packets only by all Grocers, of whom aho may 
be had Tavlor Brothers' Original Homoeopathic Cocoa and 
Soluble Chocolate, Steam Mills. Brick Lane. London. 
6vl8-6m 



International Hotel, 

JACKSON S T RE E T 

BETWEEN MONTGOMERY AND KEARNY STS., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

THIS OLD ESTABLISHED HOUSE IS IN PERFECT 
order forthe accommodation of quests. Personsseek 
lng comfortand economy will find this the best Hotel In 
the city to stop at. The Beds are new and in good order, 
and tho Rooms well ventilated. The Table will alwavs be 
supplied with the best In the market. 

Prices varying from SI SO to SS per day for 
Board and Roam. 



OSr Teams belonging to the House will be in attendance 
at all the boats and cars to convey passengers to the House 
rREE or cHi.aGS, and to any purtof the city for SO cents 

zlvl2 t IF. E. WEYGANT, Proprietor. 



AfTAffc WANTED-TWENTY MEN WITH $500 EACH— 
IjpUV/U must be men of the right stripe— to join an expe- 
dition that Is organized in this city. 



California Steam Navigation 

3iS&3 COMPANY. 



Steamer CAPITAL CAPT. E. A. POOLE 

CHRYSOPOLIS CAPT. A. FOSTER. 

" YOSEMITE 

M CORNELIA CAPT. W. BROMLEY 

JULIA CAPT. E. CONCKLIN. 

Two of the above steamers leave BROADWAY WHARF 
at 4 o'clock P. M. EVERY DAY (Sundays excepted), one 
for Sacramento and one lor Stockton, those for Sacra- 
mento connecting with light-drafl steamers for Marysville 
Colusa, Chico, and Red Bluff. 

Office of the Company, northeast corner of Front and 
Jackson streets. 

B. M. UAKTSBOBYE, 
13vU President. 



16 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 3, 1869. 



GAS! 



GAS! 



GAS! 



MACHINES! 




THIS MACHINE, 



MANUFACTURED BY THE 



Boston Union Gas Company, 



Is the result of several years of experiment and investi- 
gation, until to sum the whole, we can warrant a perfect 
machine. 

It is Simple in its -Amotion 

JLND THOROUGH IN ITS CONSTRUCTION. 

It will last a lifetime; requires not more than three 
minutes's attention a day, to wind up the weight; gen- 
erates gas just as fast as it is wanted, and stops mak- 
ing the moment you stop using it; gives the 

Cheapest, Softest, and Most Diffusive Light 

yet discovered. It will make abundant gas from a 
cheaper and lower grade of fluid than 

A\Y OTHER MACHINE IN USE, 

and works in cold climates as well as warm. Only those 
who hare used Gas Machines know what this means. 
Complete or partial failure in cold weather has destroyed 
confidence in them more than all other causes com- 
bined. 

The Union Gos Machine entirely obviates this diffi- 
culty by a simple contrivance, patented and owned 
exclusively by this Company, and by which we warrant 
each and every Machine to operate successfully in win- 
ter or summer in any climate or country. It is the 
only Machine that claims to work outdoors in cold 
climates, and the only one that fulfills the requirements 
of the insurance companies without increase of risk. 
For conntry residences you save the breakage of lamps, 
and your lights are always clean. Away from the city, a 
Gas Machine affords one of the most pleasant and valued 
of city comforts. Of the advantages of Gas Machines, 
you pay for no more Gas than you actually consume. 
People sometimes imagine tjaey do this with a machine. 
It is impossible; and the same amount of light will not 
cost one-half the cost of coal gas, besides being much 
more brilliant. 

Where the pipe is already in the building according 
to the regulations required by the coal gas companies, 
or where parties wish the entire work of piping fixtures 
and furnishing, Maehine, etc., by us, we will do every- 
thing and warrant everything. 



The following card from Mr. Atkinson, 638 Market 
street, who has been THE FIRST TO INTRODUCE this 
light in this city, will be read with interest: 

San Francisco, January 25th, 1869. 

Messrs. D, Simpson & Co., Agents of the Pacific Union 
Gas Company, 117 Sutter street— Dear Sirs: I have for 
the past two months been using the light produced by 
the "BOSTON UNION GAS CO'S GASOMETER," now 
for sale by the PACIFIC UNION GAS COMPANY, and 
am well satisfied to continue using it. I find that it is 
equally safe as city gas, more brilliant, and less injuri- 
ous to the eyes. I formerly paid to the Gas Company 
fully ion PER CENT. MORE than it now costs me to 
light my premises. Any persons who may wish to in- 
troduce this Light can call at my store, No. 538 Market 
street, and I will satisfy them as to its economy and 
merits, JAMES ATKINSON. 



ADDITIONAL REFERENCES 

Given on application to 

I>. SIMPSON &> CO., 

117 S otter Street* San FruucUco, 
A-gents for the Paoiflo Coast. 

And we cordially extend an invitation to all owners or 
agents of other 

Pat9nt G-as Machines 

To secure a place at the next MECHANICS* FAIR, 
Where the public can have an opportunity of 

INSPECTING AND TESTING 

The relative merits of all the Gas Machines on this 
coast. 

lvliHam3a] I>. SIMPSON. 



PREMIUM 



FOR- BEST CONCENTKATOB 

AWABDED EX THE 



MECHANICS 5 INSTITUTE, 1868, 

ALSO AT THE STATE FAIR FOR 1868, 

To J. HE1\DY. 




A LARGE NUMBER OF THESE 
I M :E> IR. O "V E 3D C OlSTOEIsrTRATORS 

ABE IX PRACTICAL USE ON THE PACIFIC COA9T.J 



Mb, Hendt, by diligent and practical application, has improved his Concentrators 
until they now stand unrivalled, far in advance of any yet brought to public notice. 
By recent alterations in the patterns for these machines, they are now made 
Stronger and more I>nr , at>le tlia.ii Ever. 



Office of North Star Mine, Grass Valley, Nov. 12, 1868. 
Joshwa Hendt, Esq. — Dear Sir: — I take pleasure in certifying: to the efficiency of the two last 
Concentrators ordered from you. We have run them steadily since July last, with but a very trifling 
expense for repairs. The additional length of step is a decided improvement. The first six sent to 
us have run steadily for nearly nine months, and are still doing good work. * * * The concen- 
trations from the eight pans alone much more than pay our entire surface expenses. Without them 
we should lose a large proportion by any system of concentration now in use. The eight Concentra- 
tors receive the pulp from our 24 stamps, which are crushing 1,040 tons per month. Our sales of 
Sulphurets last month amounted to 70 tons, or nearly 7 per cent, of the mass crushed. The sul- 
phurets from the reooocentration, contained about 10 per cent. sand. In addition to their properties 
as concentrators, they have done us good service as amalgamators, they having saved us the past 
month 50 ounces of hard amalgam, worth $350, which otherwise would have been lost. 

Respectfully yours, J. H.' CHOSSMAN, Supt. N. S. Mine. 



J- KtElVI>Y, Patentee- 
Office at Union Iron Works. 



Important to Assayers. 

Crucibles. 

The Patent Plumbago Crucible Co., 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

Melting Pots, Portable Furnaces, 

CRUCIBLES, and other fire-standing Goods, 
Batterxea Works, London. 
THE MORGAN PATENT CRUCIBLES have uniform 
quality, never crack, withstand the greatest heat without 
danger; heats more rapidly than any other; change of tem- 
perature hai no effect on ihein; stand on the average forty 
to fifty pourings, 

CERTIFICATES: 

Uutted States Branch Mint San Francisco, Cat, March 
12, 1869 -Messrs A. S. Hallidie A Co., Agents Morgan Cruci- 
ble:— I have carefully tested the Morgan Patent Plumbago 
Crucibles purchased from you for the U. S. B. .Mint, and 
cheerfully certify to their superiority and economy over all 
other Crueibles used by and under me. They are full? 
what you represent them, and I shall continue to u*e them 
tu preference to any other. J. M. ECKFELDT, 

Aleltcrand Refiner, U. S. B. Mint. 

Eagle Brass Foundry. 206 Fremont street, San Francisco 
12th March, 1669— Messrs. A. S Hallidie & Co., 519 Front 
street— tie n tic men:— We have used and tested the Morgan 
Patent Plumbago Crucible, ror which you are agents, and 
pronounce thcih superior to and cheaper [han anv Crucible 
used by us heretotore. GREENBERG & MOOBE. 

Messrs- A. S. Hallidie £ Co :— Wo have thoroughly and 
severely tested in every way the Morgan Patent Plumbago 
Crucible obtained by us from you, and rind them .superior 
to any ue have yet tried, although we have used every not 
obtainable in this market,Twc have none equal to the 
above, and concede your claims for them. We think they 
will average 45 pourings of brass. 

GALLAGHER, WEED & CO., 
California Brass Works, 125 Front street. San Francisco. 

Assav Oifice of H. Harris. Silver City, Nevada, April 21, 
1669-Messrs A. S Hallidie £ Co.— Gents.:— I received from 
you three Crucibles of the Morgan make, which I have 
used since theirarrivai, and tested by constant u<e. Since 
1847, when In the New Orleans Mint, I have always pre- 
ferred the Crucible of Dixo"'s make over Adus, Uautier, 
and Taunion, Mass. Yours I find to be not alone of more 
finished make, but to stand double or treble the work of 
Dixon's Crucibles. The No. 12— the smallest sent— has 
stood so far 32 meltings, and is as good and sound as when 
rectlved. Your Crucibles do not scale off like others; and 
as they are forty per cent, cheaper, I do not see why they 
shoulrt not be preferred by all assavers on account of dura- 
biliiy and cheapness. Yours respectfully, H. HARRIS. 

On hand and for sale by the Agents, 

-A. 8. 13 ALL1DIE <fc CO., 

18vl3-9p 510 Front street, San Francisco 



iBIake's Patent T HE best- pump for Boiler 

'"'' ' i "' n1, 1 Feeders, Breweriee, Sugar Hous- 

es, Tanneries, Mining and Fire pur- 
poses, etc, is Blake's 

IS PUMP 

It IS BIKVLE, COMPACT lill'l I u » IEITL, 

needB no expert to run it. and will 
etnrt at any point. Is warranted 
FontTivi under all circumstancea. 
Send for a circular. W. 0. M. 
BERRY S CO.. i h California St., 
■ Son Francisco, Cal. 




PoaTMASTKRsare requested to punctually inform us of the 
removal of subscribers of the Pkkss from their locality, 
or of neglect to take the paper out of the office from any 
^ause— when the subscriber omits that dutv himself. It is 
not our Intention to send tins iournal to anv party longer 
than it is desired. If we inadvertently do so, subscribers 
and others wnl please inform ue. 



Sheffield Scientific School 

Of Yule College, Kew Haven, Conn. 

This department of Yale College, instituted in 1840, and 
endowed with the National Land Grant In 1866, furnishes 
advanced instruction in the various branches of Mathe- 
matical, Physical, and Natural Science. 

The School Is under the direction of the President of the 
College, a Board of thirteen Professors in different special 
ties, aud six assistant instructors. 

Regular courses of study.L-ading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Philosophy, conferred by Yale College, arc ar- 
ranged as follows: 1— CUKMISTRY A.1D MlKKRAL<GV. 2— ClVlL 
E.VGlKEKRInC 3— MkCHaKICAL ESGINKKRING l-MlHIMJ 

EnGISKKU!\G AUD MeTAI-UTHCY. 5 — AGRICULTURE 6 — NAT- 
URAL History asd Gkologt, and 7— Sklkct i:dursk. 

Advanced students are alsoadnuticd to optional courses, 
and if already College graduates, arc received as candi- 

ates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition, S125per year of forty weeks. 

The Libraries, Museums. Laboratories and Apparatus, 
accessible to students, are varied and extensive 

For copies of the Annual Circular and Report, letters 
may be addressed to the "Secretary of tne Sheffield Scien- 
tific School," New Haven, Conn. 13v6-lyl6p 



HAUAZiNKS. 


Per An, 


W. E. L00MIS, 
News Dealer 

AND STATIONER, 
Southeast corner Sansome and 


Harpers 

Atlantic 

New Vork Ledger. 

Blackwood 

Hours at Home 

Good Words 


$ 4LKJ 

300 

6 00 

6 00 
15 00 






Harper's Weekly.. 
Chimney Corner... 
Literary Album... 

Loudon Society 

All the tear Round 
London III. News.. 


SCTPLIES A), I. 

F. A .1 T E E X 
PERIO DICALS 

By the Tear, Month or Number 



FJLCIFLC 

Rolling Mill Company, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Established for the Manufacture of 

RAILROAD AND OTHER IRON 

— AND — 

Every "Variety of" SSHciftiimg;. 

Embracing ALL SIZES of 
Steamboat Shaftx, Crank*, Plat on and Con- 
necting Bods, Car and Locomotive Axle* 

Htlil Frit Kit.-* 
— ALSO — 

HAlillVlElt KO IROIV 

Of every description and size 

03- Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL 
COMPANY Post Officii, San Francisco, Cal, will receive 
prompt attention. 

83- The hishes'. price paid for Scrap Iron BvHSm^n 



HELIOG-RAPHIC 

BTEEL ENGRAVING AND PRINTING COMPANY. 
E. VON EGLOFFSTETN, Supt., 
133 and 135 West Twenty ftt;h st.. New York. 
Steel Ensravinsrs produced by an improved Process at 
one third the usual rates. Portraits. Country Scats. Illus 
traled Circulars, Reproductions of Knirravincp, Designs, 
etc JNO, VINCENT HIUCINS. Sole A«ent. 

3vl8-6uU6p 058 Broadway, New York. 



W. 17. G-^lJE&1^A.'X , 'X , v 
City 

BRASS AND BELL FOUNDER 



Cor. Mission and Fremont sts., 

6AH FRANCISCO. 

Manufacturer of Brass, Zinc, and Anti -Friction or 
Babbet Metal Castings; 

CHURCH AND STEAMBOAT 

:b:ex,ij-s, 

TAVRKN AND HAND BELLS AND GONGS, 

FIRE ENGINES, FORCE AND LIFT PUMPB, 

Steam, Liquor, Soda Oil, Water aud Flange Cocks, and 

Valves of all descriptions, made and repaired. Hose and 

all other Joints, Spelter, Solder, and Copper Rivets, A-c. 

Gauge Cocks, Cylinder Cocks, oil Globes. Steam Whittles, 

HYDKAULIt" PIPES AND XOZZELS 
For Mining purposes, Iron Steam Pipe furnished with Fit- 
tines, &c. Coupling Joints of all sizes. Particular attention 
paid to Distillery Work. Manufacturer of "Qarratt's Pat- 
tent Improved Journal Metal." 

j(3- Highest Market price paid for OLD BELLS, COPPEB 
AND BRASS, -ffiff 6tt 

N. W. SPATJLDING, 

Saw Smithing and Repairing' 

ESTABLISHMENT. 




Xos. 17 and JO Fremont St., near Market* 

MANUFACTURER 07 

SPATJLDING'S 

Patent Tooth Circular Saws. 



EACH SAW IS WARRANTED IN EVERY RESPECT. 

Particular attention paid to construction of 

Portable & Stationary Saw Mills. 

MILLS FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE, 
At the lowest Market Prices 




JOHN G. HODGE & CO., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers In 

STATIONERY, 

Blank Books, School Books, 
PLAYING CAK,I>S, 

Wrapping Paper, Paper Bags, etc., etc. 

BANKS. COUNTING HOUSES. ETC.. SUPPLIED. 

Nos. SZ9 and 381 Sansome street, corner bacrnmento 

«S-Syccial attention yiven to orders irom Country Mer 

chants 2vl6eow-lfip 

Planers and Matchers, 

MOlLlinG AND TENOMKO 

machine**, 

Of the most improved manufacture, with also every 
deoenptiun 

UlCHARDSON, MeBIAM & Co'B CELEBRATED 

mfm g Machinery. 

W. O. M Berry Si Co. I U California St Snn Fruicisco 

Embracing Planers, Matchers and Mortisers, Moulding, 
Tenonin'-'. Boring. Shaping, Vertical and Circular Bepaw- 
ing Machines; scroll. Railway, Cut off and Rip Saws, etc., 
eic. Agents for the Swam-cotCo's 

Improved Portable Engines. 

Davis & Furbcr's Woolen Machinery; Blake's Patent 
Stemn Pumps; Kilburn's and Warren's Turbine Water 
Whenls. etc ,ct". 

Orfl-rs for Machinery of any kind will receive prompt 
attc-ntL n Send tor Illustrated Catalogue 

W. O. M. BERRY & CO, 

2^vI8-: j .ml6p 114 California st, San Francisco. 




A Journal of Useful Arts, Science, Mining, Farming, and Mechanical Progress. 



1IV DBWBT .& CO., 
l*i»t*-nt. Solicitors* 



San Francisco, Saturday, July io, 1869. 



VOLUME X13C. 
dumber 3. 



Table of Contents. 



Hefilep -t Cochrane'* Con- 



■i-utrut'T— HI 17 

Foreign Patents ffl 

ike '"" 

Cloud BuraU Of Nevada 

Neptunian Gratera 

Barlow's Anchor 

Metallurgical -i 

State Uulv«T«ities ... 

To Wash Flaeoa Wool 
To Correspondi-uts . . . 

Tho Avitor *> 

Letter from White Pine, in 

Chemistry of the StetefeMM 

CbloridizinK Furnace. 29 

niinilu.hlt Min. s T> 

Metals— What uro They ? 30 
Familiah Science — Cause 



Mr.i TiANi.-AL Pnor.mwa.- 



Wood BcwwManufacture; 

Safety Lamp; Cornish 
Pnmptng Engines; Boiler 

Joints, eta l'J 

BCXKHTtWlO PnOUUERS. — 
Tho BathomeUr; ZhlCO- 

nia Light; The Aurora. 19 

17 Faumini; ani» Ctaudeninii.— 
Cereals and Grasses of 
California; Artificial Fra- 
grancu of Flowers; How 
the French Fatten Poul- 
try; Rose Culture for 
Profit; The Functions of 

Qraas. etc 20 

Stock Review. — Stock Cir- 
cular; Shareholders' D' 



■li 



of Color iu Animal*: How! rectory; Markets, ete.. 21 



To Breathe; clothine, aud 

Health, OtO 18 

COKPANT TltANSACTIONa. 

Heatings, Eleotions, eti 

New Incorporations.. . 



Mining Sumaiar*. — Califor- 
nia, Arizona. Colorado, 
Idaho. Nevada, Oregon, 
audWyoming 23 

Patents aud Inventions.. 28 



Student Sentiment. 

The College Commit, a " weekly college 
and literary journal devoted to college in- 
terests, science and literature," published 
by C. C. CUatfield, New Haven, is received. 
A glance over its pages convinces one that 
the College Courant represents more than 
mere students' fancies; it is edited by an 
experienced and able hand, while the matter 
embodies as much of student impulses, 
spirit and buoyancy, as possible. College 
sentiment, where such sentiment has de- 
veloped itself, is always significant because 
most powerful in its influence upon the 
future of leading men. All who have taken 
interest in the progress of ideas, will re- 
member how the students of France and 
Germany have ever been leaders in the 
battles fought in favor of liberal and noble 
ideas. The revolutions of '48 and the pre- 
vailing national sentiment of the Germans 
especially had their origin, it is safe to 
say, in the blood and enthusiasm of the 
students in the universities of that country. 
If America has enough of life in its col- 
leges to exhibit sentiment or individuality 
of any kind whatever amongst the throb- 
bing pulses of students they are train- 
ing, that circumstance alone is a much bet- 
ter evidence of the substantial usefulness 
of those institutions to young men who 
would make the most of life, than all the 
education that is imparted to them in 
lectures and classes ; for books, with more 
efficient because practical instruction, are 
always at the command of young men of 
impulse, — that class of minds that will do 
the world's work, whether aided by extra- 
neous or general knowledge, and orthodox 
polish, or not. Minds of this class are more 
likely than not t'j appreciate the value 
of universities and colleges, therefore 
usually have profited by them in their ca- 
reer; and it is the sentiment of such, that a 
student's organ should embody, rather than 
the soulless inanities of staid conservatism, 
dictated by stranded big-wigs (zopf!) —the 
preachers or professors that never knew 
what it was to own their own souls on live 
topics of the day. 

Frcit fob New York. — A. Lusk & Co. 
yesterday received an extensive order from 
New York for fruit, to be forwarded as 
soon as possible. California fruit appears 
to be in demand in the East. 



Heslep & Cochrane's Improved Concen- 
trator. 

One of the most important operations 
connected with mining anywhere, and at 
the same time, perhaps, the most neglected 
of all, on this coast, is the concentration 
of ores; hence much interest always at- 
taches to any new invention which may 
promise to still further aid the miner in 
this difficult branch of his calling. We 
this week present our readers with some- 
thing new in this direction, — a late inven- 
tion of Messrs. Heslep & Cochrane, of 
Jamestown, Tuolumne County, Cal. The 
device is intended to receive the pulp 
from the mill, after it has passed over and 
through all the amalgamating apparatus 
which it may be deemed necessary to em- 
ploy. 



A stream of fresh water is received from 
the reservoir, D, through the perpendicu- 
lar spouts or closed boxes, F, F, at the up- 
per end of each of the series marked C, to 
tnko the place of the water which is lost 
for each box by the partial dischargo into 
the waste boxes, E, E. The sulphurets, 
mercury and precious metals are finally re- 
ceived in any convenient receptacle placed 
under the delivery trough, G. The above de- 
scription is all-sufficient to give a full un- 
derstanding of the mode of constructing and 
operating this invention, for which a pat- 
ent has been granted through the agency 
connected with this office. One of these 
machines has been in practical operation at 
Mr. Heslep's mine at Jamestown, where it 
is said to give most extraordinary results. 

To Wash Fleece Wool. 

The Scientific American has an article 
upon this subject, by Dr. Reimann, a per- 



jurious influence upon the wool. In this 
operation the olein facilitates tho produc- 
tion of an emulsion with the fat of the 
wool. Herr Schlieper always found that 
I the washing was incomplete without olein. 
The temperature employed in washing is 
of considerable importance. It depends 
upon the quality of the wool and the quan- 
tity of hydrochlorate of ammonia em- 
ployed. It can only be found out by prac- 
tice. Even slight elevations of tempera- 
ture have very considerable influence in the 
process of washing. For instance, the wool 
bears well a temperature of 122° Fah. , but 
is altered at 129° Fah. Another Mud of 
wool withstands a temperature of 115° 
Fah., but is damaged at 122° Fah., and so 
on. 




HESLEP 4 COCHBANE'S IMPROVED CONCENTRATOR. 



Referring to the accompanying engrav- 
ing, K represents the manner of construct- 
ing the sluice box employed. L is a metal 
plate made to slide back and forth so as to 
enlarge or make smaller, as need may ex- 
ist, the opening just below the plate, for 
the discharge of sulphurets, or other heavy 
matter, while the sand and lighter portion, 
with the bulk of the water passes on and 
out at the end of the sluice. The entire 
bottom of all the boxes may be lined with 
copper plates, if desired. 

Any desired number of boxes, thus con- 
structed, are arranged in a frame-work, as 
shown at C, C, C, C; D is a reservoir of 
clean water, to be used as hereinafter de- 
scribed. The pulp is received at the ele- 
vated end of the upper box, C, and in 
passing down drops its sulphurets, amalga- 
mated metals, and other heavy material 
through the slot shown below L; while the 
the chief portion of the water and waste is 
thrown over the slot and into the perpen- 
dicular box, E, by which it is conveyed to 
the waste trough, B. 

The sulphurets are discharged into the 
upper end of the next trough, C, and so 
on through the entire series, every succeed- 
ing trough being arranged and operating 
precisely like the upper ones. 



tion of which we condense : The present 
practice of washing wool with decompos- 
ing urine, objectionable in many respects, 
is kept up by manufacturers because, as it 
would seem, they are not acquainted with 
Schlieper's process, discovered 20 years 
ago. This chemist was, in 1843, superin- 
tendent of an American carpet factory. He 
instituted experiments to supply the want 
of a suitable washing mixture for the wool. 
After many efforts, he finally prepared the 
following, — which well serves the purpose 
of cleansing the wool, without injuring it : 
Powdered carbonate of soda, 20 parts; pow- 
dered hydrochlorate of ammonia, 9 or 10 
parts; olein, 9 parts. The amount of hy- 
drochlorate of ammonia is dependent on 
the quality of the wool. The finer the 
quality, the greater the amount required. 

From the mixture of carbonate of soda 
and hydrochlorate of ammonia carbonate of 
ammonia results. The soda of the carbon- 
ate is transformed into common salt (chlo- 
ride of sodium) . The olein combines with 
a portion of the soda, and is converted into 
oleate of Boda or soda soap, and a corres- 
ponding amount of bicarbonate of soda is 
formed. The bicarbonate of soda serves 
with the bicarbonate of ammonia to prevent 
the carbonate qf soda from exerting any in- 



State University. 

At a meeting of the Board of Regents, 
held on Tuesday, July 6th, Paul Pioda, of 
Santa Cruz, was elected a3 Professor of 
Modern Languages ; Ezra S. Carr, former- 
ly of the University of Wisconsin, was 
elected as Professor of Agricultural Chem- 
istry and Horticulture ; and Wm. Swinton, 
well known as a former correspondent of 
the New York Times, was elected Professor 
of Literature, Rhetoric and Logic. The 
Professorship of Mathematics will be acted 
upon at the next meeting. 

It has been determined that the Univer- 
sity shall be opened immediately, — this 
fall, — in the buildings of the present Oak- 
land College. Though operatiors are go- 
ing forward in the improvement of the 
Berkeley grounds, no plans for building 
are yet commenced being carried out. As 
soon as the same are decided upon, there 
will be a representation in the Mining and 
Scientific Pbess. The University pros- 
pectus recommended by the Committee on 
Instruction, is about to be published. 

The Howland Battery — Metropolitan 
Mill Co. — A gentleman engaged in run- 
ning a Howland's improved eight-stamp 
battery at the Kohler mill, writes that the 
mill, together with four Wheeler pans, are 
being run in a satisfactory manner with a 
seven-inch bore and ten-inch stroke Hoad- 
ley portable engine. The mill is doing 
good work. 

The same writer adds that the Metropol- 
itan miil commenced operations this week 
on their own rock. This is a new mill, 
with 900-pouud stamps and Hepburn pans. 
The company's ledge is found to be about 
forty feet in thickness, much of which, it 
is supposed, will work as high as $80 per 
ton. The Metropolitan is owned by parties 
in this city, and is under the superintend- 
ence of Mr. Johnson, a practical and pru- 
dent millman. 

A sprightly letter from "R. G." of 
Treasure City, has reached us through Mr. 
Murray's hands, the facts of which had, 
unfortunately for the communication, all 
been published previously. 

Many Flocks. — There are said tp be 
100,000 sheep in San L,uis Qbispq County. 



18 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 10, 1869. 



Communications. 



White Pine Correspondence. 

[Written for the Mining and Scientific Press.! 

Eds. Press: — Now that the money mar- 
ket is getting a little easier in the Bay City, 
and the mills have had an opportunity to 
ship convincing proofs of the presence of 
the precious metals in this district in. the 
shape of bricks, a few items in regard to 
the developments in the mines must be 
read in San Francisco with renewed inter- 
est. A great majority of the producing 
properties are already owned in your city, 
as well as a large minority of the non-pro- 
ducing and "untamed feline article." The 
Pkess has a very respectable circulation in 
this vicinity, and is received here as a 
standard of the mining business of the 
Pacific Coast. 

The history of the White Pine mines has 
been pretty thoroughly placed before your 
readers, with its lights and shadows. 
Trickery has been resorted to, and many 
swindles perpetrated ; but most of these 
have been effected where parties were them- 
selves at fault. People who buy mines be- 
cause they are offered at a small figure, 
should expect to get the worst of the bar- 
gain, and generally do; while those who 
have examined before purchasing, and then 
paid a fair price, have, in nearly every in- 
stance, secured a rich and permanent prop- 
erty. This is the case with the Virginia, 
Mammoth, Charter Oak, Pocotillo, Aurora 
North and South, Iceberg, California, Cop- 
per, Glance, Banner State, Comstock, Metro- 
politan, Pogonip, Othello, Snowdrop, Con- 
solidated Chloride Plat, and hundreds of 
other mines which to-day rank on account 
of development as second class mines only 
on account of the slight amount of work 
which has been done upon them. There 
are now a few over 10,000 locations on 
Tecord in the district; and it is safe to say 
that nearly one-third of these will, by pri- 
ority of another location on the same vein 
or deposit, or from the fact of the location 
having been made where neither vein or 
deposit existed, eventually be abandoned. 
Of the other two-thirds, more than three- 
fourths will prove paying properties if 
managed fairly. 

It is already demonstrated beyond a 
doubt that the district at large is a success; 
that the mines are legitimate paying mines. 
The Eberhardt has made its owners 
wealthy, and — telegrams and croakers to 
the contrary notwithstanding — has to-day 
as much and as rich ore in sight as has 
been extracted. The Pogonip and Othello 
will, by the time the company's mill is 
ready for operation, have at least six 
months' supply of ore on their dumps. 
They are now raising about ten tons daily, 
which will produce between $200 and $300 
per ton, and could, if necessary, put even 
now one hundred men at work on pay ore. 
The Virginia, under the supervision of 
Geo. H. Willard, is turning out rich ore in 
quantity. Pocotillo is fast proving itself a 
first-class mine, and before fall will stand 
second to few in the district. The Mazeppa 
has passed through a strata of low-grade 
ore, and is again extracting very rich chlo- 
ride. Work has been started again on the 
Battler, and fine ore the consequence. 
Both of the companies on the Aurora are 
taking ont large quantities of ore, which 
produces about $100 per ton. The Post 
Hole Co. (lessees of the Snowdrop South) 
extract about ten tons daily, which pro- 
duces about $175 per ton. 

The mills now in operation are overrun 
with ore, and the mines which are situated 
off the road have no chance whatever. 
The teamsters finding those which are ac- 
cessible easily can supply the mills, report 
for their own benefit that fact to all who 
have inaccessible property; and the mill- 
men state that they are of course ready to 
reduce any and all ore, but have just now 
contracted for all they can handle for the 
next three months. Most of the ore being 
reduced costs the owners at the rate of $50 
per ton, and they receive but 80 per cent 
of the pulp assay at that. Forty dollars 
per ton and 87 per cent, of the pulp assay 
would be a fair figure this fall, and be do- 
ing justice to both parties. Then, after 
we have plenty of mills and their machin- 



ery in good order, ore can and no doubt 
will be reduced at $25, and possibly $20 
per ton. When large lots are sent to the 
mill, by obtaining a clean-up, or, in other 
words, the bullion, instead of settling by 
the assay of the pulp, even a slight advance 
in the returns may be procured. There 
are now 128 stamps in operation ; but from 
the various faults in the machinery they 
scarcely average one ton per stamp per 
day. New discoveries continue to be made 
almost daily, and ore worth thousands per 
ton (by assay) in new places found. 

Bullion Hill, about three miles west of 
Hamilton, has quite a number of mines, 
which will be famous as the Eberhardt it- 
self during the coming month. The latest 
spot is some three miles southwest of 
Shermantown. This was discovered to be 
rich only a few days since, and even now 
but few are posted on-it. Several locations 
have been made there, and in a few days 
it will be more generally known, and a 
local excitement will follow. Rich ore is 
also being found on the west slope of the 
Base range, near the original discoveries, 
and, in fact, the people here are so excited 
over the piles of rich chloride that they are 
fast coming to believe that the rich belt is 
of the full size of the district; and as ore 
assaying in the thousands is found at all 
points, I don't pretend to say that they are 
all wrong. And, apparently, the belt ex- 
tends across the valley west to Pinto, and 
thence to Eureka district. In conversation 
with an experienced prospector just in from 
the mountains, a few days since, I was 
somewhat surprised to hear him say this 
belt ran even through the Cortez and Bat- 
tle Mountain Districts, and he could trace 
it all the way. The theory of metal run- 
ning in alternate belts is not new, yet it 
has never, in this State at least, been 
proven. 

The emigration this year will tend to fill 
the entire eastern portion of Nevada with 
prospectors; and within five years the 
whole country will be examined. Then 
geology can be studied on a grand scale. 

The outside districts find it very hard to 
procure laborers, as all seem bound to stick 
to Treasure Hill, if they starve in the at- 
tempt. The Lane & Fuller Co., of Austin, 
have lately employed men here and paid 
their passage to Austin, being unable to 
procure men nearer. They have leased the 
Metacom mill, with the privilege of pur- 
chasing if their mine proves itself capable 
of supplying it with ore. 

The bullion shipment of White Pine 
equals Austin, or rather Beese Biver, in 
its best days, even now, and will double it 
this fall. 

We shall ship nearly $300,000 for June, 
and steadily advance for at least a year, 
when a further advance must depend on 
deep work. 

The election for District Becorder takes 
place on the 20th of July, and parties in 
San Francisco should interest themselves 
in the matter. There are at present ten 
candidates in the field, among them W. P. 
Tenney, the present incumbent. Mr. Ten- 
ney has made a good custodian; the record 
books have been faithfully cared for, and 
the workmanship is indeed elegant. A 
safe has been procured for their protec- 
tion, and a fine and convenient office erect- 
ed, while deputies are kept constantly in 
the outskirts to accommodate all. Again, 
Tenney is personally acquainted with more 
locations than any other man among us. 
Confusion in the records would create liti- 
gation without end, and can scarcely be 
avoided under a new administration. It 
behooves all having interests of value here 
to attend, if possible, and see that he is 
retained another year, when things will be 
more settled and better understood. 

G. B. E. 

Treasure City, Nev., June 28, 1869. 



What Kind op Mines to Depend 
Upon. — Paradoxical as it may appear, the 
richest mines are the least, and the poorest 
mines the most profitable. North of Ne- 
vada there is but one "poor man's mine." 
That yielded several thousand dollars per 
ton at first. Now, if worked at all, it yields 
moderately. In all Nevada there is but one 
White Pine District, and even there, and 
possibly at one other locality, only a few 
mines yield $1,000 per ton. 

During the past nine years the great Com- 
stock mine of Nevada has produced $100,- 
000,000, its ores averaging about $40 per 
ton. The Haywood mine in California, has 
yielded $3,000,000, yet its ores average 
only $20 per ton. The very rich ore is apt 
to be found in pockets. But a low grade 
of ore of $20 to $40 per ton for gold, and 
from $50 to $200 per ton for silver, is more 
likely to be found in a regular, well-deficel 
mine in inexhaustible quantities. — A " Well 
Burnt but finally successful Miner," in Apple- 
tons Journal. 



J^amitiar Science. 



Cause of Color in Animals. 

The cause of the variety of color on the 
skins of animals, and on the wings and 
bodies of insects, as on butterflies, has 
long been a matter of much speculation, 
and of no little close study. It has been 
variously attributed to temperature ; to an 
afflux of blood, occasioned by the physio- 
logical action 'of certain organs situated 
near the teguments, and to the influence of 
electricity. 

Dr. Nicholas Wagner, of Paris, some two 
or three years since, entered upon an elab- 
orate series of experiments to determine 
whether or not electricity might have an 
influence in this direction. The insect 
world appearing to him the best calculated 
to solve the question, he selected a member 
of the butterfly family (vanessa urlicoe) as a 
subject for his experiments, in the course 
of which he satisfactorily determined that 
strong elements disorganized, first the pig- 
ments, next the scales, and then the mem- 
braneitself. Weak currents simply changed 
the colors, transposing red into orange and 
black into red. A still weaker current, on 
the contrary, gave rise to black spots, and 
always nearest to the very places where 
such spots naturally exist on the wings of 
the vanessa. In some cases slight changes 
were effected in the shape of existing spots; 
and in all such it was observed that the 
change of form followed the direction of 
the electric current. Bumkorff's machine 
was employed for intermittent induction 
currents ; while for constant currents he 
employed two or three of Grove's elements. 
It was hence inferred that, at least in that 
class of insects, electricity acts as an irri- 
tating agent in the production of the vari- 
ety of their color. Another series of 
experiments demonstrated the fact that 
fixed currents of electricity exist in the 
wings themselves of these insects. The 
strongest of these currents flow from the 
base of the wing to the outer margin, fol- 
lowing the middle nervure ; and other cur- 
rents, starting from the same point, cross 
each other — the colors evidently being 
modified by the action of these variously 
modified currents. 



Salt in Cooking Vegetables.— H one 
portion of a dish of vegetables be boiled in 
pure water, and the other in water to which 
a little salt has been added, a decided differ- 
ence may be observed in the tenderness, 
flavor, and, if potatoes, mealiness of the 
two. Onions are probably more improved 
by being cooked in salt water than any 
other vegetable. Much of their unpleas- 
ant smell is taken away, and a peculiar 
sweetness and improved aroma is decidedly 
apparent. Salt hinders the evaporation of 
the soluble and flavoring principles of vege- 
tables. 



How to Breathe. 

The action of respiration should never 
be carried on through the mouth. " God 
breathed into man's nostrils the breath of 
life." The correctness of the inspired 
writer of old is fully sustained by modern 
philosophy and physiology. The mis- 
chievous habit of carrying on the action of 
respiration through the mouth instead of 
through the nose, is the real origin of al- 
most all the diseases of the throat and 
lungs, and even consumption itself. Med- 
ical writers tell us that the excessive per- 
spiration to which some are liable in their 
sleep, and which is so weakening to the 
system, is mainly the result of sleeping 
with the mouth open". Whether you 
walk, sit, read, write or sleep, keep your 
mouth closed, except when engaged in con- 
versation or necessary vocal reading. 

The philosophy is this: The velocity 
of the blood through the body, and the 
heat of the body itself, depends mainly 
upon the quantity of atmospheric air taken 



into the lungs. Nature measures that 
quantity by the nostrils, not by the month. 
When the mouth is employed the measure 
is too great; but just sufficient when the 
nostrils are used. An excess of air over- 
heats the body, while its passage through 
the mouth otherwise injuriously affects the 
throat. The habits of children, in this 
respect, should be carefully watched and 
regulated. Open mouths produce a vacant 
and unseemly appearance, and may be re- 
garded as very sure precursors of habitual 
colds and sore throats. 



Clothing and Health. 

Many lives are lost every year by an in- 
judicious use, or rather change of clothing. 
It is always safe to put on additional cloth- 
ing; but the greatest care should be taken 
in reducing it— either for the season or for 
the day. The use of flannel should become 
more general and more persistent. It is 
safe, nay, it would be beneficial to the 
health of every person to wear flannel un- 
derclothing, the year round — of course 
using thinner material in summer. It 
should be changed often, however, espe- 
cially in summer. No doubt scores, if not 
hundreds of lives are lost every year in 
this city by sitting in cold rooms morning 
and evening. Fires should be more gen- 
erally used here. Health is always en- 
dangered when chilliness comes over the 
system. Children are thereby exposed to 
the croup and other kinds of illness, and 
old people to inflammation of the lungs. 
Hall's Journal of Health, in alluding to this 
subject, says : 

The old and the young delight in warmth ; 
it is to them the greatest luxury. Half the 
diseases of humanity would be swept from 
existence if the human body were kept 
comfortably warm all the time. The dis- 
comfort of cold feet, or of a chilly room, 
mauy have experienced to their sorrow; 
they make the mind peevish and fretful, 
while they expose the body to colds and in- 
flammations which often destroy it in less 
than a week. 



Children's Arms and Legs. — A distin- 
guished physician, who died some years 
since in Paris, declared : "I believe that 
during the twenty years that I have prac- 
ticed my profession in this city, twenty 
thousand children have been carried to the 
cemeteries, a sacrifice to theabsurd custom 
of exposing their arms naked." On this 
the editor of the Philadelphia Medical and 
Surgical Reporter remarks : 

" Put the bulb of a thermometer in a 
baby's mouth, the mercury rises to ninety 
degrees. Now carry the same to its little 
hand; if the arm be bare and the evening 
cool, the mercury will sink to fifty degrees. 
Of course all the blood lhat flows through 
these arms must fail from ten to forty de- 
grees below the temperature of the heart 
Need I say when these currents of blood 
flow back into the chest the child's vitality 
must be more or less compromised ? And 
need I add that we ought not to be sur- 
prised at its frequent recurrent affections of 
the tongue, throat or stomach ? I have 
seen more than one child with habitual 
cough and hoarseness, choking with mu- 
cus, entirely and permanently relieved by 
simply keeping the hands and arms warm. 
Every observing and progressive physician 
has daily opportunities of witnessing the 
same cure. " 



Poisoning by Adulterated Tin Foil. 
The tin foil in which so many articles in 
common use are wrapped, is made by in- 
closing an ingot of lead between two of 
tin, and rolling them together into foil. 
The outer layers often become broken ; 
and then the full effect of the poisonous 
lead is exercised upon such articles as will 
act upon it. Tobacco, cheese, smoked 
meat, dried fruits and pickles, are such arti- 
cles, and are often brought in contact with 
it in the packing. The Journal of Applied 
CJiemistry says that the nervous twitching 
of the muscles of the face, which is no- 
ticeable in some tobaceo-ehewers, is un- 
doubtedly due to paralysis caused by lead 
poisoning. The butyric acid resulting from 
the butter contained in cheese, makes a 
poisonous salt with lead ; and the acid of 
fruits, as it is perhaps unnecessary to say, 
will do the same. A reform in this matter 
of packing in tin foil is to be desired. 



July 10, 18C9.] 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



19 



Mechanical ^Progress. 



The Wood Screw Manufacture. 

A single Birmingham firm produces 
rather more than a thousand million wood 
screws yearly —or, say, 150,000 gross 
weekly. This firm, as ulso M. Japy, who 
has large screw-making works in France, 
" use," — says Engineering, — " the remarka- 
bly ingenious machinery invented by T. J. 
Sloan, of Now York." The works of the 
Birmingham firm employ a thousand 
people. To convey an idea of the extent of 
the business, and at the same time give an 
interesting mechanical item, we quote 
the following from the journal above 
named : 

"The outtingof the slot in tho head of 
the screw is effected by circular saws, of 
which Messrs. Nettlefold and Chamberlain 
use and wear out 150 gross, or upwards of 
20,000 Baws weekly, each saw cutting the 
slots in about 1,000 screws. These saws, 
of from 00 to 100 teeth, and of but 3 in. in 
diameter, cost M. Japy, the French manu- 
facturer, about 7d. each. Mr. Batho, who 
was for some years the engineering brain 
of Nettlefold's screw factory, contrived a 
plan of making thesesaws at a cost of about 
y,C[. each. He placed 114 (a gross) of thin 
circular plates, 3 in. in diameter, upon a 
mandril, and subjected them, as if they 
were a single piece of metal, to the action 
of a series of slotting tools. For saws of 
100 teeth he at first employed 10 cutters, 
thus finishing the saws, 144 at a time, by 
10 complete cuts. He afterwards employed 
cutting tools adapted to form three teeth, 
each at a single cut, so that, for 90-tooth 
saws, but three changes of feed were nec- 
essary, 30 teeth being cut, by ten tools, at 
each adjustment. The line of cut, instead 
of being parallel with the axis of the man- 
dril to which the saws were fitted, required 
to be spiral or twisted, to give the proper 
cutting angle to eoeli tooth of the saws. 
This was effected by giving to the group of 
saws the slight necessary axial rotation 
during the cut, which would correspond to 
the requisite angle of the cutting edges of 
the saws. It is something to save 20,000 
sixpences, or 500/. a week, in the mere mat- 
ter of saws for cutting the slots in screw 
heads." 

Electro-magnetio Safety-Lamp. — One 
cause of the frequent coal mine explosions 
is the recklessness of the miners, who will 
often open their safety-lamps in order to 
light their pipes. Locks, the keys of which 
are kept by the foreman, have failed to 
meet the case; for they are often picked by 
the very men for whose safety they are con- 
trived. An English inventor has just pat- 
ented a lamp which is not open to this ob- 
jection. It is described and illustrated by 
the London Mining Journal. The bottom 
screws on; and when quite home to its 
place, a steel pin springs up and fastens it 
there. This pin is within the lamp, and 
cannot be seen or reached. It can be with- 
drawn only by a powerful magnet applied 
outside; one more powerful than any that 
can be carried in the pocket. An electro- 
magnet is used. This magnet with its bat- 
tery is fixed in the lamp cabin, is constantly 
ready for use, and is under the charge of 
the foreman. The oil lamps, of various 
kinds, can easily be altered to this. 

Boiler Joints. — W. M. Henderson says: 
Biveted joints exposed to a tensile strain, are 
directly, or nearly so, as their respective 
areas, or in other words the collective areas 
of the rivets should be equal to the col- 
lective areas of the plate, taken through 
the line of rivets. 

The proportional size of rivets, pitch of 
ditto, and lap of joint, will be as follows : 
Diameter of rivets for plates up to three- 
eighths is twice the thickness of plate. The 
pitch for three-sixteenth and one-quarter 
inch plates is six times the thickness of 
plate; for five-sixteenth and three-eighth 
inch plates it is five times. The lap for 
three-sixteenth, one-fourth, and five-six- 
teenth inch plates should be six times 
the thickness of plate, and for three- 
eighth plates five and a half times. For 
double riveting, add two-thirds of the 
depth of the single lap. Diameter of half- 
round heads one-fifteenth for one-eighth 
of diameter of rivet. Diameter of conic 
heads twice the diameter of rivet, and the 
hight of both description of heads, three- 
fourth diameter of rivet. 



Galvanic Deposition of Nickel.— It 
was for a long'time practically impossible 
to deposit nickel iu more than a mere film. 
This thin deposit would then become oxi- 
dized, and worthless. Dr. Adams of Bos- 
ton has succeeded in obtaining deposits an 
eighth of an inch in thickness. He does 
this by modifying the character of the so- 
lution Tho Artisan gives a brief discus- 
sion which took place at a meeting of the 
Polytechnic Association of the American 
Institute upon the different conditions un- 
der which the eleotro-deposition of differ- 
ent metals takes place. It was remarked 
that the experimentation which had been 
gone through with upon nickel, would 
probably be of value in similar researches 
with regard to such metals as iridium, etc. 
A nickel electrotype plate would be prac- 
tically incorrodible, and much harder than 
copper, and consequently far superior to 
it. 

Smooth Pdlleys and Smooth Belts. — 
Mr. James Christie sends the result of his 
experience to the Journal of the Franklin 
Institute, from which we quote : 

"In order to obtain the full value of a 
belt, it is first necessary that it should be 
in thorough contact with the pulleys. A 
new belt will be found touching in spots, 
and will not pull well; any unguent on the 
belt will be found of immediate benefit, as 
it softens its surface, and brings it in com- 
plete contact with the face of pulley. 
The hair side, on account of its smooth- 
ness and closeness of texture, seems to con- 
form to this condition sooner than the flesh 
side, which is open in texture and rough 
on the surface. But after the belt is once 
worn to the proper condition, I doubt if 
there is any appreciable difference in the 
two sides, in value. In fact, with well-worn 
belts, which have been used alternately 
with each side to pnlley, it is often difficult 
to distinguish the hair side from the flesh 
side. By well worn I do not mean injured 
by use, but simply that condition of belt in 
which the color of the sides is rendered 
uniform by absorption of oil, and in which 
the surface gloss and texture is made nearly 
uniform by contact with pulleys. Intimate 
contact between belts and pulleys is un- 
doubtedly necessary. The utility of smooth 
faces to pulleys is also well established." 

Cornish Pumping Engines. — H. P. 
Birkinbine, engineer, writes thus of these 
engines : "The exhaustive works of Wick- 
stead & Pole fully describe the construc- 
tion and operation of these engines, and 
demonstrate theoretically, and by the actual 
working of engines in operation, that there 
is no other form which gives as high duty; 
that is, raises as much water with a given 
amount of coal. An experience of nearly 
seven years as chief engineer of the Phila- 
delphia Water Works, and an extensive 
connection with other water works, has 
satisfied the writer that where any consid- 
erable amount of water is to be raised the 
Cornish engine is not only the most eco- 
nomical in all items of running expenses, 
but also the most reliable, and that no 
other form of engine should be recom- 
mended. " 



Sc/'c/itijic jProyress. 



New Steam Ice Machine. — Dr. Van 
der Weyde, of New York, has recently, — 
says the Artisan, — patented a freezing ma- 
chine in which, by the consumption of one 
ton of coal to operate a small steam en- 
gine, a degree of cooling may be produced 
equal to that obtainable from fourteen tons 
of ice. The liquid by which its evapora- 
tion produces the cold, is a very volatile 
gasoline, and is obtained from petroleum. 
It costs about twenty cents a gallon, and 
may be used over and over again. The cost 
of producing ice by this means will be $2 
per ton; or, one-tenth of one cent per 
pound. 

Black Walnut Polish. — We find the 
following in the Chemical News: Pour over 
pulverized asphaltum twice its bulk of tur- 
pentine, put it in a warm place, and shake 
it from time to time. When dissolved, 
strain it, aDd apply it to the wood with a 
cloth or stiff brush. If it should make too 
dark a stain, thin it with turpentine or 
benzole. This will dry in a few hours. 

Spherical Safety-valve. — In a directly 
loaded safety-valve introduced by Mr. 
Nasymth, the valve is a sphere, and has a 
load hung to it inside the boiler. Mr. Fair- 
bairn loads tha safety-valve by a weight 
and lever iiside the boiler. 



Deep Sea Sounding— The Bathometer. 

It has been pronounced impossible to 
sound tho greatest depths of the ocean with 
a load and line. Sounding is uncertain 
even in moderate depths, owing to under- 
currents, and to the drifting of the oper- 
ator's boat. But an ingenious arrangement 
has recently been patented by Sidney E. 
Morse, the geographer, and former editor 
of the New York Observer, associated with 
his son Livingston Morse, — by which all 
difficulties are obviated, and the deepest 
soundings obtained with the greatest accu- 
racy. It is called the " bathometer," or 
" depth-moasuror." It was exhibited at a 
recent meeting of tho Association for the 
Advancement of Science and Art, in New 
York. It consists of a hollow cylinder of 
wood or tin, six inches in diameter, and of 
any desired length, containing a number of 
hollow glass spheres filled with air, which, 
by their buoyancy are to bring the appa- 
ratus back to the surface Rafter its descent 
to the bottom. The cylinder is so ballasted 
that it will take an upright position in the 
water. A weight is attached, which re- 
leases itself at the touch upon the bottom, 
allowing the cylinder to rise. This it does 
with the same rapidity with which it sinks; 
and as that has been determined by pre- 
vious experiment, the time which passes 
during its disappearance,;after being thrown 
overboard, serves to indicate the depth to 
which it has descended. Moreover, there 
is attached to the cylinder a glass vial con- 
taining distilled water, and having its neck 
inverted into a rubber bag filled with mer- 
cury ; a connection between the bag and 
vial being secured by means of a ther- 
mometer tube passing through the india- 
rubber stopper of the vial. The pressure 
upon the bag at different depths, causes a 
greater or less quantity of the mercury to 
make its way through the tube into the 
vial, compressing the distilled water to a 
proportionate extent. This quantity of 
mercury is another index of the depth 
reached ; and it is measured by inverting 
the vial, and thereby causing the mercury 
to flow into a graduated tube which is at- 
tached to it near the neck. A third mode 
of measurement, which may be employed 
as corroborative of these two, is the attach- 
ment to the machine of some one of the 
different self-registering instruments which 
are in use to indicate the distance passed 
through. 

The Tribune says of this apparatus: "The 
advantages claimed for this instrument in 
addition to its much greater reliability, are 
great economy of time and convenience of 
using. By the old method, from six to 
seven hours were required to obtain a 
sounding of 2,000 fathoms, while the 
Messrs. Morse estimate, from experiments 
which they have made, that their instru- 
ment will sink to that depth and return to 
the surface within thirty minutes. Nor is 
it even necessary for the operator to wait 
at all for the reappearance of the instru- 
ment, as the indications once made remain 
undisturbed; and in case of stormy weather 
the machine might be left to float about 
until a more convenient season, or to be 
picked up by some other vessel." 

The Scientific American says: "In a re- 
cent experiment the instrument rose from 
the bottom at the rate of twenty feet a sec- 
ond, or of a mile in less than four minutes 
and a half. They believe that a sounding 
in 2,000 fathoms water will ultimately be 
made easily in less than fifteen minutes. 
The time occupied in a sounding of this 
depth by those employed by the United 
States Government in sounding between 
Ireland and Newfoundland, preparatory to 
laying the Atlantic cable, was ordinarily 
six or seven hours." 



Museum Pest. — It is said that crystals of 
carbolic acid, placed here and there in cab- 
inets, will, by their evaporation, kill all 
insects that might destroy entomological 
specimens or others belonging to natural 
history collections. 



The Zirconia Light. 

Our readers will remember the announce- 
ment which was made some three or four 
months since, to the effect that zirconia 
would undoubtedly tako tho place of lime, 
in the production of light under the oxy- 
hydrogen flame. It was then asserted that 
it not only did not crumble and waste, 
like lime, either when in or out of use, but 
that it gave more light under given circum- 
stances. But for some reason the French 
inventors failed to bring their lamps before 
the English public. The Paris correspond- 
ent of a London journal, recently sent the 
editor one of them, with a suggestion that 
he test its power. The light was much less 
brilliant than that with lime, under the 
same conditions, as to the size of the frag- 
ment used, and its distance from the jet. 
Nor did any of the many variations made in 
these conditions by the experimenters, alter 
the result. The Engineer of June 4th, after 
describing the experiments, says: 

These conclusions do not in any way af- 
fect tho question of the permanency of zir- 
conia under the fierce heat of the oxyby- 
drogen flame; but such permanency, if 
purchased at tho expense of inferior light, 
iB too dearly bought, and will condemn the 
invention. Unless the inventors are ac- 
quainted with some peculiarities of zirconia 
unknown to those who are versed in the 
use of the lime light, and can by an un- 
known method bring out a light from the 
zirconia equal to that given by lime, the 
zirconia light, from an economical point of 
view, is a failure. 

Reduction of Silver. — Dr. Grager sug- 
gests, — says Prof. Joy, — a modification of 
the old method of reducing chloride of sil- 
ver by metallic zinc, that ought to be more 
generally known. The chloride is dissolved 
in ammonia, and poured into a well stopped 
bottle, into which metallic zinc in frag- 
ments is introduced. The bottle is well 
shaken at intervals. Three hours will suf- 
fice to reduce one-quarter pound of chlo- 
ride. The solution is occasionally tested 
with hydrochloric acid, and when no 
cloudiness results, the reduction is com- 
pleted. The silver is then washed with 
water as long as any odor of ammonia ib 
perceptible. The zinc fragments are re- 
moved by pouring the contents of the bot- 
tle through a funnel, the opening of which 
is too narrow for the passage of the frag- 
ments. 



The Aurora. — We extract the following 
from a recent article by Professor Loomis: 
Auroral exhibitions take place in the upper 
regions of the atmosphere, since they par- 
take of the earth's rotation. Whenever an 
auroral corona is formed, it maintains sen- 
sibly the same position in the heavens dur- 
ing the whole period of its continuance, 
although tho stars meanwhile revolve at 
the rate of 15 degrees per hour. At the 
hight of a little over four miles, the density 
of the air is only one-half what it is at the 
earth's surface. The phenomena of shoot- 
ing stars indicate an atmosphere at the hight 
of 200 or 300 miles, while the aurora indi- 
cates that the atmosphere does not entirely 
cease at the hight of 500 miles. Auroral 
exhibitions take place, therefore, in an at- 
mosphere of extreme rarity; so rare indeed 
that if, in experiments with an air pump, 
we could exhaust the air as completely, we 
should say that we had obtained a perfect 
vacuum. 

The auroral beams are simply spaces 
which are illumined by the flow of electric- 
ity through the upper regions of the atmos- 
phere. During the auroras of 1859 these 
beams were nearly 500 miles in length, and 
their lower extremities were elevated about 
45 miles above the earth's surface. Their 
tops inclined toward the South, about 17 
degrees in the neighborhood of New York, 
this being the position which the dipping 
needle there assumes. 

Proposed Change of Equivalent. — M. 
Babaohe says that if chemists would adopt 
four as the equivalent of hydrogen instead 
of one, it would cause the fractions of 
equivalents 0.5, 0.25 — which occur rather 
frequently, — to disappear ; moreover, it 
would enable us to consider this new equiv- 
alent as representing four atoms placed at 
the summit of a regular tetrahedron. 



20 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 10, 18 69. 



fminjj and g§ar%ra|j. 



Indigenous Cereals and Grasses of 
California. 

Much has been said of the wonderful 
display of indigenons florals in California, 
indeed this State has been called the 
paradise of botanists. But California is 
still more remarkable for its native cereals, 
and other valuable grasses. If the entire 
catalogue of native cereals were to be 
swept from the face of the earth, Califor- 
nia alone would be able, in a few years, to 
produce from her native grasses every va- 
riety of wheat, barley, oats, rice, millet, 
etc., which now constitutes such a large 
proportion of the food of the human fam- 
ily, and of laboring animals. 

The wild oats which cover thousands of 
miles of our territory are admitted by bot- 
anists to be pure, unadulturated natives of 
the soil, and not the result of the deteriora- 
tion of the cultivated grain of early set- 
tlers. The early Spanish explorers, more 
than 300 years ago, found native wheat 
growing along various portions of the sea 
coast. Prospecting miners have frequently, 
of late years, reported indigenous wheat 
along the central places of the western slope 
of the Sierra Nevada; and native rye and 
barley are also frequently met with in the 
same localities. We have seen it stated 
that the rye has been cultivated, and sam- 
ples of same taken to the East This grain 
the editor of the Prairie Farmer, to whom 
it was shown, pronounced " a very excellent 
variety of white rye, with a long, plump 
berry, of a beautifully clear color, making, 
it is said, a very superior flavor." Indige- 
nous rice and millet are found plentifully 
in the Tulare swamps, and in other locali- 
ties. Beans, pumpkins, cotton and maize 
were cultivated by the Indians of the south- 
ern portion of the State, when the early 
missionaries and other adventurers visited 
that region as long ago as 1541. 

Native varieties of flax, hemp and to- 
bacco, as well as a very superior species of 
wild sugar-cane, have been known to the 
Indians in this State from time immemorial. 
Such facts as these were received with 
much incredulity afew yearsago; but now, 
we believe, they are nowhere disputed. 

Some two or three years since the Stock- 
ton Republican noticed, substantially as 
follows, the discovery in that vicinity, of 
what appeared to be something quite new 
in the line of cereals : The ear or cluster 
of grains, formed on the summit of the 
stalk, was about 3% inches in length and 
four in circumference; the grains, several 
hundred in number, were about the size of 
the seed of broom corn ; but iharder than 
wheat and nndistingnishable in taste from 
maize. The weight of a single head was 
equal to some fifteen or twenty well- formed 
heads of wheat, and evidently grew upon 
a stalk larger and stronger than wheat; but 
smaller and less fragile than corn. It 
would doubtless prove of interest to learn 
whether any attempts have been made to 
improve and develop this cereal by cultiva- 
tion. 

Native Brasses, 
Some fifteen years ago, in the early days 
of Grass Valley, Dr. Cleveland, of that 
place, furnished the Telegraph, with 
whioh paper the writer of this was then 
connected, the following information with 
regard to the indigenous grasses then 
found on a single ranch in that town : 

There are ten distinct varieties of grasses, 
all of which, save one, (blue grass, brought 
from Missouri in '5U,j were taken from the 
ranch of J. B. Underwood, Esq., two miles 
from Grass Valley. They all exhibit thrift 
and high perfection in their growth, while 
the majority of them, by their limited 
culm and vast blades are distinguished as 
among the most nutricient and desirable 
species known. 

We enumerate them in the order of their 
value : 1. Blu« Grass. 2. Bunch. 3. 
California Timothy. 4. Heavy Top. 5. 



California Blue. 6. Swamp. 7. Bat-tail. 
8. Tickle, similarto this well-known variety 
in the Western States. 9. Wire. 10. File. 
The Blue-grass, upon which are reared the 
noble cattle and fine steeds of Kentucky, 
succeeds most admirably on the farm of 
Mr. Underwood. Some eighteen months 
since he sowed a small quantity of seed 
about the numerous springs which burst 
from the foot of the mountain where his 
lands lie, and it is mingling miscellane- 
ously with the Creole graminfe, above 
which its blue tops are seen waving in tri- 
umphant luxuriousness, and true Ameri- 
can-like, bids fair to crowd out every in- 
digenous variety. 

With the grasses, the doctor exhibited 
to us, forty-three stalks of black-rye, grow- 
ing from one seed, all flourishing and of 
fine size, likewise, a species of clover, en- 
tirely new. This Mr. U. thinks, will prove 
a fine fertilizer; it attains to more than a 
foot in hight, its bloom is charming, the 
fattening herds revel in its luxuriousness. 
The botany of the mountains is mostly 
new and novel, and we trust that its su- 
preme beauty and meritorious character 
will ere long give it a place within the pale 
of science. 



Kose Culture for Profit. 

Koses are extensively cultivated about 
Adrianople, for the fragrant oil which they 
produce. The rosefields in the vicinity of 
that city extend over some 14,000 acres, 
and furnish a most important source of 
wealth. A traveler who recently visited 
this locality, writes that the season for 
"picking " is from the latter part of April 
to the early part of June; and that during 
that time the plains are one vast garden 
full of life and sweetness. Hundreds of 
Bulgarian boys and girls are out gathering 
flowers, from early morn to eve; while the 
air is impregnated with fragrance and en- 
livened with songs, music and dancing. 

If the weather is cool, and copious falls 
of dew, with occasional showers, bless the 
gardeners, the crop is abundant, and large 
quantities of oil are secured. In favora- 
ble seasons, twenty-three pounds of leaves 
yield a miscal (1% drachms) of ottar of 
roses; in dry and hot seasons this yield is 
reduced sometimes one-half. The average 
aggregate yield of the district is about 
700,000 miscals of ottar, which will gener- 
ally bring, upon the spot, something over 
$500,000. An acre of ground, well culti- 
vated, will yield about 150 drachms, which 
is worth ©75. The cost of production and 
extraction is about §50, leaving ©25. The 
oil is extracted by the usual process of dis- 
tillation. It passes into foreign markets 
chiefly through Constantinople and Smyrna. 
Before going beyond these places, how- 
ever, it is almost universally adulterated 
with sandal-wood and other oils. So uni- 
versal is this practice, and so little is known 
abroad of the genuine ottar of roses, that 
the pure article can scarcely be sold. 

Fragrance Artificially Imparted to 
Flowers. 

We have shown in previous issues how 
flowers may be artificially colored. An- 
other singular discovery was reported in an 
Italian paper, some few years since, to the 
effect that a pleasant fragrance may also be 
artificially bestowed upon inodorous flow- 
ers; while the natural fragrance of others 
may be more or less modified or blended. 
The discovery was said to have been made 
by an Italian florist in Arieia, and the 
process as described substantially as fol- 
lows. We give it for whatever it may be 
worth: 

In order to attain this object, the roots 
of the plants are covered with fragrant 
manures. Thus, with a decoction of roses, 
the discoverer has been enabled to give to 
the Bhododendron the perfect fragrance of 
the rose. In order to insure a successful 
result, it is necessary to treat the seeds of 
the plant to which it is desired to give fra- 
grance. They are steeped two or three 
days in the required essence, then dried in 
the shade, and shortly afterward are sown. 
If it is desired to change the natural odor 
of the plant for one more agreeable or more 
desirable, the strength of the essence is 
doubled or tripled, and a change must be 
made in the nutrition of the plant. In 



order to make the artificial odor per- 
manent, the plant must be sprinkled 
and dampened with the essence several 
days in the spring for two or three years. 
And thus, also, it is said, a gardener 
may, at his pleasure, cause different plants 
or trees to share their odors with each 
other, by boring through the stalk, or 
trunk, or root, an opening into which to 
pour the fragrant ingredients. 

Fruit-Grower's Meeting. 

The fruit-growers of California met in 
this city on Wednesday last, for the pur- 
pose of devising some concerted action 
with reference to determining the feasibil- 
ity of sending fruit to the East via the Pa- 
cific Bailroad. After passing a series of 
resolutions to that end, the meeting finally 
resolved itself into a permanent organiza- 
tion, and elected the following list of offi- 
cers for the ensuing year: President, S. 
W. Shaw; Vice Presidents, B. N. Bugbee 
and D. W. Grant; Secretary, W. H. Ste- 
vens; Treasurer, Charles W. Weston. Di- 
rectors — H. Eobinson and E. D. Llewellen, 
representing Alameda; L. A. Gould, Santa 
Clara; J. M. Thompson, Napa; B. B. 
Blewer, Yolo and Solano; A. P. Smith and 
W. K. Strong, Sacramento; J. M. B. 
Weatherwax, El Dorado; John Briggs, 
Yuba and Sutter; Mr. Bose, Los Angeles; 
F. W. Haskell, P. L. Webb, A. Lusk and 
W. K. Cummings, San Francisco; Mr. 
West, San Joaquin. 

Annual meetings will be held on the first 
Thursday of May of each year - , when the 
election for officers will take place. 

The Convention adjourned to meet again 
on the 16th instant, when it is anticipated 
that some definite proposition from the 
railroad company will be presented with 
regard to the tariff to be adopted for the 
transportation of fruit. 

The matter is one eminently worthy of 
consideration ; and it is to be hoped that 
measures will be concerted which will 
make it advantageous to the railroad com- 
pany to use the powerful means at its dis- 
posal for developing on this coast a busi- 
ness which, with a suitable market, must 
soon grow into mammoth proportions, and 
prove of untold benefit to our people. 



Mammoth Bose Bushes. — There is a 
Cloth-of-Gold rosebush in the garden of 
Mrs. Col. Marshall, in the city of Savan- 
nah, Ga. , the stem of which is 24 inches in 
circumference, and a Marechal Neil of 16 
inches girth. 

There is a Cloth-of-Gold rosebush trained 
upon the walls of a factory building in Au- 
gusta, Ga. , whose stem is 72 inches in cir- 
cumference, and whose branches are trained 
over a surface 70 feet high by 120 feet 
broad. This is probably the largest rose- 
bush in the world. 

The largest rosebush in Europe is said to 
be in Toulon, France. It measures 32 
inches in circumference, and is trained over 
an area 75 feet long by 18 in hight. It is 
slid that this bush often produces as many 
as 50,000 roses in the months of May and 
June. 



The DnEKMrxTURE of Seeds. — Varieties 
of beets, cabbages, turnips, and all other 
kinds for seed, should be set as far apart as 
possible, to avoid intermixture, especially 
cabbages, no two varieties of which should 
be seeded within half a mile, certainly 
never nearer than eighty rods. Beans may 
be planted nearer together, with less dan- 
ger of mixture, than most other seeds. 
Any varieties may be grown close together, 
free from mixture, if they do not flower at 
the same time. Cucumbers, melons and 
squashes will not mix, as is supposed by 
many, neither will the watermelon mix 
with the muskmelon. The large, thick, 
white seeded squashes, with the fleshy 
stems, like the Boston marrow and hub- 
bard, will not mix with the flat, drab seeded 
ones, with angular stems, like the winter 
crookneck, summer squashes, or common 
yellow pumpkins, but these latter will mix 
together. Whatever mixture takes place 
in the seeds of cucumbers, melons and 
squashes, tomatoes, egg plants and pep- 
pers, will not appear in the fruit the first 
year. It is in the crop from the seeds of 
different varieties of these which have been 
grown near together that the mixture will 
show itielf the next year. — American Agri- 
culturist. 



How the French Fatten Poultry. 

A large circular building, admirably ven- 
tilated, and with the light partially ex- 
cluded, is fitted up with circular cages, in 
tiers rotating on a central axis, and capable 
of being elevated, depressed, or rotated, 
which are so arranged that each bird has as 
it were, a separate stall, containing a perch, 
The birds are placed with their tails con- 
verging to a common center, while the 
head of each may be brought in front by a 
simple rotary movement of the central axis. 
Each bird is fastened to its cell by leathern 
fetters, which prevent movement, except of 
the head and wings, without occasioning 
pain. When the feeding time comes, the 
bird is enveloped in a wooden case, from 
which the head and neck alone appear, and 
which is popularly known as its " paletot," 
by which means all unnecessary struggling 
is avoided. The attendant (a young girl) 
siezes the head in her left hand, and gently 
presses the beak, in order to open it; then 
with her right, she introduces into the gul- 
let a tin tube about the size of a finger. 
This tube is united to a flexible pipe, which 
communicates with the dish in which the 
food has been placed, and from which the 
desired quantity is instantaneously injected 
into the stomach. The feeding process is 
so short that 200 birds can be fed by one 
person in an hour. The food is a liquid 
paste, composed of Indian corn and barley 
saturated with milk. It is administered 
three times a day, in quantities varying ac- 
ording to the condition of each bird. This 
food seems to be very satisfactory, for if 
any chances to fall they devour it all as 
soon as they are released from their pale- 
tots. The poultry house is well ventilated; 
but, of course, it is almost impossible for 
any place where 600 fowls are confined to 
be entirely free from smell. It takes about 
a fortnight to fatten a bird by this method. 
Before being killed the birds are left in a 
dark but well ventilated chamber for 24 
hours without food. Each fowl is then 
taken up by its feet, wrapped up so as to 
prevent all struggling, and then bled so 
adroitly in the throat that its death seems 
instantaneous. The blood is then allowed 
to flow from it, and finally, after being 
plucked, washed, and cleaned, it is wrapped 
in a damp cloth and is ready for sale. From 
forty to fifty fowls are thus killed and sold 
daily. — ScientijK American. 

The Functions of Grass. 

It is because of of its exceedingly import- 
ant character in the economy of nature, 
that greeu grass is so universally spread 
over all countries, and in all climates where 
air-breathing animals exist. Its functions 
are extremely interesting, and very remark- 
able. Grass acts first on inorganic matter 
held in solution in water, which its roots 
suck up at their extremities and combine 
with essential elements extracted from the 
atmosphere. When thus combined, the 
grass becomes nourishing food for herbiv- 
orous animals. Without it, they could not 
live at all. All their digestive apparatus 
is constructed with reference to appropri- 
ating food thus originally prepared in grass 
for their growth and health. Carnivorous 
animals could not feed on vegetable food, 
but as soon as that has been animalized by 
being eaten, then they feed on the flesh of 
those that feed on grass. Lastly, man, be- 
ing omnivorous, has the necessary mechan- 
ical organs for digesting either vegetable 
or animal food, separately or combined. 
Grass, therefore, begins the process of fur- 
nishing food for the cattle on the thousand 
hills; men eat the beef; and so all flesh is 
actually grass, according to the Bible. De- 
stroy the grass, and the great magazine of 
universal food would fail, and all animal 
life would cease bv starvation. 



To Cover a Steep Bank with Geass. — 
The following method is recommended by 
a German horticultural association. For 
each square rod to be planted, take half a 
pound of lawn grass seed, and mix it inti- 
mately and thoroughly with about six cubic 
feet of good dry garden earth and loam. 
This is placed in a tub, and to it liquid 
manure, diluted with about two-thirds of 
water, is added, and well stirred iD, so as to 
bring the whole to the consistency of mor- 
tar. The slope is to be cleaned off and 
made perfectly smooth, and then well 
watered, after which the paste just men- 
tioned is to be supplied with a trowel, and 
made as even and thin as possible. Shonld 
it crack by exposure to the air, it is to be 
again watered and smoothed up, day by 
day, until the grass makes its appearance, 
which will be in eight to fourteen days, 
and the whole declivity will soon be cov- 
ered by a close carpet of green. 



July 10, 18C9.] 



Slock 3ievic?t*. 



Weekly Stock Circular. 

By Aisoeiited BrokmcftheS F. Stock mil Exchange Board 
Si.x Pjuvouoot July 10, 1869. 

City Stocks. 

The we*k tinder review ban been a dull one so far as stock 
dealing of ©very description were concerned, the Board 
havtitk* adjourned for a number of days to allow a general 
holiday during tho poriod in which our national anniversary 

occur* Salon of Spring Valley Water Co. stock woro 

madeal t*'>l Uf£M 28 The Pacific Insurance Co. have de- 
clared their usual quarterly dividend of 1 per cent, per 
month for the quarter ending June 30th. Tho annual 
meeting of stockholders will bo hold on Tuesday, the 13th 
Instant. The Uuion Insurance Co. has also declared its 
usual dividend, payable on and after the utli. Tho Occi- 
dental Insurance Co. announce their usual quarterly divi- 
dend of 1 per cent, por mouth for the three months cloniog 
with June; and the People's Insurance Co. their usual 
monthly dividend, both payablo on and after the IQth inst. 
The savings banks are beginning to announce their div- 
idends out of tho earnings of the past six months. The 
Odd Fellows' Savings Bank will disburse 13 per cent, pur 
annum, free of Federal tax, on and after the 15tb. The 
Savingu I'ni pay at tho rate of ll'J-Sth per cent, por an- 
num on term, and 9'- percent, on ordinary do posits, in both 
cases free of Federal tax, on the 15th inst. The German 
Savings and Loss Society same dividend as Savings Union. 
Tho Sacramento Savings Bank hud $l.i!03,lHl 56 on deposit 
On tht 3itth <>f Jun>>, distributed among 2,510 depositors. 
They pay a dividend of 1 per cent, per month for the hrst 
six months of tho current year. 

Tho Stockton Savings Bank credits its depositors with 
«:n;i.'ivi at the close of Juno, Stockholders receive a divi- 
dend of 12 per cent, per annum : six months depositors. 10 
per cent. ; three months depositors, 8 per cont. ; and tran- 
sient depositors, 4 percent. The Savings and Loan Society 
disburses a dividend of 12 por cent, per annum, freo of Fed- 
oral tax, out of tho earnings of the past six months. At 
the close sales of Pacific Insurance Co. stock were made at 
ClO&a/llO per share. 

Mlnlne Shnro M;irli4-t. 

Owing to the interruption of stock transactions during 
the period since our lant similar referonoo, by the recur- 
rence of our national holiday, the market has beon confined 
to a few days' business: however, during that time the 
sales havo been quite large and prices very fair, extending 
very generally over tho list of the Board and including a 
considerable amount of White Pine stocks. 

From our carefully compiled record of the sales in tho 
San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board, we givo tho fol- 
lowing interesting figures, for the first six months in 1866, 
1867, 1S68 and 1869: 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 

newhat transient— people coming and going— their lower levels in the vicinity. Tho Savage and 

e tho ores were evidently rich, and the surface Norcross may be classed as the most successful coi 

irently extensive, they could not satisfy them- on the Comstock during the past eix months. Th 

heir probable permanency. Then, there were the Hold Hill mine* nrnvort ■ morn aawtnnN nffntr in 



21 



MONTH. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


January' 

February. . . 


$•2,727,1*7 
8,7a2,292 
5,2991084 

4.<miHHi 

3,052,102 
2,406,341 


(3,664,822 
8,303,520 
4.034 .2 W 
5..W3.U1G 
7.651,865 
6,864,365 


$8.6118,934 
S,716,ft96 
11,471,830 
12.385,304 
10,162,396 
9,II7«.063 


97,964,734 
6.H1«.644 
6,954,1-15 
7,266,211 
6,HliI.913 
6,536,337 


Totals.... 


921,275,102 


$31,113,367 


961,513,123 


942,501,984 



Hale & N oneness— met with a considerable demand at 
prico3 ruling for some tl mo past. The oro extracted dur- 
ing the week ending July 3d. amounted to 1.321 tons, .'i 17 . 
coming from tho fourth station and 600 from the fifth Bta- 
tion. During the same time 902S tons were delivered to 
the reduction mills; on hand, 1,923^ tons. The fifth sta- 
tion will require retimhering, taking several weeks to do it; 
however, this will not interfere with hoisting from stations 
above. They intend to work sixteen hours and hoist from 
tho fifth level during the remainingoight hours, which will 
not materially lessen the product. On the fifth station 
they arc cross-cutting and developing the southern portion 
of the mine, which is reported to be looking well. The 
south winze which they are raising up from cross-cut No. 1 
is in excellent ore at the height of fifty feet above the fifth 
level. In the old mine the cages are now running to the 
00-foot station, and they are now ro-opening the single east 
drift on that level. During the present week $32,145 in bul- 
lion came to hand. A dividend of $6 per share is payable 
on and after the Iflth. 

CnoLLAit-PnTOsi— has been in good request. For tho 
week closing July 2d, 1.66" tons of ore were mined, 700 of 
the amount being extracted from the Blue Wing locality 
and QSO from the Now Tunnel. In the Blue Wing the faces 
of the scopes show more ore and of an improved quality. 
In other portions of the mine no material change is notice- 
able. They paid a dividend of $20 per shore on the 7th. The 
aggregate yield of bullion for the month of June is $175,700. 
Gould & Corky — has been quite active. The ore ex- 
tracted during the week ending July 5th, amounted to 
380'i tons. Tho bullion returns for June foot up $58,219. 
No important changes in the mine. Tho breukage of the 
crank shaft to pump gear lias temporarily interfered with 

work at the seventh station Imperial shows a yield of 

$26,386 in bullion, and Empire $15,277 during the month of 

June Sierra Nevada pays a dividend of $2 50 per share 

on and after the 10th. Capital stock has been increased 
from $1,500,000 to $3,000,000, divided into 15.0 JO shares of 
$200 each. Tho office has been removed to room 15, third 

floor, of the Express building Gold Hill Quartz shows 

a bullion product of $6,074, and Savage $89,500 during the 

month of June Ophir drift Is 413 feet in length. 

Amador (Gal.)— reports that in the new south shaft they 
have a bowlder ledge, on the west side of the "gouge," 
very similar to that in the north shaft slopes, and will pay 
from $6 to $8 per ton at a point fifty feet below the surface. 
This ledge is twenty-two inches in width, and together 
with the gouge (22 inches) and the main vein of sixteen 
inches, which pays from $18 to $20, they have a vein of five 
feet. Balance of the mine is looking as wejl as usual. A 
dividend of $8 per share is now payable — Eureka (Cal.) 
disburses a dividend of $5 per share from and after the 

10th North Stab (Cal.) levied an assessment of $20 per 

share. 

We are indebted to the "Commercial Herald" for the 
following interesting 



MIWIIVG REVIEW. 



THE WHITE PINE MINES. 

It being now nearly a year since the people of California 
began first to hear much about White Pine, and a little 
more than half that time since immigration and capital 
began to flow actively into that district, a brief review of 
its history might not, just now, be altogether inopportune. 

One year ago, then, there were not above three or four 
hundred inhabitants within the limits of the White Pine 
District, a large proportion of these being mere sojourners. 
The population, up to that time, and for a month or two 



after, was somewhat transient— people coming and goim 
because, while tho ores were evidently rich, and the surface 
deposits apparently extensive, they could not satisfy them- 
selves as to their probable permanency. Then, there were 
no mills or reduction works there, except the small eital»- 
lishmen*. of tho Monte Cristo Company, fourteen miles 
distant from the mines. No towns had been built — Trea- 
sure City and Hamilton consisting of a few rude cabins, 
not exceeding thirty or forty in number. No roads had 
been constructed, nor were there then more than two or 
threo lodes in tho district at all developed. The bullion 
product had, up to that time, reached only a few thousand 
dollars, being chiefly the proceeds of Eberhardt ore, the 
most of which had beon sent to Austin for reduction, As 
yet, not a sample of theso rich ores had reached San Fran- 
cisco, nor was anything known here of the wealth of White 
Pino, except what could b« gathered from the vague ru- 
mors that had then begun to spread abroad. Wo then 
know less of Wbito Pine than we do now of a dozen other 
districts around it. In June, 1868, thero wero, probably, 
not over two or three hundred company claim* recorded in 
this district— now there aro mora than four thousand : an 
increase not referred to as being a creditable achievement, 
or one likely to promote confidence in the dial riot, the 
greater proportion of these locations being worthless, and 
not a few wholly mythical. During the months of June 
and July population luoreased slowly, and not much pro- 
gress was made in improvements. In September more 
people came in, confidence in tho mines increased, and 
every branch of business was marked by greater activity 
and energy. Roads, already laid out, wore built, mills were 
brought in, and the owners of promising claims began to 
prospect the samo on a liberal scale. No large sales of 
mining properties had, however, as yet been effected, and 
the prices of town lots remained at low figures. By the 
middle of October one ten-stamp mill, erected by General 
Page, at Sherraantown. had been got in operation : and, by 
the tenth of the following month, another of like capacity, 
put up by Jeremiah Miller, was running at Hamilton. The 
starting of these mills gave a new impulse to business, and 
peoplo beginning to flock into the district, and real estate 
as well as mining claims soon began to appreciate. By the 
middle of November a good many capitalists had already 
visited or were then collected at White Pine; and before 
the end of the following month a number of leading mines 
had been disposed of. During this period the Stanfords 
had bought the California and the South Aurora mines; 
and tho Virginia, the Pocotillo, the North Aurora, Hidden 
Treasure, Feathorstone, and several other valuablo claims, 
had changed hands; tho purchase money amounting, in 
the aggregate, to considerably over a million of dollars. 

Toward the latter part of December the winter set in 
with great rigor, continuing, with but slightly interrupted 
severity, until the middle of May— seriously interrupting 
work in the mines, and preventing most kinds of out-door 
business being done to any advantage. During all this 
time— a poriod of four and a-half months— very little could 
bo accomplished, not only on account of the cold and 
stormy weather, bat chiefly because there was no lumber 
or other material for building, no fodder for stock, and but 
very limited supplies of most staple articles of food. 

Throughout the whole of this inclement period, while 
the cost of living was enormous, and when little or nothing 
could be done, multitudes, disregarding the warnings 
against such a course given on every hand, rushed to White 
Pine, there spending their money and means, so that many 
were obliged to leave before the season for prospecting, or 
even seeing tho mines to advantage, had arrived. Theso 
people, diaappointed and disgusted with their experience, 
left tho country, cursing its rigorous climate and denounc- 
ing the mines. In tho meantime, thousands of worthless 
claims bad been located, many of which the locators, 
taking advantage of the reputation of the really good 
claims in the district, managed to dispose of, generally tor 
small sums, parties excited by the rich ores exhibited being 
disposed, notwithstanding they had often lost by this Bort 
of venture, to risk a trifle where the chances seemed so 
good. And thus it happened that large numbers of porsonB 
became interested in a small way in these mines during the 
winter, when little was or could be known about them, to 
find, on the approach of spring, that they had nothing to 
represent the property purchased, except, perhaps, a thread 
of spar or a bunch of barren quartz. The deceptions prac- 
ticed in this manner have lead to a wide-Bpread distrust of 
the White Pine mines, and done much toward discouraging 
investments in that region. It is an indisputable fact, 
hewever. that those who purchased properties at all devel- 
oped, buying only on careful inspection, have in every in- 
stance done well, and could to-day realize two or three 
hundred per cent, on their investments, and in some coseB 
much more. In fact, never before have men investing in 
any mines had more cause to congratulate themselves on 
their ventures than those who purchased largely and intel- 
ligently at White Pine. 

Having shown how little had been accomplished in this 
district one year ago, we will briefly glance at the work 
since done, and tho progress that has been made, as afford- 
ing the best evidence of the enterprise and energy displayed 
by the inhabitants, and their confidence in the resources 
aod future of the country. 

There are, then, at the present time, ten quartz mills 
completed and running in the district. These mills carry 
an aggregate of 112 stamps, and, including sites, water 
franchises, etc., have cost a total of not less than $600,000. 
Three considerable towns have been built, many of the 
structures being of a capacious and substantial kind, At 
least 150 miles of toll roads have been constructed, at au 
expense of fully $150,000. Over 20 saw-mills and smelting 
workB have been put up. Immense quantities of wood have 
been cut, and many thousand feet of lumber manufactured. 
A vast amount of work has been done upon the mines, 
from which eight or ten thousand tons of ore have been 
extracted. A magnificent system of water works has been 
projected and brought nearly to completion ; besideB which, 
a great many minor enterprises and improvements have 
been planned, and many of them executed; nearly all of 
which.it shou'd be borne in mind, has been performed 
during the rigors of a long and dreary winter, with labor 
and all kinds of material at exorbitant prices. 

In and about the mines and mills there are now employed 
about 2,000 hands, whose wages average $5 per day. About 
3,000 tons of oro aro raised every week, of which not over a 
third is milled, for want of reduction facilities. The 
weekly product of bullion amounts to about $120,000, with 
the prospect of being increased at least one-half within the 
next six months. The ore now being crushed averages con- 
siderably over $100 to the ton, each stamp crushing about a 
ton and a quarter per day. There have now been extracted 
from the White Pine mineB very nearly $2,000,000, it being 
scarcely a year since the first crushings were made, aod not 
more than six months since no more than three mills, all 
of small capacity, havo been running on these ores. 



their lower levels in the vicinity. Tho Savage and Hal 
Norcross may be classed as the most successful companies 
on the Comstock during the past six months. The fire 
the Gold Hill mines proved a more serious affair in a pecu- 
niary point of view than was at first anticipated ; not that it 
damaged the mines so seriously, but from the fact that it 
was so long before it could be extinguished, causing a 
stoppage of mills, product of bullion, labor, and business 
generally. 

Tho product of ore from tho various mines has been 
quid' large, but the yield of metal per ton has been below- 
what may be considered the averago of last year. This, 
however, has been attended with a lessened expense, but 
not enough to mako tip the former aggregate profit per ton. 
The Carson and Virginia Railroad is boing pushed with 
vigor, and will bo completed within the coming quarter, an 
event that will cheapen transportation, and allow most of 
tho oro to be reduced by water-power, thereby enabling the 
working of ore which otherwise could not be made to pay 
for reduotion. Outside mines in Storey and Lyon counties 
havo contributed quite a largo percentage of tho ores lately 
reduced at tho mills in that part of Nevada. 

In California thero has been less activityand change than 
in the State of Nevada, but at the same time a steady ad- 
vance. The quart?, interest especially has been quite active 
of late. In several of our more northern counties surface 
diggings have paid handsomely, and in a number of places 
old diggings have been rewasbed with profit. In most 
places, however, the old surface diggings have fallen into 
tho hands of the Chinese, who are now f onnd in nearly 
every ravine and gulch in the gold-bearing region of the 
State, though it is impossible to form any correct idea of 
their gains, further than estimating their time at $1 per 
day, a Chinaman never leaving when he can make that sum 
daily. 

The mining ditohes that formerly yielded so largely no 
longer pay except in a few localities. The more extensive 
use of water for driving quartz mills will, however, gradu- 
ally cause this Bpecies of property to appreciate in value. 

The gathering of sulphurets carrying more or less of gold 
is gradually becoming a business of importance in surface 
mining. Formerly, whon large quantities of water were 
used for sluicing purposes, it was impossible to save these 
sulphurets. But with improved facilities and cheapened 
labor, this business can now bo made remunerative, the 
only drawback to a much moro marked success being the 
difficulty still experienced in extracting the metal after the 
snlphnrets are collected. 

Quartz mining has made satisfactory progress during the 
past half year, the only thingrequired to insure tho general 
success of this great industry being cheaper machinery and 
labor. With any material reduction in tho cost of the 
former, men of Binall means would be enabled to carry on 
operations on a limited scale, gradually extending them as 
their ability increased. 

A very considerable reduction in the cost of extracting 
tho ores is Likely to occur through the use of Giant Powder 
and the introduction of the single-hand drill, it being 
shown by actual trials carried on through several months 
that ore could be broken out with Giant Powder at a cost 
of less than one-half that attendant on Hb extraction by 
black powder. Tho principal objection urged by miners 
against the employment of this new explosive, that it is 
injurious to health, is considered untenable by many who 
have experimented with it on an extended scale. The late 
very general and long extended Btrike of the miners in 
Nevada county, without Bettlingthe questions at issue, viz: 
the introduction of the Giant Powder and the employment 
of the single-hand drill, has had a most mischievous effect 
in a voriety of ways. Through this cause the laborers 
themselves have been thrown out of work and deprived of 
their earnings, while the mine-owners have lost tho profits 
that they might otherwise have realized from the working 
of their ores. Tho product of bullion haB been reduced, 
and business of all kinds in the vicinity has been 
made to languish ; and, finally, the probability of Chinese 
labor being substituted for that of white men has been 
rendered imminent; a result tha*. however it might benefit 
the proprietors, could not fail to operate to the permanent 
injury of the white miner. 

A difference of one dollar on the cost of raising and 
working a ton of ore has now become the determining 
question whether many of our mines are to be worked or 
to remain idle— a point that the use of Giant Powder and 
the single-hand drill will in many cases be able to Bettle in 
favor of a continuance of operations; a circumstance that 
renders the determination of this matter one of great 
practial importance. 

It is the opinion of many that quartz mining is likely, in 
any event, to experience a decided expansion in California; 
the introduction of more effective methods of saving the 
metal, and the reduced cost of labor and machinery, coupled 
with a growing spirit of economy, tending to warrant this 
conclusion. 

The smelting fnrnaces in the Cerro Gordo District, Inyo 
county, have been doing a largely increasing and profitable 
business of late, the crude metal accumulating to such an 
extent that it has been found expedient to erect refining 
works, so that the precious metals may alone hereafter be 
shipped, the lead being retained to await increased facili- 
ties for transportation. New companies have lately com- 
menced the construction of additional furnaces in that 
locality, and it will not bo long until California will be 
producing silver in notable quantities. 

In Oregon, mining enterprise is being gradually extended, 
though not marked by any special activity. 

In Idaho, less jb being done in the department of quartz 
mining than formerly, owing, in part, to a large emigration 
from that Territory to the White Pine region, and in part 
to the recent disastrous failure of what was considered one 
of the representative mines of the country. 

From Arizona, more encouraging accounts reach us this 
year than have emanated from that country for several 
years past ; and as a number af compunies have fitted out 
in San Francisco with a view to making a more thorough 
exploration of that Territory than has evor yet been made, 
it may be reasonably anticipated that important discoveries 
will transpire in that quarter before the season is over. 

A new feature in the disposition of ores arises from the 
practice, now becoming prevalent in many parts of the 
State of Nevada, of sending large quantities of rich but 
rebellious silver ores by railroad to this city for reduction 
or a market; a method of disposing of this class of ores 
that will no doubt soon grow into general favor, in view of 
the satisfactory results that have attended those first 
trials. Thus far, more argentiferous ore has reached this 
city the present year than arrived during the last two 
preceding years. 



THE COMSTOCK LODE, ETC. 

In the Comstock mines no important changes have occur- 
red during tho period under review. In the Hale ft Nor- 
cross ground heavy bodies of good ore have been developed, 
imparting a stimulus to companies prospecting for ores in 



Jamestown, Cal., July Gth, 18G9. 
MJsssns. Dewey & Co.— Gentlemen:— The Patent for 
our Ore Washer and Concentrator was duly received by 
express. We return you our thanks for the promptness 
and successful manner which have attended your efforts 
in our behalf. Yours, Wm. G. Heslep. 



Weekly Shareholders' Directory, for 
Meetings, Assessments and 
Dividends. 

tComplled for every Issue, from advertisements In tho 

Miking Ann SciKirriric Press and other San 

Francisco Journals. j 

Comprising the Names of Companies, District or County 
ol Location; Amount and date of Assessment; Date of 
Meeting; Day of Delinquent Sale; and Amount and Time 
of Payment of Dividends. 

ASSESSMENTS. 
HAM v., LOCATION, AMOUNT, AMD r>AT BAT 

DATK OF ASSKSSMKKT. DKL1HQOXHT. OF BALK 

Alpha Cons. Storey co., Nov.. June 5. *5.....Tnlv 10— July 31 

BHie Rose, While Pine, Mav SI. 5c JulvlO-August 1 

Bull on Storev co„ tfev. Mav W, $10. .Payable Immediately 

Broil t, fthlte Pine, June 23, 25c July 29-Sept 4 

Central. Storey co , Nov.. Juno 23, 5X50.... J ulv 24— Aug 14 

l'o*ala, Mexico, June 19, SI. 25 July 24— Auc. 12 

Cutis. Chloride Flat, W. P., Mav 28, SI Jul v 7— J ulv 29 

Cherokee Flat, Butte co., Juno 28, *;- Aug, 3— Aug 18 

ChcMer, White Pine. June 29, 16c Aug. 4— Aug 25 

Cuba Conn White Pine. Juno 24, 6c July 24-Aug. 10 

Cayuga Chief, White Pfr.e, June Zl. 10c July SO-Aug. 10 

Daney, Lyon co., Nev., May 29, $1.50.... July 1— July 19 

Daniel Webster. While Pine, June 30. l5c..July 30— Aup. 19' 
Evening Star, White Pino, June 25, 10c... July 31— Aug. 21" 

Gold Hill Q.rStorcy co., .June 29 $1 Aug 2— Aug. 23 

Geo. Washington, White Pine, July 1, 10c.. Aug. 12-Auc. 26* 
Hiilden Treasure, White Pine. June 29,50c. Aug. 4— Aug. 25 

Hope Gravel, Nevada co .June 29, $1 Aug. 7— Aug. 28 

IXL, Alpine co.. May 10.81 50 June 26— July 14* 

Julia, Storey co., Nev. May 27, 50 June 29— July 17 

Kentuck, Storey co , Nov., June 14, $lu July 15— Aug. 3 

Lexington. White Pine. May 18.16c June 23- July 12 

Ma/cnpa, White Pine. June 3", 10c Aug. fi— Sept. 11 

Morning Star, Alpine Co., May 11 June 21— July 12 

Maxwell, Amador co , May 15, $1 June 16— July 15 

Mammoth, White Pine. May 20.25c June 26— July 16 

Miiueiita, White Pine. June 21. 10c July 29-Sept .4 

Mahogany. White Pine, June 17, 10c Jul v 23— Aug. 13 

Metropolitan, white Pine, May 26. $1.60 July 1— July 16 

Noonday, While Pine, June 14, Stic July 19— Aug. 9 

North Star, Nevada co., Juno 4, $20 July 9— July 30" 

North Star. While Pine. May l2,7Kc June 18-July 17 

' inehe. White Pine, April 6, 15c June 30— July 30 

Poc»lllo, Whilo Pine. May 17. $ I Juue24-July 16 

Kmhbun, While Pino, June 22, $1 July 27— Aue. 1* 

San Jacinto, Tin. Mav 27,50c June 28— July 13 

Sliver Moon, White Pine, Mav 31, 5c July 10-Aueusi 1 

Silver Wave, White Pine, June?, 20c July 8— July 28" 

Silver Vault, White Pine, July 1,6c Aug. 7— Aug. 28 

Thunderbolt, White Pine, July 1, 6c Aug. 12 -Aug. 26" 

Virginia. White Pine. June 17, $1.26 July 26-Aug. 11 

White Pine Water. June 23, $50 Inly 28-Aug. 16 

Wlllimantlc, White Pine, May 20. 2Uc July 19-Aug. 10* 

Yosemlte, Humboldt co., Nev., July 2, 50c. Aug. 7— Aug. 24* 
MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 

ChoHnr-Potosl, Storey co., Nov Annual Meeting July 12 

Chester, White Pine Annual Meeting July 30 

Evening Star No. I, White Pine Annual Meeting July 12 

Kcwancr Annual Meeting July 10* 

Norfh Virginia Annual Meeting July 19 

HI 1 1 pon, Alpine co Meeting July 15 

San Fernando Tunnel, White Pine. Annual Meeting Aug. 2" 

Savage, Storey co., Nev Annual Meeting July 15 

Setlgely. White Pine Annual Meeting Aug. 2* 

West California, White Pine Annual Meeting July 10 

White Cloud, White Pine Annual Meeting Aug. 2* 

Yellow Jacket* Storev co., Nev Annual Meeting July 19 

LAST DIVIDEND. 

Amador Co., div. $8 per share Payable July 3,1869 

Alpha Cons , Storeyco., Nev , div. $2 — Pay. June 19, J8fi8 

Bacon, Storey co., Nev., div Payable Juno 19,1868 

Coney, preferred Slock, div. 1>£ percent May 10, 1869 

Crown Point, dividend. $7.50 Payable Sept. 12, 1863 

ChollarPotosi, div., $20 Payable July 7, 1869 

Eureka, div. $5 Payable July 10, 1869 

Empire M. & M„ Nev.. dividend $6. ...Payable May 15, 1867 

Gould ft Curry, div.. $7.50 Payable May 16, 1867 

Gold HUlQiift M-dividend, $7 50... .Payable July 13. 1868 

Golden Chariot, Idaho, div. $3 Payable June 15,1869 

Golden Rule. Tuolumne co, div. 60c $ sh.. Pay. June 26, 18fi9 

Halo ft Norcross, div. $6 Payable July 10,1809 

Imperial, storey co., Nev., div Payable June 20, 1868 

Industry. White Pine, dlv.,$t Payable July 1,1869 

Keystone, Sierra co , div., $32 Payable May 6, 1869 

Kentuck, div. ,$20 per share Payable Jan. 10,1869 

North Star, dividend, $5 Payable Aug. 15, 1668 

Occidental, div. $2 Payable March 2, 1869 

Pacific Unassessable, div Payable June 18, 1868 

Sand Spring salt, dividend $1 Payable Jan. 6, 1869 

Santiago, Silver City, dividend, $2 50. . . Payable Dec. 19, 1868 
Savage, Virginia. Nov, dividend, $4. ..Payable May 11,1869 
Sand Springs Salt, Virginia, div., $1... .Payable May 5, 1869 
Sierra Nev., Storey co., Nev.. div. $2.50.. ..Pay. July 10, 1869 
Virginia ft G.H WaterCo. .Dividend, payable April 16, 1869 
Yellow Jacket, div., $5 Payable March 15, 1869 

Those marked ■» llh an asterisk (*) are advertised in this 
journal. _ _ ,^^^ mmmi ^^^^^^^ 

Latest Stock Prices Bid and Asked. 

8. F. STOCK AND EXCHANGE BOA Kb 

Fridav Evkmiwg, July 9. 1869. 
MISCELLANEOUS STOCKS. Bid. A*k«d. 

Unlfed States Bonds, 5 208, 18S5, '67, '68 $ — — 

United States Bonds, 5 20s, 1864 — — 

Unfed States Bonds. 5 20s, 1862 86 87& 

Legal Tender Notes. ..... 74* — 

Ciilil ornta State Bonds, 7fl, 1857 95 — 

San Francisco Bonds, 10s, 1851 par A int. 

Si\n Francisco City Bonds, 6s. 1855 — — 

San Fraucisco City and County Bonds. 6s, 1858. 

San Francisco School Bonds, 10s, I860 

San Franchco School Bonds, 10s, 1861 

San Francisco City and Co. Scli'l B'ds, 7s, 1866 

San Francisco Citv and Co. Bonds, 7s, 1862 

Snn Francisco City and Co. Bonds, /s, 1864 

San Francisco City and Co- Bonds, 7b, 1865-.. 
Sun Francisco City and Co. Juclg. Bds. 7s, 1863. 
San Francisco City and Co. Judg. Bds, 7s, 1864. 

Sacramento City Bonds..... 35 

Sacramento County Bonds, 6s 70 

Marysvllle Bonds, 10s 75 

Stockton City Bonds 65 

Yuba County Bonds, 8s «•> 

Santa Clara County Bonds, 7s 76 

Bulte County Bonds, 10s, 1860 75 

San Mateo County Bonds, 7s 76 

California Steam Navigation Co — 

Spring Valley Water Co 64js 

Alpha M 

Baltimore American — 

Belcher ** 

Bullion, G. H — 

Crown Point °* 

Cole(Va.) 

Confidence 

Consolidated Virginia . 

Chollar-Potosi '- «>» 

Daney .? 

Exchequer ...;....- " 

Empire Mill and Mining Co 60 

Gould ft Curry "2 

Child Hill Quartz 50 

Hale A Norcross »« 

Imperial «* 

Julia ..-• ■••■; i*S 

Justice and Independent « 

Kentuck • 171 

Lady Bryan « 

American %> 

Occidental if 

Ophir £ 

Overman 5n 

Segregated Belcher £"*a 

Savuge •■■ J? 

Sierra Nevada « 

Union 

United states — „ 

Yellow J^I^ELL^NEb^s'MiNiNG STOCKS. 

Amador (California! »5 

Aurora, White Pine — 

Eureka, (California) — 

Golden Chariot (Idaho) 4Z >* 

Silver Cord (Idaho) — 

Golden Bule. Calif ornia *0 

Mohawk (California) -5 

PocoiUlo, White Pine....: 2 



85 &7X 
100 — 
par ft Int. 



B8 



45 



04 * 



64 >£ 



3>i 
12 
70 



70 



173 



64 



Continental Life Insurance Co., 302 Mont- 
gomery street, corner of Pine. 



22 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 10, 1869. 



Mining Summary. 



The following information is gleaned mostly from 
journals published in the interior, in close proximity 
to the mines mentioned. 



California. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

Taeshtsh. — Mner, June 26th : Mr. 
Schwerin is having constructed under the 
superintendence of an old placer miner, a 
set of sluices for the purpose of concen- 
trating the soft Tarshish ore. 

M. C. M. Co. — An old and experienced 
amalgamator offers to erect roasting fur- 
naces for the Monitor C. M. Co's mill, 
which shall roast our ores and render them 
fit for amalgamation at on expense not to 
exceed $5 per ton; the M. C. Co. to accept 
and pay for the same when it is proved. 
The offer will he accepted, and the success 
of the plan will decide the long vexed 
question of profit from our low grade ores. 

Mobning Stab. — Chronicle, June 26th : 
Election of officers was held on the 17th. 
The present superintendent, Mr. Gamble, 
is retained. He has received orders to get 
out all the ore in sight in the upper levels, 
and -we hope to see the working force 
greatly increased as soon as the new officers 
get posted. 

Mountain. — There is a change of rock, 
and better headway is the result. 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

The Keystone mill, of 20 stamp capacity, 
crushes out an average of about §25,000 
per month. 

Muletown. — Mining at this ancient burg 
is being carried on pretty extensively, and 
pays well. Many more claims that are be- 
lieved to be good, would be worked but for 
the fact that they were located on the Seco 
grant, and miners are compelled to pay a 
tax before a permit will be granted them to 
prospect. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

Lowek Etch Gulch. — Chronicle, July 
3d: The 16-stamp battery on the Palomo is 
kept at work day and night, the rock yield- 
ing fair returns. The lead increases in 
width and richness as the shaft goes down. 
Alexander & Co's mill never stops, and it 
pours a constant stream of the precious 
metal into the pockets of the owners. 

Baileoad Flat. — The main shaft on the 
Petticoat mine has reached the depth of 
200 feet. Levels will now be run upon the 
lead and sufficient rock taken out to keep 
the mill in constant operation. Labor is 
being continued vigorously upon the vari- 
ous mines in the district with success. 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

Geobgetown. — Correspondence of Plac- 
erville Democrat, July 3d : The Eureka Co. 
have their 8-stamp mill and chlorine works 
completed, and will start up about the 6th. 
Wood & Co. have their machinery on the 
ground and are putting up a water mill. 
Other claims are working. Some very rich 
specimens have been on exhibition for some 
days, taken last week out of the Crane's 
Gulch claim. 
KERN COUNTY. 

McKneadney Mine. — Havilah Courier, 
June 29th: The miners made a clean up on 
Thursday. Eight hands, four weeks' run, 
worked about 70 tons, which yielded 
$2,950. The proceeds were appropriated 
to paying the back wages. 
LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

The Star of June 26th says: We were 
shown this week specimens of silver ore 
from a vein near the line of the San 
Ymidio Buncho. The ore looks very rich. 
The lode indicates a breadth of several 
feet 

Near Fort Tejon there is a gold mine be- 
ing prospected by Treadwell & Co. Should 
it maintain its present indications there 
will be a mill placed on the premises. 
NEVADA COUNTY. 

Empire Mine. — Grass Valley Union, July 
1st: We mentioned on Tuesday that the 
Empire bad started up, and that probably 
enough hands to fill the mine could be had 
within a day or two. Our hopes proved 
delusive. Yesterday a number of men were 
cautioned that if they persisted in working, 
misfortunes would befall them. So on 
Wednesday, only about half the men went 
down the shaft. The men are even afraid 
to tell the names of the parties who warned 
them. The labor of this place it seems is 
held under threats of violence, and we 
think it about time such things were 
stopped. 

Same of 2d : The Empire isrunning ahead 
with both shifts full of men. This is rather 
an unexpected state of affairs. 

At the Eureka yesterday, several car 

loads of splendid rock came to the surface. 

Hakteev. — 3d: A clean up of one week's 

run of the Hartery mino was brought to 



Delano's bank yesterday, and made 196 ozs. 
13 dwts. gold. 

The Union of the 3d has a long editorial 
on the Empire mine and the strike. There 
have been more threats. It places before 
the people of the town the serious ques- 
tion, " What shall be done ?" 

At the Cascades. — National, June 30th: 
The Eed Diamond Co. have completed 
their flume, 700 ft. long, and have com- 
menced hydraulicing. They use 300 inches 
of water and employ five men. The Ne- 
vada Consolidated Blue Gravel Co. are 
making preparations for a general clean 
up. They are working 14 white men and 
13 Chinamen. 

Wisconsin. — This mine has not been af- 
fected by the strike, but has pursued the 
even tenor of its way, yielding good rock 
and giving employment to 60 men. Last 
week the owners purchased the Burnett 
machinery, consisting of a fine engine, 12- 
inch cylinder and 24-inch stroke, good 
boiler, and hoisting and pumping gear. 
This machinery has never been used. 

Same of July 2d: In the Wisconsin, rock 
now taken from the fourth level, looks ex- 
ceedingly well. BenMcAuley, at the Sebas- 
topol mill, has just completed a crushing 
of 150 tons from the mine, from which $30 
to $40 per ton was realized, including sul- 
phurets. 

Clean Up. — Same of 3d: The Higgins 
ledge, known as Prank Morse's mine, con- 
tinues to pay well. A clean up was had 
yesterday after a run of less than two weeks, 
which panned out over $2,000, exclusive 
of sulphurets. 

Celestials. — Gazelle, July 1st: About 
60 Celestials left Nevada yesterday for North 
Bloomfield. They are to be employed in 
extending the ditch of the Gravel Co. to 
Big Canon Creek. The digging of this 
ditch is a great internal improvement. 
Without Chinamen, it would not have been 
attempted. 

Empire Again. — Same of 3d: Notwith- 
standing the threats made against the work- 
men in the Empire mine, and the number 
that left in consequence, the mine is still 
running with a full complement of men. 
A good many of the workmen are from 
other points in the county. 

Pekrin & Co. — 5th: We saw on Satur- 
day a gold brick, valued at $1,019. It was 
the result of 46 loads of rock crushed at 
Jos. Perrin's mill, on Wolf Creek. The 
crushing previous to this yielded $30 a 
ton. 

Mining Pbopebtypoe Sale. — The Union 
mine, with the hoisting and pumping ma- 
chinery, and the Forest quartz mill, are 
offered for sale. 

PLACER COUNTY. 

Letter to Butte Record of July 3d: At 
Damascus there are several companies just 
striking through to pay dirt, and every- 
thing is lively. The Mountain Gate claim 
has, through the labor of five or six men, 
yielded for the last four years more than 
the expenses of 30 men engaged in opening 
out a drift through aDother part of the 
claim. They have now finished the worst 
part of the job, having two tunnels of 
thirty-odd hundred feet run into the mount- 
ain side. 

SHASTA COUNTY. 

Eoabing ErvER. — Correspondence of the 
Courier, July 3d: The three ditches travers- 
ing this section are now in good repair and 
cover some of the best placer mines to be 
found in the State. The best diggings are 
now found in the banks and bars from five 
to fifteen feet deep, and can be worked to 
the best advantage by blasting powder and 
hydraulic pipes. Now the supply of water 
is more abundant than at any time during 
the past six years, and is sold to miners at 
eight cents an inch. There is any amount 
of unclaimed ground covered by the ditches 
which will pay. 
SIERRA COUNTY. 

Pbogbessing. — Downieville Messenger, 
July 3d: The work on the Hog Canon 
quartz mill and mine is said to be progress- 
ing rapidly. . .The Keystone Co. is puttin 
a new and larger pump in their shaft T 
understand that the last clean-up was 

best ever made at that mine Wate 

given out at the Woodchuck mine. 
TRINITY COUNTY. 

Canon Ceeek. — Corresponder 
Journal, July 3d: D. Evans in' 
tend the Depinette ditch do- 
about three miles, to Conr 
season. Should this ent' 
through, it will make 
Canon Creek, for the dit 
dreds of acres of good 
TUOLUMNE COU 

Eich Stbike. — F 
3d: J. AY. Ander 
Curtis Creek, a f 
of quartz, bear' 
week au assay 



of 96 ounces of gold and 24 ounces of sil- 
ver to the ton. The lode is on Curtis 
Creek, below Algerine. 

Anotheb Chtpsa. — A piece of pure gold 
weighing 22 ounces was found in the old 
Daly claim at Columbia on Wednesday last. 

Arizona. 

Black Canon. — Prescott Miner, June 
12th: The few miners at work in Black 
Canon Creek, are doing well. A miner re- 
cently wrote to some friends here to go 
down there, as they could make $6 a day; 
and many will go, as soon as the rains raise 
the water. 

Black and Bradshaw Mountains have 
never yet been prospected. There is no 
trouble about finding diggings in this coun- 
try; the trouble arises in the working of 
them. Large parties cannot agree among 
themselves, and small parties dare not stop 
long in one place, on account of the In- 
dians. When the time comes that two or 
three men can, with safety, start out alone, 
and work, then will come flush times. 

Items. — Work on the Sterling goes on as 
usual . . . .Gennny's arastras were running 
on Montgomery ore at latest accounts .... 
The Vulture is yielding plenty of ore. 

Both mills are at work The White 

Picacho is to be worked Gray & Co. 

will soon start their mill at Big Bug 

Geo. Lount has, he thinks, discovered the 
reason why the Paul & Wood process failed 
on Chase ore. . . .A. French intends to rent 
a mill on Lynx Creek, and work surface 
ore. 

Bashpoed Co. — This company will cut 
a ditch to carry water into the gulches back 
of the old Mexican camp, on Lower Lynx 
Creek. They will take the water from a 
creek that empties into Lynx, near the old 
French diggings. The Mexicans merely 
skimmed the bedrock in the gulches. 

Independence Mink — Same of 19th: On 
the 12th, the shaft was down 25 ft.; the 
lode 12 ft. thick, and the rock rich in free 
gold. About 100 tons of rock were on the 
surface, which Mr. Boggs says he intends 
working in arastras. He brought over 
three ounces of amalgam — worth $30 — 
which he got from 40 ths. of rock. 

Montgomery. — The news from this mine 
is cheering. Geo. Monroe says the wheel 
and arastras work well, and the rock was 
the richest he had seen in the Territory. 

Black Canon. — Mr. Branerman has in- 
formed us that the miners in Black Canon 
Creek, worked in the diggings as long as 
the water lasted, and made very good wages. 
He weighed, for one miner, 1% pounds of 
gold. 

Lower Lynx Ceeek. — Joseph Bevoirs 
and partners have averaged $7 a day each; 
in their claim. They are now waiting for 
water. 

Walkee's Disteict. — Ed. Bowers, Supt. 
of the Wells Hydraulic Co. , has completed 
one mile of ditch to carry 500 in. of water, 
and one-half mile which will carry 300 in. 
A large reservoir, in Eich Gulch, will soon 
be finished. 

Henry Herbert, an old Nevada County, 
Cal., miner, had found prospects below the 
canon — that warrant the belief that the bar 
will pay $7 or $8 per day to the hand. 
Uncle Billy Pointer was working on his 
lode, and taking out very rich rock. 

Colorado. 

Bullion.— Central City Herald, June 
16th: Warren Hussey & Co. had three re- 
torts on their counter last evening, one of 
105 ozs. from the Jones, one of 92 ozs. 
from the Bobtail, and a large one from the 
U. P. E., besides a number of smaller 
ones, in all about 600 ozs., all of which 
came in daring two or three days. 

New Lr -Eichard Snaire and another 
man hav * new lode, and called it 

the Kn "*■ is 200 yards north of 

theP "aft is 30 feet deep, 

and 3 to 5 inches, 

wc 

i on the 

-»unce 

•ft 



N 0> 



are of the opinion that the richest and 
strongest vein has been missed entirely in 
running the drift east from the main shaft. 
The mine, if properly worked, ought to 
give employment to a large number of 
miners. The Central Gold Mining Co. is 
one of the corporations whose operations 
have been disastrous to the stockholders 
and a curse to Gilpin county. 

Geobgetown Items. — Mr. Burleigh has 
returned from the East, and will push the 
Burleigh tunnel with vigor. . . .The Balti- 
more Co's tunnel above Brownsville is go- 
ing into the mountain two feet per day. . . . 
Stewart's works are in full blast, turning 
out from 1,800 to 2,000 ounces of silver 
per week, running on Equator ore for the 
last three weeks, and in a few days will 
again commence on ore from the Terrible 
mine. . . .Saw a 1,500-ounce brick from 
Clark & Co's bank, yesterday, from Stew- 
art's, out of Equator ore .... Kurtz's Con- 
centrating Works are approaching comple- 
tion. 

The Reyisier of the 22d says: Professor 
Hill's works are sending up the smoke of 

their burnings continually The Teats 

mine never looked better than to-day. A 
large force is at work taking out the best 
ore ever produced in Colorado. An assay 
made a few days ago by Von Shultz gave 
$29,000. 

Idaho. 

Big Clean Up. — Idaho City World, June 
24th: Doc. Noble, Saunders, Elkins, Noble 
& Alderson, on Buena Vista Bar, last Sat- 
urday, after a run of fourteen days, cleaned 
up nearly $5,000. 

Keystone Ledge Obe. — Bailey Simpson 
showed us some ore from the Keystone 
ledge, which had been roasted in a forge, 
and showed silver all through. 

New Quabtz Ledge. — We learn that a 
ledge was discovered Saturday, near Dem- 
ocrat Gulch, which prospects richly, and 
crops out an average width of over three 
feet, so far as traced, a length of two miles. 

Bullion. — Silver City Wave, July 2d: 
Wells, Fargo & Co. shipped during June, 
from their office in Silver City, $96,320 
coin, equal to $128,426 currency. We 
know of shipments by private hands 
amounting to several thousands, that will 
swell the coin value perhaps to $110,000. 

Moose Ceeek Mines. — A. C. Wellman 
writes the Walla Walla Statesman of June 
18th from Pierce City, that "there are 
only about 40 claims that pay anything at 
all, and even these cannot be worked but 
a short time longer on account of water. 
Ditches are being brought in, but it will 
take all summer to complete them. Be- 
fore the claims were opened the prospects 
were very flattering; one, two, three, and 
even $20 was got to the pan, but the leads, 
after working, have proven to be very nar- 
row and spotted. The basin is low, yet 
diggings are well up to the head of the 
gulches, making natural water scarce. The 
largest week's work yet made was 48 ozs. 
to two men, and the largest nugget $117." 

Waeeen's Diggings. — The Walla Walla 
Union says: Warren's diggings are badly 
off for paying placer claims, though they 
have some good paying ledges and two 
mills running. A discovery has recently 
been made in Jaw Bone Flat, near Lewis- 
ton, but requires a ditch at a cost of about 
$15,000 to be successfully worked. The 
probability is the ditch will be brought in. 

Nevada. 

COPE DISTRICT. 

The Enterprise of June 29th gives a no- 
tice of this new mining region, having ob- 
tained items from Col. Frank Denver, just 
returned. We condense: "The mines are 
favorably situated for working, and the 
leads of good width. The ores are sul- 
phuret, chloride and ruby silver. As yet 
but little work has been done. Col. Den- 
ver and party stripped the ledge for a dis- 
tance of 300 feet, and found it to be oh an 
average 5% feet in width. Three hundred 
pounds of ore from this lead worked at the 
Miners' Foundry, San Francisco, yielded 
$420 per ton. 

They have laid out a town called Mount- 

"'ity, on the banks of the Owyhee 

T n 'the town and the valley there 

300 persons. In the vicinity 

^ower sufficient to run 1,000 

f er of the district is 20 

'ine. 

way to Mountain 

•nines 20 miles 

,# u which is 

t found. 

"s to 



>■■■■■, <, 
'C. *<>. --o. 



July 10, 1869.] 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



23 



great source of revenue to its owners; but 
that outside of this, others have have not 
as yet lieen discovered. 

The. Elko Independent, June 30th, says 
the daily reports are encouraging. It gives 
also a letter from Bull Bun, a new district 
due north from Elko, with ledges said to 
be like those of White Pine. The same 
speaks of rich discoveries on the east side 
of the Buby range, and great excitement 
among the ranchers. 
HUMBOLDT. 

Battle Mountain. — Correspondence of 
the Enterprise, July 1st: "Beyond doubt, 
these are the richest and most extensive 
copper mines in the State, averaging 40 per 
cent, copper, and, in some instances, from 
36 to $20 in silver. A number of compa- 
nies have been organized in the Eastern 
States and England to develop them, some 
of whom are now delivering ore at the sta- 
tion for transportation by rail. 

There are silver-bearing veins in this 
district, which are considered very valua- 
ble, among which the Little Qiant is most 
prominent, paying a profit from the begin- 
ning, without capital. It is owned by A. 
P. K. Safford, Geo. W. Fox, Bobt. McBeth, 
and John Mellander. The company have 
a 5-stamp wet crushing steam mill, com- 
plete in every particular. Several tunnels 
have been run on the vein, the lower one 
exposing the ledge to the depth of 250 ft., 
showing more ore than the mill can work 
in one year. I rind that the average yield 
of this ore, np to this time, is 8186 per ton; 
the bullion showing no gold, and averag- 
ing .991 fine in silver, bringiug a premium 
of 2; j per cent. The average width of the 
ore is about 16 inches, and is all milled 
without sorting. 

WASHOE. 

[ In the Stock Circular, in another por- 
tion of this paper will be found late mining 
news from this district. ] 

Occidental Mine. — Enterprise, July 2d: 
Good progess is made in the lower tunnel. 
The rock is becoming softer. 

Siekka Nevada. — The Sierra Nevada are 
still taking out large amounts of rich ore, 
and their miil of 20 stamps is pounding 
away day and night. 

Flowery. — The mine is looking well, 
and fine ore is being extracted at both the 
shaft and tunnel. They keep their mill in 
constant operation. 

Julia. — The Julia Co. are going ahead 
with their shaft. 

Ophik. — Same of 4th: The Ophir Co. 
are making good progress with their shaft 
to the westward. 

Sacramento. — The mine is yielding a 
considerable amount of good milling ore. 
The summit mill is running on ore from 
the mine. 

Dividend. — The Chollar-Potosi yesterday 
declared a dividend of $20 per share, pay- 
able July 7th. 

Virginia City correspondence of the 
Herald, dated Julv 3d: The Yellow Jacket 



Othello Co. have decided to erect their 10- 
stamp mill, now on the road from Elko, at 
Swansea. . . . Telegram, June 26th: The Lo- 
gan mill in Swansea is fast approaching 
completion .... Mr. Mosheimer's smelting 
works at Swansea will be in complete run- 
ning order in from 10 to 12 days. The ca- 
pacity of the furnace will be 10 tons per 
day. They have now a large amount of 
ore npon their platform, and more arriving 
daily. A great deal of the ore is about TO 
per cent, lead, carrying from §40 to $50 of 
silver per ton. 

Outside Districts. — Test Piute. — Par- 
ties are negotiating for the Crescent mill. 
This mill was built two years ago by New 
Yorkers at a cost of $75,000, and has never 
run a single day. It is within 15 miles of 
the district. . . .One mine has been opened 
which shows chloride from one end of the 
face to the other.... Ely District is 140 
miles southeast of Hamilton. A letter to 
the Empire of June 29th says: " Our 
mines are well-defined, and pay from the 
top down. We have milling rock and 
smelting ore in abundance. In the 
Pioche ledge they have gone down over 40 
feet We have a furnace for smelting ores 
capable of working from three to four tons 
per day. The district possesses plenty of 
wood. We have good springs of water.'' 
••■•Telegram, June 28th: Assays of ore 
from the Oro Fino ledge, Sacramento dis- 
trict, gave $376 in gold ... In Bobinson 
district, Sam. Brannan is digging wells. 
The ores assay up to $200. Most of them 
will have to be smelted. 

Items of Mining Progress. — News, 
June 24th: Ince Hall's mine is turning out 
rrch ore .... Snow having disappeared from 
Metal Bange, miners must leave for the 
present, having no water. . . .The Whiteman 
and Loneman mine, has a shaft down 78 ft., 
which followed a fine hanging wall all the 
way. . . .Same of 28th: The Alturas and In- 
dustry mines were connected on Thursday 
by the former breaking through. Saturday 
the Posthole broke through into the Altu- 
ras, and the latter's title not being as old as 
that of the former, the Alturas surrendered 
its ground. The Posthole did the fair thing, 
gave up all the rock extracted by the Altu- 
ras Co., and purchased the tools used in that 
shaft. . . .Giant Powder is used on the John 
Dare. . . .Twenty tons of ore was sent yes- 
terday to mill from the Pocotillo, by pack 
mules. . . .The Addington struck it on Sat- 
urdry. . . .The Nevada (Treasure Hill Mill 
and Mining Co.,) Industry and Posthole 
mines have come to an amicable adjust 
ment of title .... 30th: Pennsylvania started 
up yesterday .... The Dorin has struck ore 
assaying from $236 to $722 per ton, at a 
depth of 38 ft. . . .July 1st: The Mammoth 
has purchased the Sheboygan .... Ore as- 
saying $1,900 has been taken from the Ex- 
celsior mine . . . Empire, June 27th: One 
hundred and twenty-five tons of ore from 
the Battler mine, crushed at Dunn & Mc- 
Cone's mill last week, yielded $19,040, or 
$152.32 per ton. 



an abundance of ore and the mills to work 
it. 

Oregon. 

Canon City. — Dalles Mountaineer cor- 
respondence, June 9th: The Prairie Dig- 
gings Co. has a good ledge, an excellent 
mill, and fine water-power, — and is making 
good dividends. 

Willow Creek Mines. — The Portland 
Oregonian of June 19th, says: The mines 
on Willow, Birch and Camp creeks pros- 
pect finely, but the want of water balks all 
profitable enterprises. During this season 
the great ditch will probably be completed, 
and it is expected that next spring will open 
with more favorable prospects. 

Wyoming. 

Items. — The Sweetwater 3fines, June 23d: 
Mason & Co. are prosecuting work with 
vigor on their quartz mill on Little Hermit 
Creek. . . .Pease & Co., of Atlantic City, are 
extracting ore from the Caraboo to be 
crushed in their arastra. .. .There was a 
rumor on the street yesterday that plaoer 
diggings had been discovered a few miles 
from here that would yield 40 cents to the 
pan.... James Mills is driving ahead the 
work on his quartz mill . . . .The Confidence 
ledge shows free gold in abundance. There 
is a shaft down eight feet, and a vein of 
quartz over five feet in width. .. .Ledges, 
and rich ones too, are daily being brought 
to light that have been tramped over thou- 
sands of times. The custom mills that are 
in course of construction will soon be ready 
to crush any amount. 

Items.— Same of 26th: Mr. Mill's mill is 
going rapidly forward. Kitter & Mason's 
mill, on Little Hermit Creek, is also pro- 
gressing. Mr. Anthony's mill at Atlantic 
City, is completed, and Bice & Co's mill 
will soon be crushing. . . .Hunt and Daniels 
on Cariso Gulch, cleaned up yesterday. 

Amount not known, but big Bock Creek 

claims are paying better than was expected. 
. . . .Thos. Collin's 20-stamp mill is on the 

road from Chicago We were shown 

quartz this morning from five ledges dis- 
covered on the 15th. The rock is sticking 
full of free gold, and we are told that as far 
down as they had sunk, gold was visible. 
These ledges are four miles from South 
Pass, and three from Atlantic City, up Bock 
Creek. 



Horace Greeley on Patents and Copy- 
Eights. 

"Sir Walter Scott barely escaped dy- 
ing a bankrupt, when one cent per vol- 
ume from his American readers would have 
saved him from pecuniary embarrassment, 
smoothed his downhill of life, and perhaps 
enabled him to live longer and write more 
and better. I wish we had rendered him 
naked justice. 

As to the abolition of the Patent system, 
which has of late been influentially advo- 
cated, I shall be more easily reconciled to it 
oe swiftly followed 
"its of property 
of all legal 
h rights, 
'•ill re- 
<ld, 



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Chemistry of the Stetefeldt Chloridizing 
Boasting Furnace. 

Written for the M nunc: aim Scientific Press. 
BY G. KTJSTJJL. 

The mechanical part of the roasting of 
silver ores in Stetefeldt's furnace is so 
simple that the whole manipulation is ex- 
plained in a few words. The principal 
point is the maintenance of a uniform fire 
in two fire-places, and a certain degree of 
pulverization. The oro must be carefully 
mixed with salt of equal fineness, which 
best accomplished by crushing the ore to 
gether with the salt. The hopper is con- 
tinually charged with the pulverized ore. 
The feeding is done by machinery, with 
great precision, by an improved arrange- 
ment. 

The chemical proceeding of the cblori- 
nation is very interesting. At the first 
glance it would seem that, considering the 
short time of two seconds in which the 
falling ore is exposed to the flame, a per- 
fect chlorination could not take place, 
especially if compared with the known 
facts apparent in the common roasting fur- 
nace — that is, that sulphurous acid is first 
formed under influence of a dark red heat, 
by aid of the oxygen of the air, while the 
metal, deprived of its sulphur, becomes an 
oxide. The oxygen of the air and of the 
oxide act oh the sulphurous acid, convert- 
ing it into sulphuric acid, which again 
combines with the metal oxido to a sul- 
phate. The sulphate reacts now on the 
salt, setting the chlorine free, and the 
formation of chlorides begins. 

This reaction and transformation requires 
time, which is not offered in Stetefeldt's 
furnace; but the chlorination is effected 
nevertheless, and very perfectly, with less 
salt, and in a few seconds. The chemical 
action in Stetefeldt's furnace is as follows: 
As soon as the ore enters the furnace, each 
sulphuret particle ignites, being surround- 
ed by a glowing atmosphere; evolving at 
the same time sulphur, which, in presence 
of atmospheric air entering undecomposed 
through the grates, is converted into sul- 
phurous acid, and the metal into an oxide. 
In'contact with ore particles and oxygen, 
the sulphurous acid becomes sulphuric 
acid. This acid does not combine with the 
metal oxide to a sulphate, as is the case in 
a common furnace, or if so, only to an in- 
significant degree, on account of the tem- 
perature, which, nearly from the start is 
too high. The sulphuric acid therefore 
turns its force directly against the glowing 
salt particles, setting free the chlorine. 
All these reactions are, so to say, in statu, 
naseenli. From the burning fuel some 
steam is present among the gases, giving 
rise to the formation of hydrochloric acid. 
The whole space of the furnace is then 
filled with glowing gases of chlorine, hy- 
•ochloric acid, sulphurio acid, sulphurous 
oxygen, steam, and volatile base 
Morides; all of them acting de- 
ind composing on the sulphu- 
rs with great energy. The 
■ses the sulphurets direct- 
of metal and chloride 
ises and combines 
hates. The hy- 
^e. The sul- 
salt and 
oxygen 
' and 



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24 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 10, 1869. 



Lining and scientific 19r.ess. 



W. B. EWER j...Sekiok Editob. 



A. T. DEWEY. W. B. EWEK. 

DEWET «fe CO., 3E»xxT>lislxei'S. 



Office, Wo. 41 -i Clay street* below Sansomc. 



Termo of Subscription: 

One copy, per annum, in advance $5 00 

One copy, six months, in advance 3 00 

ayFor sale by Carriers and Newsdealers."^! 



Our Agents. 

Otjr Fbxends can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and science, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their 
influence and encouraging favors. We intend to send 
none but "worthy men. 

Traveling Agents. 

Wm. H. MtTBBAT, California and Nevada. 

Dr. 1. <J. Yates, California. 

Isaac D. Street, Oregon. 

Resident Agents. 

Oakland — W. H. Hardy. 

Califoknia and Nevada — S. H. Herring. 

Sacramento— A. S. Hopkins, No. 70 J street. 

Treasure Citt, Nev.— J. L. Robertson. 

Shebmantown, Nev. — T. G. Anderson. 

Helena, Montana — E. W. Carpenter. 

Black Hawk, C. T. — Harper M. Orahood. 

Central Citt, C. T. — Richards & Crane. 

Georgetown," C. T. — John A. Lafferty, Postmaster. 

Denver Citt, C. T.— Woolworth & Moffat. 

Cheyenne, D. T. — Robert Beers. 

Omaha, N. T— Barkalow & Brothers. 

London — George Street, 30 Cornhill, E. C. 

A. C. Knox, City Soliciting and Collecting Agent. 



METALLURICAL. 



San Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, July 10, 1869. 



Notices to Correspondents. 

Crystal. — Professor W. K Sullivan found 
that crystallized gypsum heated with 
water in a sealed tube to a temperature 
of 150° Centigrade, lost part of its water, 
and formed the hydrate 2 (Ca O SO3 ) , 
+ HO; when heated for several hours at 
a temperature of 200° C, the gypsum be- 
came completely dehydrated. {Several of 
the zeolites, heated under similar circum 
stances, were also dehydrated, but re- 
quired a much higher temperature and a 
much longer exposure to heat than re- 
quired to dehydrate gypsum. 

Tide Mills, Humboldt. — By the estima- 
tion of Bessel, 25,000 cubic miles of 
water, flow every sis hours, from one 
part of the earth to another. The me- 
chanical force so exerted diminishes the 
amount in store by a like quantity at 
every tide which is converted into heat, 
and thus adds to the temperature of the 
globe. 

J. H. — The influence of the Gulf Stream 
on the climate of Ireland generally, but 
its S. W. coast particularly, is such that 
the arbutus flourishes as well there as in 
the north of Spain and Portugal; and 
Dr. Lloyd of Dublin reports as the re- 
sult of a series of day and night experi- 
ments, that the temperature of the sea 
off the west coast of Ireland is four de- 
grees higher than the mean temperature 
of the adjoining land. 

Peuruddock, Silver City. — The deepest 
mine in Cornwall in the year 1857, was 
the Fowey Censol's copper mine. At that 
time it was 328 fathoms (1,968 feet) deep 
from the surface, and 298 fathoms below 
the level of the sea. At the same period 
it was calculated that all the levels on the 
course of the lodes amounted to 153 
miles. Of the cross courses or levels N. 
and S. , twenty-two miles, and of the 
shafts, seven miles, or a total of under- 
ground workings aggregating 182 miles. 



Another Manufacturing Establish- 
ment Burned Down. — The Pacific Wood 
Preserving Co's works, northwest corner 
Pitch and King streets, — using tar to inject 
into the fiber of wood, and whose business 
operations were just beginning to be very 
extensive and promising, — have this week 
met the misfortune of the Pioneer Fuse 
Factory of last week— total destruction by 
fire caused by the unusually combustible 
material employed. Origin: the bursting 
of a retort, which let the tar into the fur- 
nace. Loss, §20,000, without insurance. 
Great castings for this company were no- 
ticed by us in connection with the Vulcan 
Foundry several weeks ago. Very little 
delay will be occasioned before the new 
apparatus will be set up iu working order. 
Sand reservoirs are to be provided, so that 
in case of a similar accident the fire can at 
once be smothered. 



Numerous elegant dwelling 
erected at Shermantown. 



are beine 



Milling. 
Amalgamation with the varied and excel- 
lent California foundry improvements and 
attachments thereto, is usually compre- 
hended under this misused word, which is 
properly to be regarded as the popular 
coinage responding to a demand for some 
handier word than "beneficiating," or 
" zugutemacken" — in which it seems the 
French, Spanish, and German languages 
are as badly off as the English. " Milling " 
would be an excellent word if beneficiating 
or amalgamating were purely mechanical, 
as is the case with free gold. Where chlo- 
rides are first formed, and iron or copper 
come into play under fixed laws of chem- 
ical equivalents, " milling " should not be 
a mere working by recipe as housewifely 
girls are wont to do in baking a pie; yet 
such is too generally the signification and 
the practice. 

"A. B.," a Central City, Colorado, cor- 
respondent, writes : 

" I notice in the Mining and Scientific 
Press various kinds of machinery for work- 
ing silver ores. If it is not asking too 
much, I should be pleased to receive from 
you your opinion as to the best mode of 
working what is termed refractory silver 
ores; the best crusher, the best pulverizer, 
what amalgamator is considered the best 
in your country; also roaster, etc." 

From every quarter the word comes that 
this subject is of an importance above all 
others, even to the existence of entire set- 
tlements; and invariably it is the cost and 
percentage to be obtained, that presents it- 
self to the science of the practical metal- 
lurgist. Good results, where the results 
are bullion, call for the keenest practical 
intelligence and enlightenment with all 
the aids of the books and of new experi- 
ments that are to be had. " Our greatest 
need," says the Portland Oregonian, *'in 
connection with our vast mineral resources, 
is that kind of knowledge that will enable 
us to work our mines with the largest 
profit; and for the want of this many mines 
are abandoned which in Europe or else- 
where would be worked with success." 

"What we want," says the Austin Bev- 
veille, ' ' is some cheaper way to work our 
ores. Until this desideratum is attained, 
no extensive mining need be expected in 
this portion of the State. Forty-five dol- 
lars a ton for crushing and amalgamating, 
with twenty per cent, deducted from the 
pulp assay, together with the bullion tax, 
brings the price of milling our ores to 
such a figure that an embargo is virtually 
laid on every ton of ore the pulp assay of 
which is less than §100 per ton." 

The cost of working ores and the per- 
centage of bringing-out vary so greatly in 
different regions and on different ores, de- 
pending always uponiheir mineral composition 
and gangue, that it will, of course, be im- 
possible to reply to "A. B.'s" inquiry in 
a general way. Weekly repetitions of data 
of cost, from everywhere, are to be found 
under " Mining Summary." This varies 
from $3 to ©50 per ton in amalgamation 
and wet extraction, the tools depending 
always upon what is sought to be done, or 
the process. If coarse pieces will do, as in 
smelting, the jaw-crusher is best ; if it 
must be finer, the rollers; if pulverulent, 
the stamp mill, or some of the grinding 
machines or pans. Varney's pans will 
take ore from a quarter-inch screen aDd de- 
liver it, fully prepared, to his amalgamat- 
ing paDS. Hepburn's new grinder and 
amalgamator will take ore from a three- 
eighths of an inch screen, and grind and 
amalgamate it in about the same time as 
the usual pans do from a No. 6 screen. 
Hunt's grinding cylinder will take ore 
from a quarter inch screen, and grind it to 
impalpable powder iu the time usually 
taken to do the same in pans, but much 
more regularly. 

To reduce from coarse to fine, a crusher, 
rollers and stamp mill (or grinder, depend- 
ing upon the hardness and brittleness of 



the ore and gangue,) may follow each 
other. To do all economically, nothing 
but the stamp mill has thus far answered. 
Howland's circular stamp mill is a well-de- 
vised modification, having the advantage of 
compactness for transportation and extreme 
simplicity, — described in the Press of 
March 6th, 1869. Where jigging is not 
practiced for concentration, rollers are of 
less importance. Probably no one thing 
could be mentioned that would do more 
towards making low-grade ores pay good 
dividends in this country than the intro- 
duction of improved sieve concentration 
processes, practiced in all older miniDg 
countries, on the principle of the Cornish 
" jigging." 

By the Hepburn pan, supplied with thir- 
teen sliding disks, it is claimed that $7 and 
§8-ores can be worked at a profit — at a cost 
of $3 per ton — the large amount of exposed 
rubbing surface being the characteristic 
feature, and having the quicksilver so ar- 
ranged underneath as not to be mechanic- 
ally floured by grinding. Two tons, we 
are told, can be worked at a charge with 
two-horse power. 

This appears to be the best of the grind- 
ing pans ; it is adapted for use after crush- 
ers that reduce to hickory-nut size, on ores 
that amalgamate easily raw, without pre- 
liminary chloridizing, and where scarcity 
of water renders dry crushing preferable. 
Dry amalgamation by the Paul & Woods 
process has run for a sufficient time now to 
be pretty satisfactorily tested; and Mr. S. 
A. Chapin of the Twin mill, Silver City, 
N. T., certifies that he obtains ninety per 
cent, where in the ordinary pan there 
could sbe obtained only sixty per cent. 
This is the simplest of all processes. Dry 
pulp (1,000 pounds), is intermingled with 
one-third its weight of quicksilver in an 
iron barrel 38x48 inches, for four hours, 
under moderate warmth — less than the va- 
porizing degree — at twenty-six revolutions 
per minute. So very minutely is the quick- 
silver found to be mixed with the pulp 
that it is not perceivable with the naked 
eye, yet by simple agitation in water it is 
settled and collected without difficulty, 
according to the statement. Theoretically, 
neither ore nor quicksilver is wasted. Itis 
alleged that sulphuret, antimonial iron, 
lead and copper ingredients, do not inter- 
fere, but stand by and see fair play; though 
it would seem that chemical decomposition 
and re-affiliation must include in the play 
some of the base metals, or there is some- 
thing very mysterious doDe inside of this 
iron barrel. After further trial, we shall 
probably learn that the process is most 
favorable to certain ores or combinations 
of ores and gangues in places where there 
is little or no water. 

Smelting. 
Whatever processes may be best suited 
to locality and circumstances where the 
ores are fahl-ore, grey copper, stetefeldtite, 
or the red and black antimonial silver min- 
erals, for which modified amalgamation is 
generally practiced, and is in most cases 
the cheapest ; for the sulphurets, carbon- 
ates and oxides of lead and copper, or ores 
containing more than fifteen per cent, of 
those minerals, there need be no hesitation 
about pronouncing in favor of smelting. 
There are wet copper extraction processes 
— like that tried by Eamdohr at Virginia 
City — adapted to low-grade ores for copper 
alone, which is brought into solution as 
sulphate, and precipitated by "iron 
sponge ;" but wet copper extraction on 
low-grade ores does not appear to be thriv- 
ing at present anywhere but on the Bhine. 
Many ores have beeu pronounced smelt- 
iug ores on this coast which can be suc- 
cessfully and more economically treated by 
other methods. Because ores are "refrac- 
tory " with quicksilver under unskillful 
hands, it is not necessary to conclude, 
therefore, that smelting will be necessary. 
Are there any smelting ores at White 
Pine? There have been formed six or 



eight smelting companies on that supposi- 
tion, answering the question in the affirma- 
tive. But without ores richer than the 
carbonate of lead found there, and without 
water to concentrate, the task, it would 
seem, should not be hastily undertaken. 
The base metal ores there generally contain 
more than fifty per cent, of lime or quartz, 
or other earthy material. The " smelting 
process " ought certainly not to be held 
responsible for failure in smelting raw 
ores of such a character — unless the verita- 
ble universal flux could be taken advantage 
of. A proper slag, — from singulo to bi- 
silicate, — is, of course, of the first import- 
ance; involving precisely the same princi- 
ples and method of procedure, chemically, 
as solubility in the wet way, and being 
based on a similar relationship of the alka- 
line to the acid ingredients —of lime to 
quartz in this instance, the chemistry by 
fluidity of fire being quite the same as by 
water. What makes smelting difficult is, 
that no recipe can be given for it: the 
smelter should be aware at every step of 
what he proposes to effect. 

The cost of smelting at best is not a 
trifle — is more likely to be above $75 to the 
ton than less; vide, our reports of Bel- 
shaw, Desmerenx, and Aaron's results at 
Lone Pine. Stetefeldt, at Eureka, Nev., 
could not do it for less than §80. Calcula- 
tions must not be based on small and favor- 
able samples. The following table, made 
by Frederick Brunckow, a practical engi- 
neer (subsequently killed by Mexican rob- 
bers) , shows that where labor was cheap, 
smelting still cost §89.92 per 3,000 pounds 
=§60 per ton. The comparative figures of 
patio and barrel amalgamation are suffi- 
ciently striking. It is a statement of the 
cost of reducing 3,000 pounds of silver 
ore by processes adapted to the several 
kinds, at the Beal del Monte Company's 
reduction establishments at Sanchez, Ve- 
lasco, San Miguel and Begla, Mexico, in 
1854; the average yield of the principal 
ores being §800. 



At Sanchez. Telaxro, or 
San Miguel, the Har 
rel Processus imc^,- a 
licgla the Patio amal 
gaiiiation and smelt 
ing. 


BF BARRKl AHALGAMA 
TION AT 


Bt/patin 
Amal 

Hon at 
Rtijta 


By 

Smell- 


Saneh a 


Vclasco 


San Mi if 


at 
Ecgla. 


Stamping, mcstlyfor 


s ei 

21 

78 

1 30 

2 15 
1 J! 


S 59 

25 

70 

1 20 

1 70 

1 04 


$ 60 
88 
08 


i 26 
28 
83 


$ 30 
28 


Wear of Stamp-heads 
Grinding in arastras, 

Drying and lifting, 
mostly labor 

Calcination, mostly 
labor ('uel below).. 

Amalga'n in barrels 
and patio, labor 

Smelting in furnaces 


157 

88 


3 98 


17 80 

04 
3 90 
3 40 
1 90 
34 90 


Distilling Amalgams. 

Casting silver bars. 

Repair or'uiachineo - , 


35 
OS 
33 
55 

3 79 
31 

6 70 


SI 
1C 
60 
30 

3 31 
3( 

637 


21 
07 
60 
40 

4 27 
27 

660 


05 

48 
40 

20 
3 6< 
2 13 




















Tallow and oil for 


3! 
2 15 

1 91 

2 14 
1 31 


37 
2 39 
4 23 


29 
153 


10 
4 32 








Steam power, mostly 




Animal power, most- 








SaHrics, assaying, A 
Ksp. of managem't 


1 14 


1 03 


1 09 


688 


ing3,U00lbsofore.. 


$20 47 
92.88 


$23 95 


$20 25 


$17 70 


$89 92 


Mean produce of sil 
ver lor 3,000 lbs ore. 


94.80 


62.40 


65.92 


518.40 


No. of careas (300 lbs) 
of ore reduced 1851. 


43.310 


53.895 


49.181 


37.982 


2.386 


Ozs of n.uicKS'v'r lost 
ncr $8 silver saved 


4.7!) 


4 97 


5.28 


12.7) 


















Kamte and Kindred Textile Substances 
will be under consideration this (Satur- 
day) evening, before the Polytechnic Soci- 
ety of the Mechanics' Institute, — a paper 
having been prepared with care and with 
the advantage of some experience, by Dr. 
Silver, — while members or visitors who have 
experience or information on the subject 
of textile fabrics, will probably add to the 
interest of the bearings of that important 
subject. 

"Las Minas " furnishes some notes of 
mines on Treasure Hill, which will appear 
next week. 



July 10, 1869.] 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



25 



Another Test of Barlow's Anchor. 

On Thursday last a number of nautical 
gentlemen and others connected with the 
press, were invited to witness, from the 
steam revenue cutter Wyauda, a trial of 
the new anchor lately invented by Mr. E. 
T. Barlow, of this city. The Collector of 
the port having kindly given permission 
for the use of that vessel for the purpose, 
she steamed out to a locality in the Bay 
just beyond the Dry Dock, where the an- 
chor was let go in tho soft mud, holding 
the steamer firm to her place, against a 
strong wind, acting in conjunction with tho 
tide. After holding awhile, the steamer 
was backed, at a rato of 50 revolutions of 
the screw a minute, under which tension, 
the anchor dragged in tho soft mud; but 
again held her fast as roon as the engine 
was stopped. Tho anchor was then taken 
up, and again let go at a point near the 
Potrcro shore, jnst beyond Long Bridge, 
where the same results were obtained. 

Some idea of the holding capacity of this 
anchor may be formed from the fact that 
it weighs only 595 pounds; while the small- 
est anchor, of the ordinary construction, 
employed on board of this cutter, weighs 
1,400 pounds — she being a ship of some 
300 tons, new measurement. This anchor 
is quite novel in its construction and ap- 
pearance, having no stock, while the 
shank consists of two parts, sliding upon 
each other, and held in place by two 
pivots, one at tho ring and the other at 
the crown. It is so arranged that both 
flukes take the ground, instead of one. It 
is by the application of this principle that 
the inventor is able to dispense with about 
half the weight of iron to secure the same 
holding power obtainable from the com- 
mon form of anchor. 

There can be no doubt whatever of the 
great superiority of this anchor on small 
vessels, say below S00 or 1,000 tons. Ex- 
perience alone must determine its success, 
when heavier masses of iron are put into 
this shape for holding larger ships. What 
has already been demonstrated renders it a 
matter of earnest desire with many, that 
the anchor should be submitted to a thor- 
ough trial, under all conditions and for tho 
largest class of vessels. If an anchor can 
be made with one-half, or even one-quarter 
the metal now employed, to render equally 
effective the present form of anchor, the 
fact is one of great commercial importance. 
The Admiral commanding the Navy Yard, 
and other officers of the navy, have at a 
previous trial, pronounced this better than 
an ordinary anchor of equal weight. It 
was the testimony of Capt. Bailey com- 
manding the Wyanda, and the nautical 
gentlemeu present at the trial on Thursday, 
that Mr. Barlow's anchor, which in this in- 
stance weighed 598 pounds, was fully as 
effective as one of the ordinary make, be- 
ing 1,000 pounds. In view of these facts, 
and this testimony, we trust that some one 
will have the enterprise and energy to put 
a little capital against Mr. B's ingenuity, 
and hereby possibly introduce a new, ef- 
ficient and economical anchor, and in so 
doing, secure a future for themselves. 



Lectures by Miss Dickinson. — Lovers 
of popular lectures will receive the an- 
nouncement of the course of lectures in 
this city by Miss Anna E. Dickinson with 
pleasure. The great interest which has in- 
variably beeu manifested in her speaking 
throughout the Atlantic States, has created 
a strong desire in the minds of intelligent 
people of this coast to listen to her cele- 
brated lectures. We shall expect to see 
crowded houses, and from our own expe- 
rience we are quite sure that all who attend 
will be richly rewarded for their presence. 
Miss Dickinson is an earnest friend of the 
mental and physical welfare of the working 
classes, and speaks in an independent man- 
ner of their rights and follies. The subjects 
of her first course are as follows : Monday 
evening, "What Next;" Wednesday, "A 
Struggle for Life;" Friday, "Nothing 
Unreasonable." 



New Sooks. 

The New West, or California in 1SG7-S. by Charles Lor- 
Ing Brno.-. New Vurk: Putnjun ,v Bob. 12 mn. pp. 'S'A 

Mr. Brace has a wide porsonal acquaint- 
ance as a working philanthropist, and is not 
only a very amiable person but the author 
of a number of works of excellent quality 
and possessing a tone that seems to agree 
well with tho man; such as " Home Life in 
Germany," "The Races of theOld World," 
"Hungary in 1851," etc. In this book he 
has nsod his own traveler's sense, and good 
taste, with all the aid of existing published 
information regarding our resources, in giv- 
i inghisown impressions touching such ques- 
] tions as have a bearing upon the problem 
of making iu rural California a home. To 
i old residents even, the work contains much 
i suggestive matter, as it discusses many ques- 
tions brought to a more practical issne in our 
midst since the completion of the Pacific 
Railroad, though containing in the main 
matter that has been seen by most readers 
in another shape. Some of the more origi- 
nal chapters aro on " The Effect of Climate 
on Race in California," "Where to Settle 
in California," "Professional Robbers," 
" The Chinese," etc. 

Bancroft's Guide for the Pacific States, for travellers 
by railway, stago, and steam navigation; comprising 
routes and modes of travel, distances, fares, descrip- 
tions, maps etc., etc. 

To live in the blessed 19th century, the 
age of inventions and communication by 
steam, is not to exist within one narrow 
horizon for half a life-time without a break; 
but steam having given us wings, we are 
like birds of passage and flit whither we 
list, for pleasure or profit; and we know 
and enjoy, in consequence, very much 
more than has been possible to our good 
grandfathers. The railroad and traveler's 
Guide Book has become as greata necessity 
as the Bill of Fare, or the Market itself. 
Bancroft & Co., the enterprising pub- 
lishers, (who keep a sentinel on the watch 
for every new demand from our roving and 
prospecting constituents,) have just pub- 
lished a new guide under the above title, 
of the size and appearance of Appleton's 
Railroad Guide, — of Bradshaw, and all the 
French and German railroad publications, — 
pp. 137, containing time tables, maps, etc., 
which strike every old Californian espe- 
cially who aims to inform himself con- 
stantly of the resources and growth of 
surrounding or distant sections, as exceed- 
ingly well worth having. So easy is it to 
travel, and to see for one's self in 1869, 
that nothing but a complete guide has been 
wanting, for a person casually thinking of 
any heretofore inaccessible point, to wish 
himself there and to be there without fur- 
ther ado. The price is 50 cents. 
Practical Specifications of Works, executed in Ar- 
chitecture, Civil and Mechanical Engineering, Road- 
making and Sewerage; to which are added a series of 
useful agreements and reports. By John Blenkaru, 
C. E. and architect. Philadelphia; H. C. Baud. 1868. 
8 vo. pp. 41G. 

Projectors of promising and important 
enterprises are not always wide-awake as to 
the financial details essential to the begin- 
nings of carrying out. Here lies the wide 
gap between all the fine plans that are con- 
ceived, and their execution. There exists, 
accordingly, a class of more practical and 
less presuming engineers, who are some- 
times called contractors and sometimes 
boss laborers, and whose care and specialty 
it is to be clear on all questions of cost, 
and specification in detail. The present 
work is intended to assist engineers and 
architects with examples and methods 
chiefly of specifications accompanied by 
plans, in the acquisition of such all-im- 
portant practical points in the business of 
an engineer in full reputation and activity, 
as could otherwise be acquired only by 
many years' of experience. 



Coai.. — At tho Bellingham Bay coal 
mines machinery has been set at work to 
pump the water out, which will take to the 
1st of July. The machinery throws out 
about four tons of water per minute. 

A new discovery of coal lias been made 
in Snohomish County (W. T.) , which pros- 
pects well. 



The "Avitor." 

Very warm and hopeful things are said 
in favor of F. Marriott's aerial machine, 
by those who went out to witness the sev- 
eral tests made last Sunday — which make 
us regret that wo did not avail ourselves of 
the opportunity to be amongst the num- 
ber. 

Among other notices given by the re- 
porters of the San Francisco daily press, 
wo quote the following from the Times of 
Monday : 

The day was beautiful, but unfortunately 
the strong wind which prevailed prevented 
as thoi'ough a trial as was desired. But the 
inventor, Mr. Frederick Marriott, of this 
city, who has been at work for eighteen 
years on the subject of aerial navigation, 
has now the proud satisfaction of standing 
where Fulton did when he made his first 
steamboat. He has secured, beyond doubt, 
a firm foundation around which inventors 
of all civilized nations will cast their offer- 
ings of improvements until the air will be 
traversed by men as safely as it now is by 
the birds. The problem is solved — aerial 
navigation is no longer a question of 
doubt. 

The Aerial Carriage. 

The carriage, which is merely a large 
working model, is a balloon, shaped liked 
a cigar, both ends coming to a point. It 
is 37 feet long, 11 feet from top to bottom, 
and 8 feet in width. These are the meas- 
urements at the center of the balloon, from 
which point it gradually tapers off toward 
either end. Around the balloon length- 
wise, and a little below the center, is a 
light frame work of wood and cane, 
strongly wired together and braced. At- 
tached to this frame, and standing up as 
they approach the front of the carriage, are 
two wings, one on either side. They are 
each five feet wide at a little back of the 
center of the carriage, and do not com- 
mence to narrow down until they approach 
the front, where they come to a point. 
These wings are made of white cloth fast- 
ened to a light frame work, which is braced 
securely by wires. The main frame is se- 
cured in place by means of strong ribbons 
which go over the balloon and are attached 
to corresponding portions of the frame on 
the other side. To the frame at the hind 
part of the carriage is attached a rudder 
or steering gear, which is eactly the shape 
of the paper used in pin darts, four plans 
at right angles. This, when raised or low- 
ered, elevates ordepresses the head of the 
carriage when in motion; and when turned 
from side to side guides the carriage as a 
rudder does a boat. At the center and the 
bottom of the balloon is an indentation, or 
space left in the material of which it is 
built, in which the engiue and machinery 
are placed on frame work. Theengineand 
boiler are very diminutive specimens, but 
they do their work handsomely. The 
boiler and furnace are together only a little 
over a foot long, four inches wide and five 
or six inches in hight. Steam is gener- 
ated by spirit lamps. The cylinder is two 
inches in diameter and has a three-inch 
stroke. The crank connects by means of 
cog-wheels, with tumbling-rods which lead 
out to the propellers, one on either side of 
the carriage. The propellers are each two 
bladed, four feet in diameter, and are 
placed in the frame work of the wings. 
The boiler is made to carry eight pounds of 
steam. When not inflated, the carriage 
weighs eighty-four pounds. The balloon 
has a capacity for 1,360 feet of gas. When 
inflated and ready for a flight it is calcu- 
lated to have the carriage weigh from four 
to ten pounds. 

Public Trial Yesterday. 
The 8:30 a. m. train to San Jose, yester- 
day, carried to Shell Mound about 100 in- 
vited guests to witness the public trial of 
Marriott's Aerial Carriage. On arriving at 
the scene the. Avitor works were found 
with door open and the carriage just com- 
ing out into the open air. The wind was 
blowing quite hard, and coming in gusts it 
was found that it would be impossible to 
have a satisfactory trial out of doors. By 
holding on to the guys and frame work in 
this wind caused the carriage to be severely 
strained, and finally it was taken back into 
the works. The room where it was built 
is quite large, resembling in construction 
the Mechanics' Pavilion in this city. Steam 
was raised and the carriage, obeying its 
propellers, raised several feet from the 
floor and started forward at rapid pace. 
Persons having the guys in hand stopped 
it at the end of the hall, and turning it 
around it sailed back. The party congre- 
gated cheered heartily. But the trips were 
not satisfactory to those having it in charge, 



and on looking the balloon over they found 
that it was leaking quite badly. It was 
taken to the pipe leading to the gasometer 
and the process of filling it up and stop- 
ping the leak was commenced. When 
ready and moved ont for a start a large 
rent occurred at one of the seams near one 
of the propellers. This was sewed up and 
made tight, but on refilling the balloon, it 
gave way several times. Finally, about 
half past one p. m., damages were repaired 
and the carriage moved off for another 
trial. This time it was a complete suc- 
cess. While yet the machine remained, 
as it wore, perfectly dormant, resting upon 
the floor with less than sufficient buoyancy 
to raise itself — requiring additional aid to 
relieve it from connection with earth — the 
machinery was put in motion and the pro- 
pellers commenced their revolutions. At 
once life was imparted to the whole body, and 
it arose promptly and gracefully and took 
its flight into the air under guidance of the 
rudder, thus establishing the astounding 
fact that it had power and could fly; and 
giving proof that the grand problem had 
been solved. The carriage mounted nearly 
to the roof with a firmness and steadiness 
equal to the movements of an ocean steamer 
upon smooth water. The guests cheered 
long and loud, and many fairly danced 
with delight at the success. The trip back 
and forth was performed several times 
with the same success. Finally the car- 
riage was taken out into the open air and 
held while several photographs were taken. 
" As to the shape of the model (writes a 
correspondent of the Herald), just imagine 
a large and very thick cigar, thirty feet 
long and fifteen in diameter. From the 
bottom, and midway, there is a large open 
cut, in the shape of a V, running up to 
the center. The boiler is placed in the 
lower part of this cut, and the engine a 
little above. A light wooden rib encircles 
the balloon lengthwise, and divides it into 
two equal parts. From the head there are 
two wings of light cloth, in the shape of a 
jib, attached to the rib and held extending 
horizontally by a frame. These wings ex- 
tend beyond the cut, and their breadth is 
then increased to about five feet A pro- 
peller in the center on each side, about 
four feet in hight, within and at right 
angles, with the wings, is worked by the 
engine. The rudder is five feet long. It 
is formed, as we might say, of four cloth 
rudders attached together at right angles, 
longitudinally." 

The editor of the Transcript says: " The 
model possessed a gas capacity of 1,360 
feet, and a total weight of 80 pounds. The 
gas supply was insufficient to raise the 
Avitor from the ground; but as soon as the 
little engine started the propeller, the ma- 
chine lifted itself from the ground, and 
gracefully commenced its flight through 
the air. It was kept from going out of 
sight by two cords attached to it in the 
hands of persons on the ground. Its mo- 
tion was regular, and without any of the 
swaying which might naturally have been 
anticipated, and its speed, with 90 revolu- 
tions of the propellers to the minute, was 
between four and five miles an hour. The 
rudder acted well, guiding the airship 
perfectly." 

A company has been formed, comprising 
the names of a number of well known and 
substantial citizens, for the purpose of 
constructing a full-sized aerial ship. 

Steps have already been taken to protect 
the inventor's rights, through the agency 
of this office. We expect to say more of 
the Avitor soon, and publish an engraving 
of its appearance on an aerial voyage. 

A Silver Plated Locomotive. — The 
locomotive "America," built at Patterson, 
N. J., in 1867, and sent to the Paris Expo- 
sition, has been brought back to New York, 
and jmrchased by the Rock Island Railroad 
Company. An exchange says it "will 
open the route to Omaha. An effort will 
be made to take it through to San Fran- 
cisco. This locomotive is the finest speci- 
men of workmanship of this kind ever 
manufactured in the country, and cost 
$60,000. The boiler is silver plated, the 
smoke stack of German silver, and the en- 
gine house inlaid with hard wood. The 
tender is beautifully veneered, the word 
"America" being set in different varieties 
of wood letters. All the bright work is 
splendidly polished, the bell, whistle and 
dome being heavily silver-plated." 

Scientific men say that the time of the 
diurnal revolution of the earth is gradually 
being shortened on account of shrinkage of 
the earth by cooling iu the interior. 



26 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 10, 1869. 



Professional Cards- 
Notice To Mining Companies. 

The undersigned offers his services to the mining public. 
Having devoted several years to the study of mining and 
metallurgy In soine 01 the best schools and works ol 
Europe ami being acquainted With the metallurgical treat- 
ment of ores as practiced on this coast, he is confident of 
his ability to render valuable aid to parties employing him. 
C«A«. C. K4JEG£tt. 

Address, care of Mining and Scieiiiinc Press. 23vl8 

J. S. PHILLIPS, M. E., 

CONSTJLTINO ENGINEER, 
Examiner of Mine*, etc., 

4S3 Washington street San Francisco. 

(Having had 33 years' experience in Europe and America,) 
supplies drawings and designs for Pumping, Hoisting, 
Crushing Separating, Roasting, Chlorlnizing, Hilling, Lix- 
iviating, Pre ci pi latins, and Smelting Works. Minerals an- 
alyzed, and advice given for beueticiul treatment. Les- 
sons ou the Discrimination arid Assay of Minerals by Blow- 
pipe, Chemicals, Scorifier and Crucible. 4vl7tf 



JOHN EOACH, Optician, . 

Has removed from 522 Montgomery street to 
filO Washington street. 

East of Montgomery. 



JA.HES M. TAYLOR, 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 

Court Block, 636 Clay Street 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
2vl5-lo.y 



GILES H. GRAY. JIMKS M. BAVEH. 

GRAY & HAVEN, 

ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW, 
In Building of Pacific Insurance Co., N. E. corner Cali- 
fornia an. Leidetdortf streets, 
27vW SAW FRANCISCO. 

DR. KNOWLES, Dentist, 

HAS REMOVED FROM MONTGOMERY 
• to 331 Kearny street, west side, between 
a Pine and Bush, Son Francisco. 
• 21vl8-ly 



^ MEUSSDORFFER, ^, 

HAT MANUFACTURER 

And dealer In 

Hats and Caps 

AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

835 and G37 Commercial street San Franciscr. 

125 J street Sacra' men to. 

Corner of D and Second streets Marysville. 

72 Kront street Portland, Oregon. 

Onr wholesale House, 628 Commercial street, extending 
through to 637 Clay street, Sun Francisco, contains always 
a most choice, and the largest, assortment In this State. 
Every Steamer brings the latest issued novelties from Eu 
rope and New York, which can be found at all the above 
stores, at moderate prices. . 23vlti-3m 



PACIFIC 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF SAX FRANCISCO, CAL. t 

Office. No. 422 California street. 



Cash Assets, Jan. 1, 1869, 
FIRE, 



$1,530,740 18 



Metallurgy. 



MOSHEIMER'S 

PIONEER MINING- SCHOOL, 



METALLTURCHC "WORKS. 

Having established the first Practical Mining and Metal- 
lurgical School In the United States, I would call the at- 
tention of gentlemen who may wish to obtain a practical 
knowledge of 

Chemistry, Assaying and Metallurgy, 

That I am prepared to teach all the above branches in les 
time than in any European School. 

I also undertake to assay and work any kind of ore, or 
mineral substances. 

For terms, apply to JOS. AEOSREI1UEER, 

Practical Chemist and Metallurgist. 

Office, 328 Montgomery street; Metallurgic Works, 2005 
Powell street, San Francisco 6vl8-6m 



LEOPOLD KUH, 
Aesayer and Metallurgical Chemist) 

(Formerly of the U. S. B. Mint, S. F.) 
Office, No. Oil Commercial Street, opposite 

the Mint, San Fruuclsco. 

BULLION MELTED AND ASSAYED, 
The correctess of which is guaranteed in every respect 
AUklndsof Ore and Mineral tested, assayed and analyzed 
in the most satisfactory manner. 

Refers by permission to W. C. Ralston, Cashier Bank ot 
California; Messrs. Pioche A Bayeroue, Wm, M. Lent, John 
D. Fry, E. CuhlU & Co., A. K. Orim, President Pacific Union 
Express Co.; John M. Eckfeldt, M. and R. U. S B. Mint; 
Hale & Norcross S. M. Co., and the principal mining com 
panles on the Comstock Lode. 25vl7-tf 



PROF. HENRY "WURTZ, 

Formerly Chemical Examiner in the U. S. Patent Office 
may be employed professionally as a Scientific Exprkt. 
Geological Examinations and Reports, Analysis and Assays, 
etc-, etc. Pracnca lad vice and Investigations in the Chem 
icalArts and Manufactures. Invention and rxair>ination 
of new chemical methods nnd products. Address, 26 Pine 
street, Rooms 35 and 36, New York. Always in from 12 to 
8.3U. 05r"Writtuu communications preferred. 

Important to Gold and Silver Min- 
ers and Companies. 
rrohvessor -wtrirrz, 

Who is the Inventor and Patentee of the new and wonder 
I'ul uses of SODIUM IN WORKING COLD AND SILVER 
ORES AND JEWELERS' SWEEPINGS, will furnish at the 
above address information in relation thereto, together 
With experimental packages of 

SODIUM AMALGAM. 

All instructions and experiments elsewhere oMained arc 
spurious and unreliable. WORKING EXPERIMENTS ON 
AMALGAMATION OF ORES, Etc. Prof. W. has in opera 
tion In New York a large and small Hepburn Pan, for work 
Iiik 1.0UO or 20-lb. charges of material lor experimenta 
purposes. bv!7-ly 



H. TAYLOR. TVM. H. TAYLOIE. 

ROBERT TAYLOR & CO., 
SMELTING WORKS, 

Twelfth street, between Folsom nud Hownr:!. 

GA LVANIZIN G. 

Also, Antl-Frletlon, Alloys* for Jonrnalx, Type 

and Stamping Metal*, Tinners and 

Plumbers' Solder, .Etc. 

Ijgp-Tue best price given for the meat rebellious or re 
fractory ores. Ores and mineralsassayed and analyzed. 
ISAAC BLVXOM£, A K enl, 
4vl8-3m N. E. cor. Washington and Battery streets. 



Business Cards. 



RODG-ERS, MEYER & CO., 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

ADTA5CIS MADE 
On all kinds of Ores, nnd particular attention 

PAID TO 

(OSSISKMESTS OF GOODS. 
4yl6-3m 



CA.RX> PICTURES, 

ONE DOLLAE PER DOZEN. 

And Photographs, Ambvotypes and Sun Pearls, by first 

class artists, at the lowest rates, 

4-t SILVA'S, C4 Third Street, 



N. GRAY & CO., 

UTJ-DEI&Tji.IKER* 

611 Sacramento St., cor. Webb, San Francisco. 



Farmers and Mechanics 
B^NK OF SAYINGS, 

No. "■$'£'* San»«me Street. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Money Loaned on Heal Estate. 
H. BUTTON, President. 

GEO. M. CONDEE Cashier. 19vl6-3m 



m. a. eucKKLKw. 



GEO. LAMB. 



BUCKELEW & CO., 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Choice Teas, Groceries and Provisions. 

5SO Market street, 

Below Montgomery street 17vl8-3m 



-W. T. ATWOOD, 

PURCHASER OF 

COPPEE OBES, BAES, MATT Etc., Etc,, 

505 MonlEomery street, San Francisco, 

The highest market price paid for ores assaying It) per cent, 
and upwards aSvL7qr 



Farms and City Property. 

C. If. WAKEI.EE «fe uo„ 

OOl California street, S, W. Corner Kcnrny street, buy and 
sell Farmsand City Real Estate. Parlies wishing to Invest 
will nnd it to their Interest to call on the . 13vl8-3m 



Pump Leather. 

The attention of MINING COMPANIES, and others re • 
qnirlng a superior article for Hydraulic purposes, is Invited 
to tho heavy Oaked Tanned Pump Leather, manufactured 
and prepared expressly by the undersigned. 



r ANH E^ 

N E. JONES&C? , 

Constantly on hand and lor sale by 



Trades and Manufactures. 



WB. BAKTLING. «ENRY KIMBALL. 

BARTLING & KIMBALL, 
BOOI£BII>fI>EIS.!S, 

Paper Eulers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

505 Clay street, (southwest cor. Sansome), 
15vl2-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



JOHN DAMEL, 

(SUCCESSOR TO O. GOBI) 

MARBLE WORKS, 

No. 421 Pine st. bet. Montgomery and Kearny, San Francisco 

Mantels, Monument*, Tombs, Flnnibera' Slabf $ 

Etc., On hand and Manufactured to order. 
9®- Goods shipped to all parts of the State. Orders re 
spectfulb solicited. 6v8-3m 



J. M. STOCKMAN, 

Manufacturer of 
PATTERNS ANT> MODELS, 

(Over W. T. Garratt's Brass Foundry, 
S. B. Corner of Mission and Fremont 8ts. f 
6vl4tf SAN FRANCISCO 



&SAN FRANCISCO MILL. 

HOBBS, GILMORE & CO., 
Ma»Titf»OTtixrers of Boxes, 

MarKet Street, bet. Benle and 'Alain, 



J. J. JONES, 

CARPENTER and BUILDER, 

No. iiS-1 <Jack,son street, between Sansome nnd 

Battery, 



W. C. CAMPBELL. 

PATTERS. AND MODEL MAKER, 
No. ISO Fremont street, over Phamlx Iron Works, San 

Francisco. 
Particular attention given to MODELS for the Patent Office 
Brands and Pattern Letters Cut. 4vl8mtf 



J. F. PAGES, 

© 13 A L ENGRAVER, 
AN» LETTER CUTTER, 

Brass and Steel Stamps and Dies, COS Sacramento street, 

San Francisco. Orders by express promptly attended to. 

Cvl6 



DESKS AND OFFICE FURNITURE. 
JOHNSON~& BEST, 

Manufacturers of a)) kinds of 

Deslvs and Office Fxirnitvire, 

717 Market street, neariThlrd, np Stnlrs. 

Wnrerooms, 413 Pino street, Rues Block, 

always or 

ihlnet Woi 

18vl7qr 



SAN FKANCISCO 

Pioneer Screen "Woirlts, 

JOHN W. QUICK, Manufacturer, 
Removed to A. Prltzcl's Iron Works, an Fromont street, 



■ J '.rr_ r-5'.^/ 






j SBMt 3 U ! l.*--J 

i > tfT r..: j .i i i 






■ • " I ■' ■" 

i ■ r . . 



Ji-lt 10, 1869.] 



Ti\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



27 



The Humboldt Mines, Nevada. 

Our business agent writes as follows of 
some of the mines in Humboldt County, 
Nevada: 

Unionville is about twenty miles from 
Reese liiver, in Humboldt County. It is a 
fine, thriving and prosperous town, with 
three quartz mills runnim: night and day. 
The first one aa I approached was that be- 
longing to the Silver M. Co. This mill 
now has five .stamps in operation, but will 
soon add five more. The superintendent, 
Mr. Stewart, informs me that tho rock is 
paying very well — from $35 to S1U0 to the 
ton; while there is some that pays much 
better by shipping to Europe for reduction. 
Of this they are sending off large quanti- 
ties every few days. It is black and full 
of sulplmrcts, yielding all tho way from 
paying rates to Sl,0UO per ton. 

Fall's Mill. 
The next mill reached was Fall's, which 
is running ten stamps and doing well. This 
company has a new engine on the ground, 
which will bo Tunning in a few days. 
Times are lively here, and there is water 
enough to make power for running fifty 
mills with lurgo stamps; but fuel is very 
scarce. Mr. Fall has been using sage 
brush, and has teams constantly employed 
in hauling it to the mill. 

Placer Diggings 

have been struck six miles from this camp, 
where two companies are working, with 
results of from SI to §6 per day to the 
hand. They have plenty of water. 

The Arizona Mine 
is about two and a half miles from Union- 
ville, up the canon, and on the side of a 
very precipitous mountain. The company 
has a very fine ledge, from four to ten feet 
thick. Through the kindness of the super- 
intendents, Messrs. Boss and Brackett, I 
was shown through the mine, which is 
owned by the company that has the mills 
at Unionville. There is a tunnel 400 feet 
long, with drifts running south and two 
chutes running up to the top of the hill. 
I could see an abundance of native silver 
and chloride all through the white quartz. 
Mr. Stewart has some thirty men em- 
ployed, and Messrs. Fall & Co. have thirty- 
four in the mine, working day and night 
The ore is very rich. One of these com- 
panies own the original mine, and the other 
is an extension of the same, south. The 
two companies use the same tunnel for 
bringing out their ore, which is hauled to 
the mill by oxen. There are, no doubt, 
many other valuable mines in this neigh- 
borhood, which will eventually be brought 
to light by some industrious prospectors. 

A Sulphur Mine. 
Mr. Spence is opening a sulphur mine 
near the Humboldt House, and about 800 
feet from the C. P. Railroad. He is now 
down about 28 feet, and it is expected that 
the company with which he is connected 
will fit up refining works at an early day. 
The deposit is a very promising one. 



GEO. E. ROG-ERS, 

(SucucjMor to G. W. Bell.) 

A. S S A. Y E R. , 

512 < ;ilil'<.i-iii;t. *t., San Frunciaco. 

J. A. MARS, Aesayor. 

Ores carefully Assayed. Gold and Mlver Ores worked. 



CALIFORNIA 

BUSINESS UNIVERSITY 

204 Montgomery Street. 

Full Particulars reifardluzo t Practical Cnursoof Studio 
may be ti.utbr calling at tho University, or by addressing 
17vl7-qyUp !£- '*- UeJAL.U, San Francisco, 



WINDMILL 

For Sale Cheap ! 



Entirely New «.nd of Modem tiud Approved 
Style. 

For particulars apply to or address this office. 



California Steam Navigation 



is. 



asBSMa 



COMPANY, 



CARLOS 0'DOMELL'S 

California Cordial Tonic, 

—os— 

Wilol Cherry Bittern* 

TRADE Q t 0. D. MARK. 



ThU elegant preparation Is arknowledged by all who have 
used It to bo the most etneient romedy lor every disease of 
tho 

STOM.VCn A X I» BOWELS, 

Yet Introduced to the notice of tho public. Immediately on 
[.'km; a doM ul It, the patient will rind n genial glow per- 
vadlntj his entire system, and Its steady use lor a short 
time will be fallowed by a healthy appetite and a good di- 
gestion, even tti the case of the must confirmed dyspeptic. 
To all who are suffering from 

INDIGESTION, 

DYSPEPSIA, 

DYSENTERY, 

DIARRHCEA, 

NERVOUS AFFECTIONS, 

Or any of tho manifold troubles caused by a diseased action 
of tho Btomacli, this rcmody le confidently recommended 
as a safe and certain cure. 

X- B. JACOBS A- CO., Sole Agents, 
15vl8-3m 433 Front street, San FruncUco. 




LEA & PERRINS' 

CKLrBBlTKD 

WORCESTERSHIRE 8A.TJCE 

Declared by connnlseurs 
to be tho only 

GOOD SAUCE. -rj 

— s 

The success or this most g 
delicious and unrivalled £ 
condiment having caused 
certain dealers to apply the name of "Wor- ■£ 
cestershire Sauce 10 their own inferior 2 
Compounds, the public is hereby Informed "^ 
that the only way to secure the genuine, m 
id to ask for d 

J.ea «& Ferrlns' Sauce, G 

o 
and see that their names are upon the £ 
wrapper, labels, stopper, and bottle. £• 

Su.no of l he foreign markets having been d 
supplied with a spurious Worcestershire O 
Siuco, upon tho wrapper and labels of 
which the n imes of Lea and Ferrim h-ivn heen forsred, L 
and P. give notice that they hive furnished their corres- 
pondents with nmvur of attorney to take instant proceed- 
ings against MauulaoLuee-nj and Vendors at such, or any 
other imitation* be which (heir right mar be infringed. 

Ask for LEA .t PRRIUNS' Sauce, and see name on the 
Wrapper. Label. Bottle, innl Stonpcr, 

Wholesale and for Export by the Proprietors, Worcester; 
Crosse & Black well, London, etc.. etc.; and by Grocers and 
Oilmen universally. Agents, CROSS &. CO., San Fran- 
cisco. 3vlfl-Sm 




PAIEBANK'S PATENT 




PLATFORM SCALES! 

A'so, large Scales for weighing loaded wagons of Ore, 
Hay, etc.. from fi.riOO lo iO.OUO pounds capacity. Manufac- 
turer's Bianch House, 

FAIKBA.VKS <Ss HUTCHINSON, 

12(1 California street, San Francisco. 
Agents for Baldwin's Improved Money Drawers, 

gjj" Si.'.ml n>r a Catalogue. 18vlrteow6m 



.j AND THE 



AXLEGGEASE 



That will rculst the extreme* of heat and 
cold will. out lttjin.-;".\ lujr or hardening. 

It is therefore peculiarly adapted to*the varied p." — 
this coast, especially localities where T"~- 
BECOMES EXCESSIVELY HOT, <- 
kinds! of grease to run from th~ 
position. It remains r 
deposit of GUM. T< " 
properties, du- 
approved ' 
EG*' 



Ayer's 




For restoring Gray Hair to 
ils natural Vitality and Color. 

A dressing which 
is at once agreeable, 
healthy, and effectual 
for preserving the 
hair. Faded or gray 
hair is won restored 
lo ils original color 
with the gloss and 
freshness of youth. 
Thin hair is thick- 
ened, falling hair checked, and bald- 
ness often, though not always, cured 
by its use. Nothing can restore the 
hair where the follicles are destroyed, 
or the glands atrophied and decayed. 
But such as remain can be saved for 
usefulness by this application. Instead 
of fouling the hair with a pasty sedi- 
ment, it will keep it clean and vigorous. 
Its occasional use will prevent the hair 
from turning gray or falling off, and 
consequently prevent baldness. Free 
from those deleterious substances which 
make some preparations dangerous and 
injurious to the hair, the Vigor can 
only benefit but not harm it. II' wanted 
merely for a 

HAIR DRESSING, 

nothing else can be found so desirable. 
Containing neither oil nor dye, it does 
not soil white cambric, and yet lasts 
long on the hair, giving it a rich glossy 
lustre and a grateful perfume. 

Prepared by Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., 

Practical and Analytical Chemists, 

LOWEIili, MASS. 

PBICB $1.00. 

Sold by all druepists and dealers in medicine every- 
where. Crane A llrigham. San Kranoisuo; K II McDon- 
ald k Co., Sacramento. General Agents. 25vl8eow4m 



wonderful Invcution!— To Housekeeper*! 
NEW METHOD OF 

WASHING CLOTHES 

WITHOUT LABOR. 
JOHN REIST'S Celebrated Patent Automatic 

CLOTHES WASHER AND BOILER. 

&R k /j o 




This Boi'or is most effectual, reliable, and universally 
rccommen led; find id the first BEL.!' 1 - ACTING, PORTABLE 
WASH BOILER, lor household purposed ever made, and 
strange to sny. has never been improved, as nearly all oth- 
ers, "which are infringements," have proved total fail- 
ures. See decision U. S Patent Office, November d, 1863. 

See ltd wonderful oDcrn i inn and you cannot do without 
It. WM. FRIEL, Agent for San Franciaco, 

Denier in Stoves and Tinware, 
25vl 3m 67 and 69 Fourth st., bet. Mission and Jessie sts. 



The Perfection of Prepared O 



MARAVILT 



Sole Propricto- 



Tho Coco- 
of Lint 1 
wh>" 




New Almaden Vichy Water, 



(CALIFORNIA VICIIY WATER.) 

FROM THE SPIfclJYGrM, 

NEW ALMADEN, 

Santa Clara County. 

P. L. A. PIOODE Proprietor. 

O. CHAVVLV Agent. 

OFFICE* SOfl Jit'ksO.V STIIEET, 

GENERAL DEPOT: 

Corner of«7ack.«on and Montgomery streets. 

This Mineral Water is especially useful and very power- 
ful, not only In the course of certain diseases, Uut'afso as a 
preventive of Intermittent lever, chronic rheumatism, 
gout, scrofula, general debility arising from disorder of tho 
nervous system and circulation of the blood, and especially 
of tho vciuous circulation. 

It I;- necessary to observe, in this connection, that, since 
the notion of this water is very powerful, it must be used in 
cases of sickness with thk advick. op a physician, for 
there are cases wh-re a patient could not mnke use of it 
with impunity, at least m the beginning of a course of 
treatment!"). On the other hand, the composition of Vichy 
Water renders It highly elhcacious as an adjuvant to tbe 
action of certain medicines v. hich, without It, could not be 
digested, and would thcrclore remain Ineffectual. It Is a 
fact that, for some diseases, tttc action of this Mineral 
Water cannot bo etilcaeious without the use of certain med- 
icines which the physician only can properly prescribe. 
The omission of thai precaution is the reason why many 
patieuts do not find in mineral waters in general all tho 
relief they might otherwise derive from thein. 

California Vichy Water is used with success in many 
cases, such as— 

Impoverishment of ihe Blood; Weakness of Nervous 
System; Chronic Inflammation of Liver. Stomach, Spleen, 
Spine, Womb, Intestines, Ovaries, and Inflammation gen- 
erally, Khun Mere in nofeccr: Dyspepsia in all ils stages; Loss 
of Appetite; Bad Digestion; Flatulency ; Cot mi ant and Te- 
nacious Vomiting; Weakness ol certain Organs; tlie indis- 
positions peculiar to Women; Frequent Uterine Hemor- 
rhage; Uemorrhoides; Obstruction of Liver and Spleen; 
Night Sweats; Chronic Rheumatism, vhen without fecer; 
Gout, when flu patii&it it Mill able to voile; Gravel, and in cases 
of Diabetes, the New Almaden Vichy Water is a most pow- 
erful adjuvant to the remedies prescribed tor this terrible 
disease. 

(•) Besides its Medicinal qualities, this Mineral Water Is 
a most agreeable beverage at meals, or at any time of the 
day, pure or mixed with Water, Beef Broth, Red Wine, 
White Wine, Champagne, Brundy, Milk, elc. 

PRICE— 12 Bottles, at the General Depot, $1. Returned 
Bottles Bought for Five Cents apiece. 

Twenty-four Half Bottles, S5. Returned Bottles Bought 
for 50 cents per dozen. 25vlStf 



Mining Property for Sale. 

A. T-vro Thirds Intex-est 

OF THB 

Golden Rule Mining Company's 

Claims and 3X111, 
Situated in Tuolumne County, California, two and a half 
miles south of Jamestown, on the Great Mother Quartz 
Lode. A good 15-stamp Water Power QuarizMlll issituated 
on the property, wllh a never-failing supply of water, as 
can be shown by the last four years continual running. 
This Claim has three parallel Ledges, from 50 to 100 feet 
apart, averaging from two to Bix (eet in width, with a ion- 
of six hundred feet. They are so situated that a tu* 
heen run through ihem at right angles, mat-' 
drainage of from seventy to eighty ft 1 ' 
mine. The mine Is well ventilated 
face, and well timbered so far - 



both mill and mine v 

On the surface 
these veinp. 
miners. • 



. )..: UK SJUUJ 

..■,. ylj,,, i ft 
i'-.!v ^'Uvtw: 



Steamer CAPITAL 

CURYSOPOLTS., 

YOP.EMITE 

" CORNELIA .. 
JULIA.... 
Two of [)'» 
at 4 o' 
for 





,. rv"V.-; 




• <-1'h ■■-': - ' 



i,l »a,»w . =gs ■;■( 

,MI11 ■;;.'■ 



■ '.'.■',■•■ 
■ ■ ■■ L» i >■ i .*r* >tV 

JUT, ■ m, "■• - ■ 



28 



Tr\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 10, 1869. 



Inventions and ^Patents. 



New Patents Issued to Pacific Coast 
Inventors. 

[Fbom Official Reports to DEWEY & CO., TJ. S. and 

Foreign Patent Agents, and Publishers of 

the Mining and Scientific Press.] 

Copies of XI. S. Patent. Claims furnished immedi- 
ately at small cost. Full copies of American or 
Foreign Patents can be obtained by telegraph or 
mail through this office at favorable rates. 

For the Week Ending June 22d. 
Meat-Cutting Machine. — Jas. G. Divoll, 
Sonora, Gal.— 91,526. 
This invention relates to an improved 
apparatus for enttiDg or chopping meats, 
in order to reduce them to sufficiently 
small pieces to be fed into a machine for 
grinding it into sausage meat. It can also 
be used for cutting any vegetable substance 
■which it is desired to reduce in size. It 
consists of two eccentric knives, operated 
by proper mechanism inside of a closed 
case or box, in which the meats or vegeta- 
bles to be cut are first placed. The box is 
arranged to move back and forth, so that 
the knives will cut from side to side, thus 
bringing every portion of the substance to 
be cut under their action. 
Watek-Gloset Vai/VE. — W. Smith, San 

Francisco, Cal.— 91,574. 
Lettek-Box. — Fred. Wittram, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal.— 91,583. 
Obe-Washek and Concentrator. — Wm. 
G. Heslep and Thomas A. Cochrane, 
Jamestown, Cal.— 91,627. 
This invention is illustrated and fully 
described on the first page of the present 
issue. 

Mining Sluice eok Saving Sui/PHUrets. 
Orlando Jennings, North San Juan, Cal. 
91,638. " 

This invention was fully illustrated and 
described in our issue of April 24th. 
Gang-Plow.— J. W. Lewis, Oregon City, 

Oregon,— 91,643. 
Boller-Cutter for Plows. — J. W. Lewis, 

Oregon City, Oregon. — 91,644. 
Compound for Salve. — Nicholas Lumsden 
and Frank Lessman, Oakland, Cal. — 
91,647. 
Ellipsograph. — Andrew Smith, Dayton, 

Oregon.— 91,681. 
Pocket Knife. — Addison G. Waterhouse, 

San Francisco, Cal. — 91,693. 
Step-Ladder. — Charles Edward Boman, 

San Francisco, Cal— 91,706. 
Device for Treating Hides. — Herman 
Boyer, San Francisco, Cal. — 91,772. 
The above invention consists of a rare 
device for converting hides, in their raw 
and rough state, into leather, suitable for 
belts, lacings and other purposes, and is 
an improvement on a machine for which a 
patent was issued to the present patentee 
and his brother Louis, May 12, 1868. The 
invention consists in a device by which the 
hides, when properly secured in it, may be 
twisted each way, back and forth, until it 
becomes soft and pliable, without injury to 
the texture; thus rendering the hide so 
treated capable of being used for many 
purposes for which tanned, leather is ordi- 
narily employed. By the use of this de- 
vice the operation of preparing a raw hide 
in the manner indicated is readily, easily 
and quite perfectly accomplished. 
Seat for Vehicle. — Samuel S. Simmons, 
Watsonville, Cal.— 91,779. 
Every person is a benefactor to his race 
who eases the jolts and jars to which we 
are liable to be subjected. It is usually 
considered one of the " pleasures " of life 
to be rolled "gently along" a rough road 
in some wheeled vehicle, and thus be 
moved from place to place without violent 
exercise. This is true when we ride in a 
carriage borne upon yielding springs. But 
when we attempt to make the passage in 
one of our lumbering farm wagons, the 
exercise is often a little more than the rider 
bargained for. This inveutiou is intended 
to ameliorate affairs by providing an easy 
seat for the driver, as well as for others in 
the wagon, and is especially applicable to 
sulkies and gigs. The seat is mounted on 
an oscillating frame, and is held in an up- 
right position by springs placed on each 
side, at its lower end, which allows the 
seat to move from side to side, and permits 
the driver to maintain it in a vertical posi- 
tion at all times. Springs are also arranged 
so as to allow the seat to have a forward 
and backward motion, thus rendering it 



JOHN WEIGHT & CO. 



-DEALERS IN- 



picks ajst> pick h^jxi>:les. 




Sole Agents for "Washoe Tool Company, 

ITos. 13 and 15 Fremont sts., atNelson <Ss X>ot>le's, San Francisco. 



1 Round Eye 

2 

3 

i " 

5 


surface 
irrface 


4 

iH 

5 

5« 

6 

6hi 

7 

4 

4« 

5 

5« 

6 

6« 

7 

3« 

4 


I.IST OF 

IBS 


pbic 

$16 


ES 

No 


OF 

17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
2G 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 


PICKS: 

Drifting 


5% " 












...20 


Poll 


4 " 


20 


7 

8 Flat Eye s- 






.. 






ii 






it 




ii 






10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 Drifting... 






,, 






„ ' 




,, 












2!« " 

3« " 


15 

15 

16 






„ 


... 18 
... 18 



Also PICK EYES ready for the steel, for the Blacksmiths, which will 

be sold cheap. 



ISTE'W 



I wish to call special attention to my 

ADZE EYE PICK, 

Which was made under my own supervision while in New York. For BEAUTY, STRENGTH 
and DURABILITY, they are miequaled. 

JOHN WRIGHT. 



We have a large stock of EXTRA NO. 1 

WHITE HICKORY DRIFTING PICK HANDLES, 

WHICH WE OFFER CHEAP. 
CALL ATVO EXAMINE FOR YOURSELVES. 

16vl81am-3m 



much easier for the driver than where the 
seat is fixed. It also consists in providing 
movable or adjustable stirrups for the feet 
of the driver, with which he can more 
readily accommodate himself to the move- 
ments of the vehicle. 

For the Week Ending June 29th. 

Machine for Ktanizing Wood. — David 

W. Hunt, San Francisco, Cal.— 91,848, 

antedated June 22d, 1869. 
Flux foe Smelting Ores of Gold, Silver, 

>nd other Metals. — Chas. W. Moore, 

San Francisco, Cal. — 91,862. 
Amalgamator. — Geo. Stevens, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal.— 91,878. 
Dust-Deflector for Bailroad Cars.— J. 

P. O. Lownsdale, Portland, Oregon. — 

91,947. 
Process of Boasting Auriferous Sulphu- 

rets. — Wm. Bruckner, Central, Colorado 

Territory.— 92,009. 
Submarine Foundation. — Wm. H. Foye, 

San Francisco, Cal.— 92,033. 
Steam Engine Governor. — William H. 

Howland, San Francisco, Cal. — 92,051. 
Steam Engtne Valve. — William H. How- 

landj San Francisco, Cal. — 92,052. 
Gang Plow. — William B. Bice, Oakland, 

Oregon.— 92,099. 

The above list of patents will be noticed 
next week. 



Foreign Patents for Pacific Coast In- 
ventors. 

Frederick Gutzkow, of San Francisco, 
Cal.. has made application for a British 
patent on his " Process for preparing sul- 
phurets and obtaining pure silver there 
from, " through the London agents of the 
Mining and Scientific Press Patent 
Agency. Number of application, 1868 of 
1869. 

British Patent No. 762 of 1869 was sealed 
June 15th, granting to William Babcock, 
of San Francisco, Cal., a patent for "a 
new or improved preservative paint or com- 
position for protecting ships* bottoms, pre- 
serving submarine wood-work, and other 
useful purposes." This is the paint com- 
position for which a United States patent 
was recently issued to Henry Boundy, of 
this city, through the Mining and Scien- 
tific Press Patent Agency. The paint is 
now being manufactured in this city by 
the California Marine Metallic Paint Co. 



Address Wanted.— Wc arc desirous of communicating 
nlh Allen Oliver, lately of Jamestown, Tuolumne County, 
California. tf 



Returnkd.— Or J. H. Paine. Dentist, Wadsworth House. 
No. 225 Bush street, between the Occldentalnnd Cosmopoll 
tan Hotels, San Francisco. 21vl7-4m 



Photography,— For Cabinet Photographs, or Enameled 
Cards, of the very hese quality, you must go 'q the NEW 
YORK GALLERY, Nos. 25 and 27 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Every picture warranted to give satisfaction. 

iOvlS 6m B. F. HowLANn. 



Dr. nALL has. just returned from Europe a ficr an absence 
of one year, during which time he has visited England, 
Ireland, France and Germany, and lias held consultations 
with the following eminent physicians : Drs. Curling* 
Drult. Lee. Parker, Acton, Aitken, Churchill, Rlcord, Vel 
peau, Boech, Spcrino, and Dewilz. Many of the cases in 
which he held consultation with the above named eminent 
physicians were, we are sorry to say. those of Americans. 
Americans will not now be under the necessity of leaving 
the Pacific Coast for Medical Treatment, for Dr. HALL has 
brought with him every new mode of treatment known to 
the greatest nbysiclansof the world. To old residents of the 
Pacific Coa3t it is needless to mention the address; to new 
omers. however, it is necessary to mention that he may 
be found at the American Surgery and Dispensary, 402 
Montgomery street, opposite Wells, Fargo & Co's, San Fran- 
cisco. 21vlS3ra 



Cholera— Bow to Care it. — At the commence- 
ment of the diarrheal, which always precedes an attack 
of the cholera, take a teaspoonful of the Pain Killer in 
sugar aid water (hot if convenient), and then bathe freely 
the stomach and bowels with the Pain Killer clear. Should 
the diarrhoea or cramps continue, repeat the dose every 
fifteen or twenty minutes till the patient is relieved. In 
extreme cases two or more teaspoonfuls may be given at a 
dose. The Pain Killer, asan internal remedy, has no equal, 
Iq cases of Summer Complaint, Dyspepsia, Dysentcrj", 
Asthma, it cures In one night by taking it internally, and 
bathing with it freely. Its action Is like magic when ex. 
tcrnally applied to Bad Sores, Burns.lScalds, andtSprams- 
For Toothache, don't fail to try it. In short it is a Fain 
KiUer. 

The Pain Kiiler is sold by all- Druggists and dealers in 
Family Medicines. 

REOINGTON & CO., and HOSTETTER & SMITH, San 
Francisco, Cal., General Wholesale Agents. jylm 



« Suisun City, Cal., June 26, 18C9. 
Messes. Dewey & Co:— This is the third time you 
have presented ine with Letters Patent within twelve 
months. Gentlemen, you have done all I have ashed of 
you — you have been honest'; you are men that an in- 
ventor can rely upon for doing business for him, and he 
need not fear of being swindled or wronged in any way. 
I would give you business to do in your various depart, 
ments in preference to any one else. Many thanks to 
you for your success. Tou have obtained valuable pat- 
ents for me, and I appreciate your kindness, your hon- 
esty, abilitj' and success. Yours, Richard Knott. 



Gold Metal. 



THE GOLD KETAL "WATCHES 
Now being Introduced by 

C E. COLLINS &> CO., 

No. 62» TVnshlngrton. Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Surpass anything yet made in the way of an Imitation Gold 
Watch. They wear well, and keep good time. 

The Ladles' Watches cost S8 and SIO each. 
The Gentlemen's cost & t > and $20 each. 
Chains, from $3 to SC each. 

EECOJIMEXBATIONS: 

Saw Francisco, May 12, 1869. 
Tills is to certify, that I have carried one of the small size 
Gold Metal Watches which I got of-C. E Collins & Co., and 
I find that it runs as well, and keeps as good time, as any 
watch I ever carried, and I can therefore recommend 
thcin. I am engaged on the Sacramento stemner "Chrys- 
opolis." C. A. COLBY. 

I am engineer on the San Jose Bailroad. I have been 
carrying one of C. E. Collins & Co's watches for about one 
year, and I cau safely say it is the very best watch for time 
that 1 have ever seen. GEO. CORN WA LL. 

Engineer on the San Jose Railroad. 

Messrs. C. E. Collins A Co:— Ilavlngheard your watches 
spoken of in the highest manner, I have resolved to order 
one for myself. You may send mc one of the Lady's S10 
watches, without the chain. Send it as soon as possible, as 
I am very much in need of a tlme-pieco. 

R. B PATTEN, 

Toano.C. P. R. R. 

The public are cautioned against buying their watches 
at high prices, as many of them are sold tor genuine Gold 
Wntche*, at from $100 to $150 each. 

For List of Prices and Description of Goods, send directly 
to us. Can be sent by Express to be paid for on delivery. 
C. E. COM. BAN A- CO., 
No. 629 Washington street, San Francisco. 
P. S.— Whore six watches of the above are ordered at one 
time, we will send one extra, free oTall charges. 

We also deal in the tiuest Gold and Silver Watches, Watch 
Materials, etc. Send for circulars or prices. 
26vl8-4t 



To News Agents. 

From July 1st, 1869, News Agents desiring five or more 
copies weekly of the Mining and Scientific Pkess, will 
be furnished direct from the office, at a reduced price 
from former rates. Orders for a less number can best 
be supplied through San Francisco wholesale agents. 



Pacific Mail Steamship Co's 

STEAMSHIPS FUR 

NEW T0EE, JAPAN AND CHINA. 

LEAVE WHARF, CORNER OF FIRST AND 

_ Brannan streets, at 11 o'clock A. M. of the 

following dates, for PANAMA, connecting via Panama Rail- 
road, with one of the Company's splendid steamers from 
A.SPINWALL for NEW YORK. 
On the lOth, 17th and ttOth of each month that has 

30 days. 

On the 1 Oth, 38th and 30th of each month that lias 

31 days. 

When the JOih.lSth and 30th fall on Snndav, thov will 
leave on Saturday preceding; when ihc 17th lalls t ii Mui- 
dav, they will leave on I lie Monday following. 

Steamer leaving San Franch-co on the 10th touches at 
Manzanillo. All touch at Acapulco. 

Departure of the 17th or I81I1 is expected to connect with 
the trench Trans-Atlantic Co.'a stcumcr for St. Nnzatrr, 
and English steamer for South America. Througli tickets 
can be obtained. 

The following Steamships will be dispatched ondatesas 
given below : 

July 9-GOLDFN CITY Cant. Wm. F. Lapidge, 

Connecting with ALASKA, Capt. Gray. 

Julv 17— MONTANA Ci.pt E. S. Firnsworth. 

Connecting with HENRY CHAUNCEY,Capt. Connor. 

July30-COl.ORADO Capt. Wm. H. Parker, 

Connecting with ARIZONA, Capt Maury. 

Passengers berthed through. Bagcaee checkeo through. 
One hundred pounds allowed each adult. 

An experienced Surgeon on board. Medicine and attend- 
ance free. 

These steamers will positively sail at 11 o'clock. PaBstn- 
gcrs are requested to have their buggage on board before 10 
o'clock. 

Through Tickets to Liverpool by the "In man" and "Na- 
tional " Steamship Lines, can be obtained at the office of 
the P. M. S. S. Co., San Francisco, where mav also bo ob- 
tained orders for passage from Liverpool or Southampton 
to Snn Francisco, cither via New York or St. Thomas— if 
desired an amount of £10 to £20 will he advanced with the 
above orders. Holders of orders will be required to iden- 
tify themselves to the Agents in England. 

For Merchandise and Frelcht to New York and Way 
Ports, Company's Form of Bill Lading only used. 

No Freight will be received on board after 2 P. M. of the 
day prior to Ihe steamer's departure. 

The Steamship GREAT REPUBLIC, Capt. Cnvarly, will 
he dispatched lor YOKOHAMA and HoNGKONG on SAT- 
URDAY, July 3d, ISB9, at noon connecting at YOKOHAMA, 
with the steamer NEW YORK for SHANGHAI. Shippers 
of freight to China or Japan are requested to mark on each 
package Its destination. 

For passage, rreight and all other information, applv at 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Co's office, corner of Sacra- 
mento and Leidesdorff streets. 

OUVEtt ELuBTDGK, Acr«-nl. 



THE BEST WEEKLY IN AMERICA. 

M'tiOKE'S RTTRAJL NEW YORKER, 

The largest, best and cheapest Rural, Litkhaby and Fam- 
ily Weekly, in the world, enters upon a new Half Volume 
Julv 3. and hence Jfote iaihe Time to Subscribe! Stxiecn fhe- 
column paves. Employs the best talent. Finch* and pro- 
fusely illustrated. Kor example, see the splendid lull pace 
group oiGkn. Gkant's Famous Hofsks, in No. for July 3d, 
Adapted to the whole country. Combines Ability, Varietv. 
Ta-tte, Spirit, Progrt-as and Usefulness. Circulates all over 
the Continent, and now reaches ihe Pacific States in a week 
from date. Is not onlv a superior Literary and Family Paper 
htn treats lullyand ably upon Rural anil Domestic affairs, 
Science, Art, etc. Trvlt, and vou will find thai "M. 'ore's 
Rural" is (as both Press and People say), the Best Weekly 
in America. Only $3 a year— $1.M) lor half. Ask vour P. 
M., or address D. D. T. MOORE, 

lvl9 2t 41 Park Row, New York. 



gBlake's Patent. T5 E ^ BES R T r0MP e for B u ol,er 

1 reeders. Breweries, SufiAr Hiius- 
cb, Tanneries, Mining una Fire pur- 
poses, etc., is T' 




IS PUMP 



It Is 






rfa no expert to run it. and will 
stnrt at any point. Ib wnrrnntrd 
roniTitB under nil circnmBtnncee. 
Send for a circular. W. 0. M. 
BERRY & CO.. 114 California St., 
(Son Francisco, Cal. 



July 10, 1869.] 



T\\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



29 



Company 2ransactlons. 

New Incorporations. 

The following now companies have been 
incorporated : 

Eugene City (Oreoox) Water Co. — 
Articles filed at Salem. Object: to oring 
watef into Eugene City for manufacturing, 
irrigation, etc., from the head of MoVey 
Slouch, near the junction of Coast and 
Middle Forks of Willamette rivers. Capi- 
tal stock, $25,000, in shares of $250. Trus- 
tees: A. W. Patterson, N. L. Packard, A. 
B. Patterson, Win. Smith and J. Kersey. 

Harrison S. M. Co. — Sacramento, Juno 
24th. Capital stock, $1,000,000, in shares 
of 8100 each. Trustees: G. A- Oonreen, 
Cuas. E. H-ister and M. H. Kollock. Prin- 
cipal place of business, San Francisco. 

Texas M. Co. Sacramento. June 21th. 
Capital stock, 81,000,000, in shares of 
$100 each. Trustees and place of business, 
same as above. 

Meetings, Elections, Etc. 

Front Street, ML & O. R. R. Co.— July 
1st. President, N. D. Aruot; Vice Presi- 
dent, Win. Blackwood; Treasurer, Abner 
Doble; Secretary, Andrew White; Super- 
intendent, Henry Casebolt. 

Sullivan M. Co.— July 1st. Trustees: 
W. X Williams (President), H. G. Parker, 
George Parker, Ira P. Rankin and L. J. 
Lewis. O. D. Squire was appointed Sec- 
retary. 

Axhasibra M. Co. — July 8th. Trustees: 
W. Ayer (President), E. P. Swett (Treas- 
urer), Ira G. Hoitt (Secretary), A. J. Dow- 
ner and George Osgood. 

Pocahontas M. Co.— July 8th. Trus- 
tees: L. A. Booth (President), John Barton 
(Vice President), D. A. Jennings (Secre- 
tary), A. G. Stiles and Joseph Sedgeley. 
N. 1). Burlingbani, Superintendent. 



San Francisco Market Kates, 

Wholesale Prices. 

Feiday, July 9. 1869. 

Flour. Extra, "3 bbl S* 75 "3$5 50 

Dm. Superfine 4 25 @ \ 50 

Corn Mt-ni.'e* loo lbs 2 no @ 2 25 

Wheat, tjUuo lbs 1 40 @ 1 7U 

Oats, "^ 100 tt>s 1 50 ® 1 6b 

Barley, 1HUU Bis D5 @ I 25 

Bean*. %t 10u lbs 3 50 @ 5 00 

PuUitocH, $ 100 Rig 50 % i 15 

Hay. « ton 10 oo <3i7 0u 

Live Oak Wo-hI, i3 cord 9 00 @10 00 

Beef, extra, dressed, ^lb 7 @ 9 

Sheep, on fool 2 50 @ 3 00 

HOgS, oil foot, 5*tb 5 @ 7 

Hugs, dressed , c* tt> 9 @ 10 

GROCERIES, ETC. 

Sutrar, crushed, ^ tt> H>£ @ 15 

Do. China It) @ 11 

Coffee. Oofliii Klca, "ft lb 19 @ 2t) 

Do. Rio — @ 19 

Tea, Japan, $ lb 75 @ 90 

Do Green 60 @ 1 25 

Hawaiian Rice, %l lb 9% ® 10 

China Kice, @ lb 5?I @ 6>J 

Coal Oil, ft Gallon 45 @ 47$£ 

Candles. 5* lb 16 @ 18 

Ranch liiilter. ft lb 35 @ 38 

Isthmus It utter, ft n> 32^ @ — 

Cheese. California, ft lb 15 @ 17 

Eggs, ft dozen 35 @ 42« 

Lard.ftR. 13 @ 17 

Hum and Bacon, "fit lb 14 no iG 

Shoulders, ft lb e 7 @ 8 

Ketall Price*. 

Butler, California, fresh, ft lb 45 @ 50 

do. pickled, ft lb 30 @ — 

do. Oregon, ft lb 20 @ 2{ 

do. New York, ft tt> 35 @ 40 

Cheese, ft tt> 20 @ 25 

Honey, ft lb 25 @ 30 

Eggs, p dozen 50 @ 55 

Lard, ft tb 18 @ 20 

Hams anil Bacon, ^ lb 20 @ 25 

Cranberries, ft gallon 1 on @ 1 26 

Potatoes, ft lb if; @ 2 

Potatoes, Sweet, ft lb _ @ — 

Tomatoes. ft lb 6 @ 10 

Onions, ft R> 5 @ 8 

Apples, No, 1, ft lb 4 @ S 

Pears, Table, ft ft , 5 ® 7 

Hums, dried, ft ft 10 @ j 2 

Peaches, dried, ft ft 10 @ 18 

Oranges, ft dozen 50 @ 60 

Lemons, ft dozen — @ 1 IK) 

Chickens, apiece 75 @ 1 00 

Turkeys, ft lb 30 @ 35 

Soap, Kile undo. (.) 7 <a 12 

Soap, Castile. ft lb 18 @ 20 



San Prancisco Metal Market. 

PRICES FOR INVOICES. 

Jobbing prices rule from ten to fifteen per cent, higher than Ot 
folfoicinq quotation*. 

Friday, July 9, 18G9. 

Iros.— Duty: Pig, S9 per ton; Railroad, 60c %* luo lbs; Bar, 
I@1!t,c ft ft; Sheet, polished, 3c ft ft; common, l^@12it 
* lb; Plate, l&c 9 "•; Pipe, Uic ^i ft; Galvanized, 2>ic 
"i* ft. ^ 

Scotch and English Pig iron ¥*;ton 542 fO @$ 

White Pin Ifltim 36 00 @ 

Refined Bar, bad assorlmcnt t? ft _ 03 ® — *- 

Rcflned Bar, good assortment, $fl> — 1)4 @ 

Boiler, No. 1 to 4 — 04JJ® — — 

Plate, No. 5 to 9 r» — 04W 

Sheet, No. 10 to 13 — 04^@ — 5 

Sheet, No. 14 to 20 — ufi a— su 

Sheet, No. 24 to 27 —05 @— 6J4 

Cofpkr.— Dutv: Sheathing. 3ioC f. lb; Plgand Bar,2J;c ^tti 

SheuthinE, Hft @— 26 

SheathliiK, Yellow — 20 @ — 21 

Sheathing, Old Yellow — 10 © — 11 

Composition Kails — 21 @ — 22 

Composition Bolts — 21 @ — 22 

Tin Plates.— Duty: 25 pi cent, ad valorem. 

Plates, Charcoal, IX, ^ box 12 00 @ : 

Plates, I C Charcoal 10 00 @ 10 50 

Rooflnir Plfktes 10 00 @ 10 50 

Banco. Tin. Slabs,?* ft @ — 35 

Ptkkl.— English Cast Steel, ^ft @ — 15 

gOICKSILVEIt.— p. lb — 55 <a — t>0 
EAD.-PlB.^ttl - 7K@— 8 

Sheet — 10 @ 

Pipe — 11 @ 

Bar — 9 @— 9 

Zinc— Sheets, $ ft - — io>£@— 11 

Uohai.— California, i3 ft — 38 @ ~ 40 

Elrctrottpe ENGRAVl^cs, Cots, Etc.— Our Job Printing 
Oihco is abundantly supplied with elegant engravings, or. 
namcuta, and other embcHiahmouts to suit the various 
branchehof industry in this State 



The Chops. — The Tuolumne News gives 
Borne interesting facts concerning the crops 
in that county, from which it appears that 
an immense amount of grain will be har- 
vested this year on the west side of the 
San Joaquin river. In a region where not 
over 10,000 bushels of grain were ever 
raised before, there will be harvosted this 
fall from 900,000 to 1,000,000 bushels. The 
News remarks that, enormous as this yield 
will be, there can scarcely bo a doubt but 
that the lowest statement will certainly bo 
realized. As nearly all of this is from 
land for the first time put into wheat, it 
will undoubtedly moro than compensate 
for any falling off of crops in other parts 
of the State from tho effects of rust, etc. 



"How is Your Livbr?" — This is the ex 
clamation put by Lord Byron into the mouth of 
Ileppo's wife on meeting Iter billious-lookinp; lord 
after his return from captivity iiv a tropical clime. 
If tho same question was propounded to every 
American to-day, thrco out of every live thus in- 
terrogated would probably admit that the import- 
ant organ was " out of order." Why should this 
ho, when it is notorious that a course of Drake's 
Plantation Bitters will impart perfect regu- 
nrity to its action, and give it a healthy tone, as 
certainly as the moon regulates the ebb and flow 
of the sea 't Whenever the whites of the eyes be- 
tray a tinge of yellow, or there is pain in the right 
side or between tho shoulders, or a general feeling 
of lassitude, languor and depression is experi 
eneed, be sure that tho liver is affected, and com 
meiice taking this unequalled anti-bilious and 
tonic preparation. Tho billious invalid who fol- 
lows this advice will 6oon be able to meet the 
question, " How is your liver V with tho cheerful 
response, " perfectly sound." *#* 

Three Hundred large mahogany logs from 
Central America, at much lower rates than East- 
ern mahogany, at Hobbs, Gilmorc & Co's Box 
Factory, Market street, near Bealo. *#*■ 



If the type of your evening paper begins to 
look small, dim or indistinct, apply at once to C 
Midler, 205 Montgomery street, for a pair of his 
A No. 1 Spectacles. * 



Important to Assayers. 

Crucibles. 

The Patent Plumbago Crucible Co., 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

Melting Pots, Portable Furnaces, 

CRUCIBLES, and other fire-standing Goods, 
Battemeu Wvrki, London. 
THE MORGAN PATENT CRUCIBLES have uniform 
Quality, never crack, withstand the greatest heat without 
danger; heats more rapidly than any other; change of tem- 
perature hat no effect on them; stand on the average forty 
to fifty pourings. 

CERTIFICATES: 

Uuited Slates Branch Mint. Sin Francisco, Cal., March 
12, 1869— Messrs A. S. Hallidie & Co , Agents Morgan Cruci- 
ble :— I iiave carefully tested the Morpaii Patent Plumbago 
Crucibles purchased from you for the U. S B. Mini, and 
cheeriullv certify to their superiority and economy over all 
othpr Crucibles used by and under me. Thr-y are fully 
what yon represent them, and I shall continue to u.^e them 
in preference lo any other. J. .Vl . EOKFELUT, 

Metier and Refiner, U S. B. Mint. 

Eagle Brass Found rv. 2UI3 Fremont street, San Francisco 
12th March, 1869— Messrs. A. S Hallidie & Co.. 519 front 
street— Oeiiiiemen: — Wo have used and tested the Morgan 
Patent Plumbago Crucible, for which you are ngents, nnd 
pronounce rherii superior to and cheaper than anv Crucible 
used by us heretoiorc. GKEENBERG & MOORE. 

Messrs. A S. Hallidie & Co :— Wr> have thoroughly and 
severely tested in every way the Morgan Patent Plumbago 
Crucible obtained by us Troin you, and find them, superior 
to any wc have yet tried, although we have used every not 
obtainable in this market, we have none equal to the 
above, and concede your claims for them. We think they 
will average 45 pourings of bruss. 

GALLAGHER, WEED' A CO,, 
California Brass Wurks, lib Front street, £an Francisco. 

Assav Olfice of H. Harris, Silver City, Nevada, April 2-1, 
1S69- Messrs A. S H.ilidie .fe Cn.—Genis:-I received from 
you three Crucibles of tiie Morgan make, which I have 
used since tbclrarnval, and tested by constant u<o. Since 
1847, when In the New Orleans Mint. I have always pre- 
ferred the Crucible of Dixo"'s make over Adus, Gauiier, 
and Taunton, Mass. Yours I find to be not alone of more 
finished make, iiut to stand double or treble the work of 
Dixon's Crucibles. The No. 12 -the smnilcst sent— has 
stood so far 3i meltings, and is as good and sound as when 
rect ived. Your CrucTules do not scale off like others; and 
as they are forty percent, cheaper, 1 do not si-e why ihey 
shoal" not be preferred by all assayers on account of dura- 
bility and cheapness. Yours respectfully, U. HARRIS. 

On hand and for sale by the Agents, 

A. S. HALLIDIE A- CO., 

18vl8-9p G1W Front street, San Francisco 



R. G. ROWLEY, 

ATTORNEY A\'» COU\SELOtt AT LAW, 

CIS Merchant street, 
Between Montgomery and Kearny. 
Francisco. 



Box 2102, San 
lvlBlf 



New Mining Advertisements, 



George Washington Silver Mining: Company. 

White Pine District. Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the first day of 
July, 1869, an assessment of ten cents per share (or $1 
per foot), was levied upon the capital stock of said Com- 
pany, payaaule on ihe tenth day of July, 1869, in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the Com- 
pany, No. 10 Stevenson building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stocit uoon wtucn said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the tw ll'lh day of August, 1869, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be dulv advertised for saleatpubllc 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will 
be sold on Thursday, the twenty -sixth day of August, 186 . 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together wilh cost of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

Tims. J. OWENS, Secretary. 

Office, Stevenson Building. San Francisco. jylO 



North Scar Gold Mlnln* Company— Localloo 

of Works: Grass Valley, Nevada County. Calllornla. 

Notici.— There are delinquent up<.<n tho following described 
■tock, on account of assessment levied on tho fourth 
day of June, 1369. tho several amounts set opposlto the 
u:inn - of the respective share holders, as follows: 

Names. No. Certlflcate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Win II V CronUe, Trustee i I B 80 vo 

C F Fargo ft 87 1740 00 

Thoniai Hope fl t7 1740 UO 

Ju H CroMou 8 i ai oo 

PG Partridge 10 57 7*0 00 

\V E I'- »n 11 1 211 0U 

A E Hill, Trustee 10 SO 400 00 

E N Torrey 25 100 00 

Geo W h.aver 2.1 29 680 00 

AK HIM, Trustee 29 13 3W> 00 

P Q Partridge 31 1 2-00 

Samuel P Holden ....55 & 100 00 

Ktimui'l P Hidden 36 100 00 

Vlolettft Clement S9 lo aoo oo 

Benjamin Brady i ..< ]u jon oo 

Benjamin Wright 44 5 100 00 

Thus J Poulterer. 45 60 100.1 00 

A E Hill, Trustoo 47 16 SCO 00 

A E Hill, Tr us Ilii 62 JO 200 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 67 10 2ii0 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 58 10 20J &» 

H E Hill, Trustee 69 10 200 00 

A E Hill. Tru-tec 64 65 ISuO 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 65 75 Jfioo 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 09 10 2iKJ 00 

W L Torrey 71 ft ioo a> 

A K Hill, Trustee 73 6 100 00 

A E Hill. Trustee 76 2 41) 00 

A II Hill, Trustee 82 ft) 1800 00 

A E Hill. Trustee 85 6 lft-) 00 

A E Hill. Trustee 88 6 Nfl 00 

L Kuhn, Trustee H8 6 100 00 

L Kuhu, Trustee 89 6 ID) no 

A E Hill, Trustee. 99 25 600 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 100 23 600 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 101 25 600 l0 

Tics J PouPercr 102 lu »W ou 

A E Hill, Trustee 103 IS 3IW 00 

A E H'll, Trustee 104 6 100 00 

A E Hill, trustee 1U5 5 10U 00 

ET Pease 106 10 2> 00 

El Peso 107 10 200 00 

K J -T£ ,,US,! 103 10 2C0 00 

ET Pease \m ] 200)0 

E T Pease no 10 2<H) 00 

ET Pease m )y 200 00 

SJS? Me U* 15 SM 00 

11T iIi-mim 117 W lOuO LO 

M Betiinan ug 6 100 w 

A E HIM, Trustee 120 32 640 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 123 fl 100 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 125 10 200 00 

»' m B AlftSMi W 5 10000 

McDonald & Whitney, Tros...l29 8 60 00 

E T Fonso ....130 13 300 CO 

<■ hares Stevens.... 131 10 2ini 00 

Charles Sievens 133 8 100 00 

( /'V ,rl ^S! evcn9 1H3 1» 20000 

John WTltcomb 134 jo 200 00 

Thos J Poulterer 1.10 -,<) 1000 00 

John WTltcomb 138 10 200 00 

AElIdl, Trusteo 139 lo 20H 00 

Geo W Beaver U3 51 1000 00 

9 £?T r 8°,"V"™ Ui 1° «W W 

A H Llssnk, Jr., Trustee 146 6 100 i0 

Geortte A Kaymond 147 8 100 0) 

A H Llssak, Jr., Trustee 148 5 KM) 00 

A K P Harmon, Trustee I<9 l 20 00 

W B Bourn, Trustee IfO 750 16000 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 163 74 1480 00 

A E Hill, Trusteo 155 20 400 0i) 

A E Hill, Trustee.., 137 6 120 00 

AE Hill. T usteo |fg 500 10000 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 169 30 600 00 

A E Mill, Trustee 160 100 2000 0.1 

AE Hill, Trustee 161 10 200 00 

A E Hill, Trusteo 162 130 26110 00 

A E Hill, Trusteo 164 66 1120 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 165 23 460 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 1C6 16 320 00 

AE Hill. Trustee 167 3 60 00 

FA Hasaey 168 8 100 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the fourth day of June, 1869, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary will be sold at public auction, at the offlco of 
tho Company, Room 10 at No 402 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, on Friday, the thirtieth day of July, 1869, at the 
hour of 2 o'clock P. M. of said day, to pay said delin- 
quent assessment thereon, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of Bale. 

T. W. COLBURN, Secretary. 

Office, room No. 10 second floor of No. 402 Montgomery 
street, San Francisco. )yl0 

Thunderbolt Mill and Mining; Coniuany, White 

Pine District, Nevada- 
Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the first day of July, 
18C9, an assessment of five cents per share (or $1 per foot), 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able on the tenlh day of July, 1869, lu United States gold 
coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the Company, No. 10 
Stevenson Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the twelfth day of August, 1869, shall he 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment shall be made be- 
fore, will be sold on Thursday, the twenty-sixth dav of 
August, 1869, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with conts ot advertising and expenses of sale. By order 
of the Board of Trustees. 

THOS. J. OWENS. Secretary. 
Office, Stevenson Building, San Francisco, Cal. jylO 



Toscmlte Mining Company, Hamboldt County, 

Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held *^n the second day of 
July. 1869, an assessment of fifty (50) cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Companj-, payable 
immediately, in United States gold and silver coin, to the 
Secretary, San Francisco. 

Any stuck uoon which said assessment shall remnln un- 
paid on the seventh day of August. 18G9, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will bo duly advertised Tor sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will 
be sold on Tuesday, the twenty -fourth dav of August, 
1869. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with 
costs of ad vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the 
Board of Trustees. 

It. H. CROWE. Secretary pro tern. 

Office, No. 220 Clay street, San Francisco. jylO 



Mining Notices— Continued. 



Sanlel *Wcb<tter Silver Mining; Company.— Lo- 
cation of Works: White Fine DisO-ict, Nevada. 
Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of tho Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the thirtieth day of 
June, 1869, an assessment of fifteen cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Companv, payahle 
immediately, in United States gold colu, to the Secretary, 
at his office. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the thirtieth <30tM day of July, 1869. shall be 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment shall be made before, 
will be sold on Thursday, tho nineteenth day of August, 1869, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad 
vertising and expenses of sale, hy order of the Board of 
Trustees . 

O. D. SQUIRE, Secretary. 
Office, 413 California street, San Francisco, Cal. jy'J 



Engraved to Order.— Persons who desire to illustrate 
their Individual establishments or business, should give us 
their orders for Engraving and Printing, and we will guar- 
antee good work and reasonable prices. 

DEWE* 4 CO., 

Patent Agents, Publishers and Job Printers, Hi Clay at. 



Evenlnx Star, \o, 1, Silver Mining Company 
Location of Works: White Pine LMslrlct, White Pine 
Ooonty, S-ate of Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, thatat a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of anld Company, held on the twenty-fifth day 
of June, 1809, an assessment of ten cents per share was 
levied npon the capital stock of said Companv, payable 
Immediately, in United Slates gold coin, lo Ihe Secretary, 

at the office 01 the Company. No. 309 Montgomery street, 

San Vninel-L-u. t'al. 

Any Block upnn which said assessment shnll remain 
unpaid on Saturday, the ihirty-tlrsl day of Julv, 1S69, 
shall be deemed delinquent, and will be dulv advertised 
forsale at public auction, and unless payment shall bo 
made before, will be wold on Saturday, the twenty-first day 
of August. 1869, lo pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with Cfsts of advertising and expenses ot sale. By order 
of the Board ol Trustees. 

WM. II. WATSON, Secretary. 

Offic--, Room No. 6, No. 302 Montgomery street, San Fnin- 
cbico. Cal. jc2& 

Gold Mill Tunneling; Cold and Silver Mining; 

Company.— Location: Gold mil, Btorey County > Btate of 

Nevada. 

The Fifth Anneal Meeting of the Stockholders or the 
above named Company, for the election oi Trustees to 
serve for the ensuing year, will be held on SATURDAY, 
the seventeenth day of July, 1869, at 3>£ o'clock P. M., at 
their office, 414 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

B. WEOENER, Secretary. 

Office, 414 Callfornlastrect, San Francisco* jel9 

I, X. I.. Gold nnd Sliver Mlnlnn Compuny,— IjO* 

cation of Mine: Silver Mountain District, Alpine Coun- 
ty, Cat. 

Noticb.— There ore delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
tenth day of May, 1869, the several amounts set oppo- 
site the names of the respective shareholders as follows: 
Names. No. Certificate, No. shares. Aiimunt. 

Evnni, Gnmer MS5 90 $1.16 OO 

Bridges. Mary C. 360 12^ 18 15 

Senior, Riley 55 10 15 ttl 

Clark, T B 375 10 15 00 

(lark, TB 3. a 6 2M 33 75 

Lone:. E U 354 10 15 00 

Phillip*. ChasC 60 I4X 6 65 

Vega. Fdela 151 11 16 50 

Jardln. Henry 188 5 7 50 

Jardin, Henrv 304 3 4 50 

Jardln, Henry 330 12% 18 7fi 

Jardin, Henry 331 6 7 60 

Jardln. Henrv 334 15 22 50 

Hepburn, James 116 5 7 50 

Hepburn, James 153 5 7 60 

Hepburn, James 217 10 15 00 

Miinding. Louis 237 28 4J CO 

Cairns. John 249 70 105 00 

Bolts.John 2.-.6 8 12 00 

Bolts. John 381 111 15 CO 

Hatch. F S 312 8 12 00 

Love, R K 275 6 7 50 

Love, R K 332 5 7 50 

Cutter, RS SISri 3}£ 5 25 

Cutter, RS 384 10 15 00 

Long. M 385 22 7-16 33 60 

Really, ED 3fc9 10 15 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of tho Board 
of Trustees, made on the tenth ilOth) day of May, 
1869, so many shares of each parcel ol said stock as may 
be necessary, will be sold at public auction, by Messrs. 
Olney A Co., auctioneers, No. 426 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, on Wednesday, the fourtccenth day of July, 
1869, at the hour of 12 o'clock, M., of said day, to pay said 
delinquent; assessment thereon, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

J. CROWNINSH1ELD, Secretary. 
Office, Pioneer Hall, Montgomery street, up stairs, San 
Francisco. fy6 

Notice.— The Annual Meeting of Stockholders 

of the " Kewaneo Silver Mining Company," for Hie elec- 
tion of Trustees and the transaction of any other Important 
business, will be held at the office of the Company, No. 211 
California street, on SATURDAY, July 10th, 1869, at 3 
o'clock P. M. 

EDWARD BARRY, Secretary. 
June 10th, 1869. jel2 

San Fernando Tunnel und Silver Mining Com- 
pany, White Pine Mining District, State of Nevada. 
Notick.— The first Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of 
the San Fernando Tunnel and Silver Mining Company will 
be held at the office of the Company, on MONDAY, the 
second day of August, 1869, at 3 o'clock P. M., fr the pur- 
pose of electing Trustees to serve for the ensuing year, and 
for the transaction of any other business that may prop- 
erly come before the meeting. 

GEORGE L. SMITH, Secretary. 
Office, No. 16 Stevenson Building, corner Montgomery and 
California streets. 
Sun Francisco, July 1, 1869. Jy3 

Scdgley Tnnnel and Silver Mining Company* 

White Pine Mining District, Slate of Nevada. 

The first Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of the 
Stockholders of the Sedgley Tunnel and Silver Mining 
Company, will be held at the office of the Company, on 
MONDAY, the second day of August, 1369, at 1 o'clock P. 
M., for the purpose of electing Trustees to serve for the en - 
sum:: year, and tor the transaction of any other business 
that may properly come before Hie meeting. 

GEORGE L. SMITH, Secretary. 

Office, No. 16 Stevenson Building, corner of Montgomery 
and California street?, 

San Francisco, July 1, 1869. jy3 



White Cloud Tunnel and Silver Mining Com- 

pnny, White Pino Mining District, State of Nevada. 

NoncB.— The first Annual Meeting of Stockholders of 
the White Cloud Tunnel and Sil-er Mining Company, will 
be hold at the office of the Company, on MONDAY, the 
second dav of Vitgmt, 1869, at 2 oMuck P M. for the pur- 
pose of eli-c \ a ivustces to serve for the ensuing year, and 
for the tr 11- if : n of any other business that may properly 
comebelure the meeting. - 

GEORGE L. SMITH, Secretary. 

Office, No. 16 Stevenson Building, corner of Montgomery 
and California streetB. 

San Francisco, July 1, 1869. JyS 

IVllllmnntlc Silver Mining Company. location 

of works: White Pine District, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on tho twentieth day 
of May, 1869, an assessment of twenty cents per share waa 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secre- 
tary, at his office, 413 California street, San Francisco. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the nineteenth day of July, 1869, shall be 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment shall be made before, 
will be sold on Tuesday, the teuth dav of August, 1869, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

O. D. SQUIRE, Secretary. 

Office, 418 California Street. San Francisco. je2li 



Patent Ofkicb Rkpoiits, from 1843 to I847, Mechanical, 
are wanted for duplicate copies ai .bis office. Parties have 
ing them fur sale will plcasn state price, and aJdrcss 
DEWEY & CO., Mining and Scientific Press office. Saa 
Francisco- 



30 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 10, 1869. 



Metals— What are They? 

[Written tor the Alining and Scientific i'ress.1 
BY E. PIQUE. 

Editoks Pkess : — In your issue of March 
27th, you extract the following remarks 
from the Mechanics' Magazine: 

"We have no general definition of a 
metal, to show us what constitutes any sub- 
stance, metallic or non-metallic. This is 
very odd, as metals are considered to form 
such a distinct class from other substances. 
Still the most learned in chemistry are not 
agreed as to what substances are metals, 
etc. There apparently is no property yet 
discovered that is common to the whole list 
of fifty-two metals. The word metal, ap- 
parently, is just a name without any dis- 
tinctive properties attached to it. " 

There seems to be truth in the above re- 
marks. Some of the older chemical works 
give the following distinguishing proper- 
ties: 

Metals are elementary bodies, that 

1. Possess a certain luster (metallic 
luster J. There are a good many other bod- 
ies that show the same; but they are mostly 
compounds, and not elements. The metals 
do not show that luster if precipitated in a 
finely divided state from a very diluted so- 
lution, but they receive it again by friction 
with a hard body. 

2. They are not transparent (opaque), 
and are not soluble in water. Both of tbese 
properties are shared by some not metallic 
substances; therefore, they do not afford 
any distinguishing mark. 

3. Metals in a solid state are good con- 
ductors of electricity and of heal, while the 
non-metallic elements are insulators of elec- 
tricity and bad conductors of heat. Only 
this last property has been retained by the 
new works of chemistry as a distinction. 

It is generally agreed that out of the 
whole series of elementary substances there 
are thirteen that are not metals (oxygen, 
sulphur, selenium, chlorine, bromine, 
iodine, thorine, hydrogen, nitrogen, phos- 
phorus, silicon, borax, and carbon) . All of 
these (with the exception of carbon, whioh, 
when properly prepared, is a good con- 
ductor of electricity) are, in fact, insu- 
lators—or non-conductors of electricity — 
and this is sufficient to distinguish them 
from the metals. This holds good only at 
ordinary temperature, since the gases at a 
high temperature will conduct electricity, 
and so will many of the solid insulating 
substances, when in a molten state. I 
would therefore propose the following defi- 
nition : Metals are elementary substances, 
which, at ordinary temperature are good con- 
ductors of electricity, providing their parti- 
cles are sufficiently condensed. 



Machinists and Foundries. 



PALMER, KNOX & CO., 

Golden State Iron Works, 

Nor. 10, SI, S3 and S5 First Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

M-ANDFACTCRE ALL KINDS Or 

MACHINERY, 

STEAM ENGINES ANB QXTA-KTZ MTt/LS 

DUNBAR'S IMPROVED 

"Self-A-tfjusting Piston jPaejkAng, 

Requires no springs or screws; is always steam tight; 

without excessive friction, and never 

gets slack or leaky. 

WHEELER & RANDALL'S 

SEW GBINSEK JLNU AMAICAMATOB 

HEPBURN & PKTERSON'S 

AMAL&AM1TOB ANI> SEPARATOR, 

Knot's Amulffamators, 

WITH PALMER'S PATENT STEAM CHEST, 

uperior for working either GOLD OR SILVER ORES, and 
s the only Amalgam si tor that has stood the test ot seven 
pears' continual working. 
Uenulne "White Iron Stamp Shoe** and Bleu 

Having been engaged for the past ten years in quarts 
mining and being conversant with all the improvements, 
either in Mining or Milling, we are prepared to furnish, at 
ihe shortest notice, the most perfect machinery for radue- 
ng ores, or saving either gold or silver. LSvlUqy-tf 



IRA P. RANKIN. 



A. P, BRAYTOS. 



A. C. AUSTIN. 



Pacific Iron Works. 

First a.n.4 Fremont Streets, 

SAN FEASCISCO. 

Bavins been established since 1851, we have accumulated 
a very large variety of Gear and other fatleriu. which, 
with our superior tools and appliances, give us tacllities for 
doing first class wort uuequaled on the Factflc Coast. 

Among other things, we manufacture the following: 

steam: engines, 

Horizontal and Vertical, for either Stationary or Marine 

use. 

BOILERS— High, and Low Pressure, 

Pump, Pipe and sheet Iron Work of every kind. 

Quartz Mill Work, 

Including High and Low Mortars, for wet or dry crushing- 
Furnace Irons lor Roasilng Ores; Freiberg Barrels; 
Varuey's and wtieeler's Amalgamating Fans 
and Settlers; Stamp Shoes and Dies of 
best White Iron; Russia Iron 
Screens, etc., etc. 
Flour Mill, Saw Mill and Sugar Mill Work in every variety; 
Pumping and Hoisting Machinery ; liansbrow's 
Patent Challenge Pump, for Domestic, 
Ship and Mining use— the most 
approved and successful 
Pump manufactured. 

Castings or every description, Iron and Brass. 



We would call especial attention to " Wright's Patent Va- 
riable Cut-off Engines," of which we are the sole manufac- 
turers on the facihe Coast, under license Irorn the Wood- 
ruff £ Beach Co., Harttord, Ct. As a simple, eUective, fubl 
siViNO, nrst-cUss Engine, this is, without doubt, the best 
Engine made in the United States. 

orders promptly attended to. Prices as low as possible 
for nrst-claiawork.andwelntend^aU^o^er.^ ^ 

Sah Francisco, May 1, 186S. " 18vl6tf 



Oue Industrial Possibilities. — "We 
shall yet make our own crockery and finer 
kinds x>f pottery, which we still mainly 
import, and shall grow as well as manufac- 
ture the silks for which we are still mainly 
indebted to the insects of China and the 
looms of France, we having in California a 
more genial climate for the silk-worm than 
Europe or Asia can boast; while we are 
already reeling and spinning, on American 
machinery invented for the purpose, vast 
quantities of raw silk imported in an im- 
perfect or damaged condition (answering 
to the 'swingle-tow' of flax) which all the 
ingenuity and patient industry of 'the 
Flowery Land' had given up as hopelessly 
intractable and worthless. So shall we 
continue, under a beneficent policy of en- 
couragement and support, to develop new 
and larger possibilities of industrial 
achievements, and in expanding and di- 
versifying our own national industry, be- 
nignantly stimulate and ultimately renovate 
that of all mankind." — Horace Greeley. 

The Cincinnati Gas Explosion. — The 
engineer of the gas company writes in full 
of this occurrence, — before spoken of in 
the Pp.ESS,-^giving the facts and his expla- 
nation. The painter at work upon the 
crown of the gas-holder, who did not leave 
with the others at the dinner-hour, lighted 
his pipe and threw down the match. The 
gas that leaked from the crown, mixed with 
the air directly above it, and made an ex- 
plosive mixture, which was ignited by the 
match. The pipe was found directly after 
the occurrence, still containing fire and 
hot ashes. 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY. 

No. 135 First street, opposite Minna, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

All kinds of Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt Metal 
Castings, Brass Ship Work ot" all kinds. Spites, Sheathing 
Nails Rudder Hraces, Hinges, Ship and Steamboat Bellsand 
Gongs of superior tone. All kinds of Cocks and Valves, Hy- 
draulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and Connex- 
ions of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dispatch. 
b@- PRICES MODERATE. -fflff 



3. P. GALLAGHER. 



J. H. WEED 
9vlS.ly 



V. KINGWELU 



BENJAMIN" ELLIOT, 

No. 4=83 Brannan street San Francisco, 

Manufactures Foundry Facings constantly, from choice 
coals. Bituminous, packed in tight sucks. Anthracite and 
Charcoal ground together or separate, packed in whole 
or halt barrels Black Lead, Coke and Soapstone ground to 
order. Foundry men located far from choice material, can 
rely on having superior Facings forwarded to order. 
luvlSqr 




JAMES MACKEN, 
coppEissariTH., 

236 Fremont st.« bet. Howard <Ss Folson. 

AllklndsofCOFPER WORK done to order in the best 
manner. Particular attention paid to Steamboat, Sugar 
House and Distillery work. 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 
EUREKA 3FOTJ]Vr>ItY, 



LIGHT AS O HEAVY r.lSTlXBS, 

of every description, manufactured 24vl6qr 



CITY IRON WORKS COMPANY. 

CLERC & CO., 
I K. O HV FOUNDERS, 

Steam Engine Bnllders, aid Makers of all 
kinds of Machinery. 

6vll6qr No. 28 Fremont street, San Francisco. 



QTJAKTZ MII.I.S. 

SA1V MIL1S. 
POWDER MILLS 



Miners' Foundry 

— A5D— 

M A. O H I N E WOBK8 

Nos. 245 to 255 Eerst Stbeet, 

San Francisco. 

HOWLAND, ANGELL & CO., 

PKOPEIETOKS, 

Manufacturers of Machinery for 

FLOUR MILLS, 
Sl'GAB MILLS, 
PAPEB MILLS 

Steam Engines of all Kinds, 
Amalgamators of all Kinds. 

MINING PUMPS, HOISTING WORKS, 

OIL WILL TOOLS, BOCK BIEAKEBs, 

—AND — 

Machinery and Castings of all kinds, either 
of Iron or Brass. 

Boilers and Sheet Iron Work in all its 
Branches. 

Shoes and Dies of White Iron, manufactured 
for aud Imported by us expressly for this par. 
pose, and will Inst 3S per eent. longer than any 
other made on this count. 

Russia Iron Screens, of any defrree of fineness, 
we are the only manufacturers on this coast ot 

HICES ENGINE, 
The most compact, simple In construction, and 

durable, of auy .Engine In use. 
W.H.BOWU9I, H. B. ANGELL, 

lSvU-qr CTTBUS PALMER. 



FULTON 

Foundry and Iron Works. 

HINCKLEY & CO., 

MANUFACTUIM--RS Ot 

STEAM ENGINES, 
Quartz. Floixr and Sa.Tr Mills, 

Hayeft* Improved Steam Pump, "Brodle'a Im- 
proved Crusher, Miulntr 1'nnipn, 
Amalca.mn.tor «, and all kindu 
of Mathiuery. 

N. E. comer of Tehama and Fremont streets, above How. 
ard street,. San Francisco. 3-qy 



McAfee, spiers & co., 

IiOILEB MAKERS 

AND GENERAL MACHINISTS, 

Howard st, between Fremont and Bealc, San Francisco. 

Flue or Tubular Boilers, wMh plain circular or spiral 
courses. Upright Flue or Tubular Boilers, Locomotive and 
and Marine Boilers, and Wrought Iron Tanks of every de- 
serlptfon, 

Hydranllc Pipe supplied at reasonable rntcs. In or- 
dering. Rive the quantity of water to be supn'ied, hightof 
the fall, and total length of pipe, so as to enable thetirm to 
determine the diameter of the pipe and thicknessuf iron to 
be used. 

Ke pairs.— Boilers, Smoke Stacks, Pipes, etc., put in re- 
pair with promptness. 

To Boiler Makers aad Maclilnlnts In the In- 
terior.— The Arm is prepared to furnish estimates of 
Boilers, surply new Meads, drilled and punched, and attend 
to the selection and forwarding of Iron fur Boilers, Pipes 
and other purposes. m , 

Plans, Brawlnff* and Specifications.— The firm 
js prepared to make out Plans and Specifications, lecelve 
estimates, and superintend the Erection of any Machinery 
that may be entrusted to their care 

To Inventors.— The Arm is prepared to assist In de- 
veloping the plans of those who have the Ideas but not the 
practical experience necessary to put tlie same in furm, by 
making Drawings ot their Inventions, giving them the ben- 
efit of their practi;sl knowledge in the construction of Ma. 
chine ry, and attending to the manufacture and introduc- 
tion of their inventions. Ivl6tf 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

gacraniento. 
WILLIAMS, ROOT & NEILSON, 

MANUFACTUBKRS Of 

STEAM ENGrXlVIES, BOILEKS, 

CROSS' PATENT BOILER FERRER AND (SEDIMENT 
COLLECTOR, 

And all kinds of Mining? machinery. 

Also, Hay and Wine Presses made and repaired 
with neatness, durability and dispatch. 

Dunbar's Patent Self-Ad.lustlna: Steam Piston 



Front Street, between X and O streets, 

14vll Sacrajikkto Citt 



G. T. PRACY. 

MACHINE WORKS, 

NOS. 109 and 111 MISSION STREET, 
Between Main and Spear. 

New and Second-hand 

Engines and Boilers, 

FOK SALE. 

Also one first-class Boistlug 

Engine ; one UDright 

Engine, oi entirely 

new pattern. 

MANUFACTURER OF 

ILatlies, Drills, 

And MILL MACHINERY of 
every description. 

PBACY'S 

New and Improved 
STEAM ISCIX1! 

REGULATORS, 

The best and cheapest yet In- 
vented— manufactured and 
for sale. Parties are in- 
vited to examine it 
in practical op- 
eration. 

P. A. HUNTINGTON'S 

Shingle Machines 

on hand. 

Particular attention paid to 
Repairing. 

~3sj~ All work guaranteed to be done in a Jlrst-class man- 
ner, and at the lowest rates. 12vl7lt 




HUGH B. UHORI. 



WM. CALDWELL. 



Cyclops Engine and Machine Works, 

Construct and Repair every description of 
Stationary -and Marine Kntclnes, Mill and Min- 
ing Machinery. 

Special attention given to Repairing Machinery. 
a.pl7-3m 113 Eeale street, near Mission, S. F. 



Phoenix Iron Works. 




JONATHAN KITTEEDGE, Proprietor, 

Son. 18 and SO Fremont street, near Market, 
San Francisco. 

MANUFACTURER OT 

Fire- Proof Doors and Shutters, 

Wrought Iron Girders, and all kinds of Housesmilh work. 
Bridge, Prison 

FOiccnrxG axd machine ivokk, 

IMPROVED FIRE-PROOF SAFES, 

FIE.E AMD BUEGLAE-PKOOr SAFES, 

Of a superior make. manufacturer of the celebrated 

MONITOR SAFE. 
BANK VAULTS AND SAFES, 

Of every description, made to order at abort notice. A 

large slock of SAFES of all kinds constantly on hand. 
Agency for the ISHAM KEY REGISTER BANK AND SAFB 
LOCK, the only first class Lock in the 
lvUtf United States 



the kisx>o;lv 
Iron and Locomotive Works. 

Incorporated, April 30, 1S68. Capital, $1,000,000. 

Location of Works, Corner Beale and Hovi ard streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Successors to Pacific -Mail R. S. Co. Works at Benlcia, Coffey 

&, Risdon, and Devoe, Dinsmore A Co., sau Francisco. 

Steam Engine Builders, Boiler Makers, 

MACHINISTS AND FODNDRYMEN. 
All work iu their line attended to with promptness and 
dispatch. 

Directors: 
S. F. Butterworth, Chan. E. JTcLane, 

Lloyd Tcvls, John N. Risdon, 

Jas. Pollock, Jooeph ilooie. 

tten. tlolladay, 

JOHN N. RTSDON, President 
Joseph Moore, Vice President ancl Superintendent; Chas. 
E. McLane, '.treasurer; Lewis R. Meau .Secretary; Lewis 
Coffey, Superintendent Boiler Works. 24vl7-qy 



PACIFIC FILE WOBKS, 



Vo. 53 Beale Street, bet. Market and Mission, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Files Re-cut and warranted as good as new, with n saving 
of fifty per cent. REAPER AND flIUWER SECTIONS 
MADK TO ORDER. The only establishment on the Coast. 
Orders from the country promptly iitlfndud to. a®" First 
Premium awarded at '•in Stat« Fnlr,18li7 

2vl7-1m X. G. JDURNItfO * Cit 



GLASGOW 
Iron and Metal Importing Company 

Nos. 35 and. £7 Fremont street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Keep constantly on hand a large stock of best Bar and 
Bundle Iron, Boiler Tubes, J'late and Sheet Iron, Gas and 
Water Pipe, Anvils, Cast Steel, Gas and Water FitllD?", 
which thov offer to the trade on llheral terms. 

21vlfi-Sm W. McCRINDLE. Manage. 



Removal. 



NELSON & DOBLE, 

AGENTS FOR 

Thomas Firth & Sons 1 Cast Steel, Files, 

Etc., Shear, Spring, German, Plow, Blister and Toe Calk 

Steel; manufacturers of 

Mill Picks, Sledges, Hammers, Picks, 

Stone Cutters', Blacksmiths' and Horse-Shoers 1 Tools, 

Have removed to IS and 15 Fremont street, near 

Market, San Kranciaco. 

lOvlJqr 



CALIFORNIA TOOL WORKS, 

Blacksmith and Machine Shop, 

143 Beule St., bet. MIhdIod and Howard, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

All kinds of Edge or oilier Tools made to order. Par- 
ticular attention paid to pu ting in order aGKIUi L'l URAL 
MACMINEHV. Job Griuding and Follshing by a team. 
Orders Irom ihe Country piumpily attenOtii to. $Qr All 
work, warranted. 

21vl7qy <f. WEICHHART, Proprietor. 



By Mail.— The Jfti'iw.v ""</ Scientific Pre** will be sent by 
mail to any pari of the civilized world. In case of removal 
subscribers liave only lo inform us ot the post ultieea. dreea 
of ihe old and pew location, and the pape- will be sent 
accordingly 



July 10, 1809.] 



Tlc\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



31 



Machinery. 



VA-XllVlilY'tBi 

PATENT AMALGAMATOB 

Tlirm' .Ma< liin* - -liiml llimulnl, 
for rapidly pulverizing nn<l amalgamating ores, they 

bftve no equal. Noeffbrl tiu been, or win in-, ■pared te 

,i eoutrucud in t li«_* most perfect manner, and of 

inc nrt-*i number now In operation, not one haieverre- 

quired repair*. The constant and increasing demand tor 
them laatiiflclcni evidence "i tbelr merits, 

Thry ere conitrosted •■• u to apply steam directly Into 
1 1o pulp, or with steam bottoms, as desired. 

This Amalgamator Oper&tea u Follows: 

The pan t>elng filled* tin- motion of themuller forces the 
pulp to thu center, where It U drawn down thrum: h the ap- 
erture ami between Hie grinding nuriaccs. Thence It is 

thrown to the periphery Into Lbs quicksilver. The curved 

nlales again draw It tu the center, where 11 pauses down, 
a.n l in i lie 'ireumference as before. Thus It Is coiistuntly 

rsettng in a regular flow between the grinding Mirfaooaana 
dt i tin' gnlekslWeTi utuii the ore i* reduced to an uuimi|ja- 
ulu [u.v.a.T, and the metal amalgamated. 

-i< t<<Ts in-ide on thu Hume principle excel all others.— 
Tii' y brlnnhe pulp ■>•> o.nstatitly and perlVclly In contact 
with quicksilver, that the particles are rapidly and com 
Dtetety absorbed, 

Mtll'iiK'u are tuvll<"l to examine these pans and seller! for 
fiemsclvea, at the .'iiice. *»w Premont street, 

lvt Sun Francisco. 



CKOSS' COMBINED 

Heater & Sediment Collector 




This Healer eftVcluallv prevents the collection and depo- 
sition ot iiiairaeM In the Dollar from Impure water. From 
April I, UMt),the It -vnUv on this Heater liu* hcun 
it Kill « • r:i> 46 PKU CENT.. 
Which enables the Vulcan Iron Works, McAfee, Spiers 4 
Oo., It I til i) n lr<m Works, Of Sin PnWOlUOi Keep A Harglnn, 
oi iltockion, and Williams A O0..0I rlncramomo, the parlies 
having the rklii to build them, to furnish these Ueaiers at 
greuily reduced rates, bend for Circulars to 

16vl8-3m 



Important to every one using Steam for 
any purpose. 

Patent Steam Snpeiiieater 




(SECTIONAL KN1J vn.'.v OF B0IL1 it, WITH ST :'i-.l(.ll - .'.T -ill. 1 

Suv.-i Fuel! Save* Water! Save* Presaure! 

Brief Extracts from letters from parties using Oarvallio's 
Superheater. Full letters can be seen on applic itlon: 
Navy Ysitn. Washington, June IS, 18*1. 
"Superheater sives 12 per cent, iu fuel and 10 per cent 
more In speed of engine." 

Navy Yaiid, Washington, Oct. 8, 18C7 (after ten™ years of 
service.) 

"S'tpemcater yet attached to boilers, and appears to be 
In (food order." 

How a i;n Watch and Clock Co.. Boston, May 19, 181G. 
"Superheater save* m at least IU per coiit. in fuel and 
gives a l.irge lucre ise ot power." 

J ox as A SitiTii. New York, March 21, 18G7, 
" Superheater saves tf) per cent, of coal, less steam press- 
ure, exhaust more serviceable in drvinz paper " 

Stkau Kscivb Works, South Brooklyn, April 23, 1867. 
"Superheater saves not less than 20 per cent, fuel; no 
priming l" 

Uroccrtt Lkatiikr Cloth Co., Newark, N. J., Oct 16, '67. 

*• Superheater economizes 2fl per cent fuel; does our 
work with 25 lb«. less pressure steam, and steam superior 
for drying purposes." 

N. Y. Uvk'SG & Priming Estad., Oct 4, 1867. 

" Superheater brings contents of our dvc vats to boiling 
point in one-third Ions time and one-third less increase of 
water; saves u* at least 15 per ceni. fuel." 
Cii-NTi-iuoui Uil Refining Co., Binghampton, N. Y., Sept. 

2d, 1867. 

"superheaters give entire satUf.tctlon, and we super- 
heat to 55- deg— an Increase of aoj dot." 

CAKittv MUnii'. C i , So. Hartley Falls, Mass , Oct. 17, '67. 
"Superheater saves 15 or 2U per cent, fuel; steam for 
paper milt now perfectly pure and dry— an Important ad- 
vantage in our business." 

Statkn Inland Fancy Dyeing Estab., June 18, 1867. 
"Superheater saves at least 25 percent In fuel, and we 
have the advantage (hardly to be over-estimated) ol per- 
fectly dry steam." 

JKtajL. Iron Wohks, San Francisco. Sept. 15, 1867. 
"Superheater saves 25 io 30 per cent, in fuel; no prim- 
ing " 

CoNTitA Costa Laundry, Oakland, July, 1868 
"Superheater causes a use of 50 lbs. steam Instead of 60 
lbs.; use much less water, and there is a saving in fuel." 
Havilaii M. Co., Oal., AugUHt, 1868. 
" superheater causes a use ol 40 lbs. steam instead of 60 
lbs ; use much less water, and there Is a saving of fuel." 
(2 sets.) 

Sixth Mechanics' Inst. Fair, S. F. Sept 4, 1868. 
" Superheater used proves that It saves fully 31) per cunt. 
In fuel." (Chief Engineer.) 

Nkvada Mill, Virginia City, May 30, 1869. 
"Siperhcater is a pertect success, and saves three cords 
of wood in ten, or 333.< per cent. In fuel; engine works 
better." 

Ana many other letters of the same tenor. 
Awiu-iU-d Silver AfediW, M o<: until c»' Institute', 

Sun Fraiiclneo, 1SOS. 
A«';inle.l Silver Medal, Maryland Institute* 
Baltimore. 



Send for Circular to -ETNA IRON WORKS, San Fran- 
cisco, California. BOOT. L. HARRIS. Agent. 
JOtIN L. CONSTABLE, Engineer. 25vl8tf 



ROOT'S PATENT FORCE BLAST ROTARY BLOWER. 

MANUFACTURED BY KEEP & BARG-ION, 

At the Globe Iron Works, Stockton, California. 




- 3 
3 < 

Pi 

. M 
Cl 

a 



iti:<ii:iiti:s 



Fifty Per Cent. 



LESS POWER 



Than i.ris Blower 



!S(<-:uli>-;lll|>.>~ 



One ol these Blowers may he seeu on exhibition at W. T. Garratt'n Brass Foundry, corner of 
Mission and Fromont streets. They are also in use at the Almatlen Quieksilvor Mine; Gridley'B 
Foundry, Gold Hill, Nevada ; JEtna Iron Works, San Francisco, and many other places. 

Cadtios. — Purchasers will find it to their advantage to apply direct to the Stockton Agency, as 
certain parties, not authorized to manufacture the Blower, have put in the market machines of inferior 
construction, which do not answer all the requirements of the genuine article. 

\ 
Quartz, Saw and Grist Mill Irons, Steam Engines, Morse Powers, HIgll and Low 

Pressure Steam BngLnee, Steamboats and Propellers, made at short notice. 



For circulars and further information, address 



KEEP & BABG-ION, 

Globe Iron "Work*. Stockton. Cnl. 



PAINE & STEPHENS' 
IMPEOVBD CONCENTRATOR, 

For Sn.vl.tg: Gold and Sliver Suluhureta. 

Si 




One machine, costing about $1,300, is sufficient to work the Sands from 25 to 30 Stamps, 

Less power being required than for any other Machine. The attention of qaa-tz raillraen throughout 
the State ts directed to the subjoined certificates, and if they desire they can visit the Amador Mining 
Co's mill, near Sutter Creek, the Eureka Co's mill at Grass Valley, or the Banner Co'a mill near 
Nevada, and see for themselves. 



CERTIFCATES t 

Grass Valley, Jan. 4th, I860. — 'This is to certify, that we have used the Paine, Stephens & 
Harry Concentrators for over twelve months. They have given us entire satisfaction, and are the 
best we ever used. WILLIAM WATT, Supt. Eureka Mine. 

This is to certify, that we have had in use for the past 18 months one of Paine, Stephens & Co's 
Sulphuret Saving Rlachines, constructed by John T. Harry, (called a buddlej and which operates 
satisfactorily, particularly so in saving fine sulphurets, and we reeommend it as well worthy of use, 
even where other Concentrators are used above it, as it will pay if there are any sulphurets. 

WM. L. TISDALE, Supt. Star Spangled Banner Mine. 

Nevada City, Oct. 26, 1868. 



BEBELLIOUS ORES. 

THE HAGAN FURNACE. 

The above method for the purification of Rebellious Orea 
is respectfully offered to the public. Repeated actual 
workings show that the 

HAGAN FTJRX»TA.CDE 

Will accomplish all that the Keverberatory Process will 
do, mill at an expense that is merely nominal. It has never 
failed to i rem any ore effuctually. 

It tins never been claimed for It that It will extract gold 
from ores which do not contain any of that metal. 

Parties owning rloh but refractory veins, can treat with 
the undersigned upon the basis of 

OITABAKTEED RESULTS, 
With responsible security. For an Interview, and all de- 
sired particulars, address 

THE PACIFIC ORE CO., 
P. O. Box lOlO, San Francisco. 
June 26 1869. 29vl8-3m 



Any one wishing to purchase one of these useful machines, can do so by applying to THOS. 
N. PAINE, at Grass Valley, Nevada County, or JOHN" T. HARRY, Sutler Creek, 
Amador County. 



RANSOME'S PATENT 

Diamond Grit Grindstones, 



"Warranted «l" I'lillurni Texture, 

TWICE AS STRONG AND WILL CUT AT LEAST TEN 

TIMES AS FAST AS THE BEST NATURAL 

STONEB. 

We manufacture the followlngqualltles, viz: 
"Until," lor Machinist*, etc. 
"Medium," for General Tfae. 
"Soft," for Woodworker*, Etc., 

Diameters, 4 to ?0 Inches; thickness, '., inch to 12 inches; 
and any tlnencss required. 

Solid Emery "Wheel* and Sharpening Stone*, 

Of nil forms and materials. 
These Stones are fa^tsuperseaiug thi- natural ones In En 
gland, the testu made there showing them to cut about ili'ty 
(50) times as tost as the Newcastle, and entirely free 
flaws, and hard and sort spots. 

HgyGrlndBtonea, with Frames, Iron Troughs, Shafts and 
Treadles, ready to set up In working order, for sale a 
wholesale or retail. 

PACIFIC STONE COMPANY, 

E. T. STEEN.Snp't., 
20vlHtf Cor. Turk and Larktn sts . Sun Francisco. 



3Votice to Mliueris, 

Well-Borers and Water Companies. 

MPBAG IS NOW PREPARED TO MANUFACTURE 
. Hydraulic and Artesian Well Pipes in the best work- 
manlike manner, and at the lowest market rules. Uuvlng 
made larce additions to my stock of machinery for that 
hrfi'ch of business, I am prepared to fill all orders with dis- 
patch, and guarantee entire satisfaction. I also manufac- 
ture Mississippi Stoves, oi" the latest improved pAtterns, for 
vessels of all classes. Also, Ship Plumbing done. 

M. 1'RAO, 
8vl3-lj Stove Store, No. I Cl»v street, below Davis. 



HATWARD & COLEMAN 

IMPORTERS AND REFINERS 



Illuminating, Lubricating, 



PAINT OILS, 

CONSISTING OF 

KEROSENE. I.AKD, SPERM, ELEPHANT. POLAR, 

TANNERS. NEATSFOOT, BOILED AND RAW 

LINSEED, CASTOR AND CHINA NUT. 



Spirits of Turpentine and Alcohol. 



Lamps and Lamp Stock ! 

An elegant and complete assortment. 

SOLE IMPORTERS OF 
Deroc's Illumina.tin.gr Oil" 

.PATENT CANS. 
r>vl7-if. 414: Front utreet. San Francisco. 



International Hotel, 

a^cK:so3v street 1 * 

BETWEEN MONTGOMERY AND KEARNY STS. t 

SAN FRA NCIS CO, CAL. 

THIS OLD ESTABLISHED HOUSE IS IN PERFECT 
order for the accommodation of guests. Persons seek- 
ing comfort and economy will find this the best Hotel in 
the city to stop at. The Beds are new and in good order, 
and the Rooms well ventilated. The Tablo will always be 
supplied with the best In the market. 
Prlcea vuryluc from £11 SO to S3 per day for 
Board and Room. 



031- 1 earns belonging to the House will be in attendance 
„t all the boati and cars to convey passengers to the House 
frkb op chaegk, and to any partof the city for SO cents 

alTl2 |P. E. WEYQA N Ti Proprietor, 



32 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 10, 1869. 



The " Cloud Bursts" of Nevada. 

Residents in the Great Basin frequently 
speak of " cloud bursts" — very remarkable 
sudden rain storms accompanied by thun- 
der and lightning which take place in the 
summer time, and which seem, therefore, 
to have their origin in the Gulf of Mexico. 

The rainy season of Sinaloa, Durango, 
Sonora, and partly of Arizona, takes place 
precisely at the hight of our dry season, 
and the storms come invariably from the 
Gulf. Standing on the peninsula of Lower 
California, and looking across the Gulf of 
California, there is frequently to be seen 
in midsummer a great wall of black rain 
and thunder cloud which has been heaped 
and rolled up by counter currents of the 
atmosphere, hanging for days, or weeks, 
without being able to make any farther 
advance westward. This mass coming from 
the Gulf of Mexico, draws northward [item 
for the " Avitor"] into Arizona and Nevada; 
furnishing the moisture for some heavy 
interior forests, such as those on the Uin- 
tah Mountains, in sight from the railroad 
beyond Salt Lake. 

So sudden are the " cloud bursts" of Ne- 
vada, that the name can scarcely be said to 
be a misnomer. A canon found so per- 
fectly dry, by the traveler, that he would 
not suspect it of having been rejoiced with 
water for many a year, may, in the space 
of a few minutes, pour down upon him 
such a boiling flood as will make the local- 
ity if narrow and confined, absolutely dan- 
gerous to vehicles or horsemen. Woodmen 
with teams, we are told, are not unfre- 
quently obliged to make a " run for it" in 
order to escape intact with their tools and 
belongings. 

The peculiar feature of these "cloud 
bursts" is that they are local. Some cause, 
or causes combined embraced under elec- 
tricity and temperature, effect the very sud- 
den condensation of cloud vapors over one 
locality. On the 25th inst. , a sudden storm 
of this kind took place at Austin, of which 
the Reveille says: 

A cloud was seen to gather and burst on 
Central Hill, above and a little south of the 
Boston mill. It discharged a volume of 
water equal, we should say, to 400 inches, 
which came rushing dowu the canon, and 
through the upper portion of the city. It 
maintained its full volume for a quarter of 
an hour, after which it subsided gradually. 

Neptunian Craters. 

In the limestone country of the "Western 
States — in Michigan, for example, near 
Green Lake, Kent County — there exist per- 
fectly formed craters in level alluvial soil, 
the resemblance of which to the inside of 
an old and weathered volcanic crater, is 
very remarkable. The depth and diameter 
vary, but are in the case referred to about 
75x100 feet. Calling to mind the vacancy 
in an unfilled bullet-mold, they were ac- 
counted for by the hypothesis that when 
the earth was molded, there was found not 
quite enough material on hand to fill up. 
The following, from an exchange, espe- 
cially if remembered in connection with 
our remarks on caves in the Nevada lime- 
stone rocks, will furnish a clue — Neptune 
being caught in the act : 

A portion of earth near the residence of 
Johnson, in Plainfield township, Michigan, 
sunk recently to a depth of eighty feet, 
carrying with it a number of trees and 
stumps. The open space is funnel shaped, 
about seventy feet across the top. Some of 
the trees lodged half way down the side, 
while others went to the bottom, leaving 
the leaves and branches withiu reach of the 
mouth of the opening. Two or three 
stumps and a log about fourteen feet in 
length thrown in, afterwards passed out of 
sight. A distant roaring sound as of rush- 
ing waters, is said to proceed from the 
chasm. 



Silk is manufactured extensively in Pat- 
terson, N. J., New York City, Hartford, and 
other Eastern cities, out of material from 
France, Italy, Japan and China. So soon 
as California has cocoons to spare, the 
proprietors of those mills will no doubt 
come alter them. 



Information for Inventors and 
Patentees. 



Ajy EXTRACT 

From the American and Foreign Patent 

Agency Circular of the Mining and 

Scientific Press, Dewey & Co., 

Publishers. 

Steps Necessary to Procure a 
Patent. 

The first thing required is a model, if your in- 
vention can be represented by one. It is not only 
immediately necessary in preparing the papers, 
but the law demands that the inventor shall, in all 
cases, furnish a model, which must not exceed 
twelve inches in any of its dimensions. A model 
of less size will answer when more convenient. It 
should be neatly made, of hard wood or metal, or 
both, and varnished or painted ; the name of the 
inventor and the name of the article should be en- 
graved or painted on it in a permanent manner. 

When the invention consists of an improvement 
on some known machine, a full working model of 
the whole will not be necessary. It should be suf- 
ficiently perfect, however, to show, with clearness, 
the nature and operation of the invention, and the 
relation of the new to the old parts of the ma- 
chine. 

As soon as the model is ready, it should be care- 
fully boxed and shipped by express, or otherwise, 
to our address, namely: DKWEY & CO., Mining 
and Scientific Press, San Francisco. Prepay ex- 
penses and send express receipt to us by mail. 

A full description must also be sent with the 
model, embodying all the ideas and claims of the 
inventor respecting the improvement, describing 
the various parts and their operation. 

Simultaneously with the model, the inventor 
should send us the first instalment of the Govern- 
ment fee, fifteen dollars. The money may be for- 
warded either by express with the model, or by 
registered letter, post office order, or by draft on San 
Francisco, payable to our order. Always send a 
letter with the model, and with the remittance, stat- 
ing the name and address of the sender. Ou re- 
ceipt of the model and Government first fee of 
SI 5 in currency, the case is duly registered on our 
books, and the application proceeded with as fast as 
possible. When the documents are ready we send 
them to the inventor by mail, for his examination, 
signature and acknowledgement before a Notary 
Public or Justice of the Peace, with a letter of in- 
struction, etc. Our fee for preparing the case is then 
due and will be called for. The case will then be 
presented to the Patent Office, and as soon as the 
patent is ordered to be issued the Government last 
fee of S20 in currency will be required. The law 
states that every patent shall be dated as of a day 
not later than six months after the timo at which 
it was passed and allowed, and notice thereof sent 
to the applicant or his agent. And if the final fee 
for such patent be not paid within the said six 
months, the patent shall be withheld, and at the 
expiration of two years the invention therein de- 
scribed shall become public property as against the 
applicant therefor. 

When the invention consists of a new article of 
manufacture, a medicine, or a new composition, 
samples of the separate ingredients, sufficient to 
make the experiment, (unless they are of a common 
and well known character), and also of the manu- 
factured article itself must be furnished, with full 
description of the entire preparation. 

For Processes, frequently no model or drawings 
are necessary. In such case the applicant has 
only to send us an exact description, and what it 
is desirable to claim. 

For Designs no models are necessary. Dupli- 
cate drawings are required, and the specifications 
and other papers should be made up with care and 
accuracy. In some instances two photographs, 
with the negatives, answer well instead of drawings. 

Inventors who do business with us will be noti- 
fied of the state of their application in the Patent 
Office, when it is possible for us to do so We do 
not require the personal attendance of the inventor, 
unless the invention is one of great complication, 
usually the business can be well done by corres- 
pondence. 

The usual time required to secure a patent, when 
the case is conducted at our agency, is from one 
to two months. We sometimes get them through in 
two weeks. In rare cases, however, owing to delay 
on the part of Government officials, the period is 
sometimes extended for months. We make a 
special point to advance our cases as rapidly as 
possible, and have been successful in obtaining 
patents for this coast more surely and speedily 
than any other agency in the United States. 

Letters Patent and Who Can 
Obtain them. 

A patent is an open letter, embodying all the 
language of an inventor or his agent, contained in 
the specification, without alteration, and is granted 
to citizens of the United States, or Foreigners, 
male or females, (including minors), and is 
signed by the Secretary of the Interior and the 
Commissioner of Patents, with the seal of the Pat- 
ent Office affixed. Its jurisdiction is for the whole 
United States, for the term of seventeen years. 

Citizens of Canada and Nova Scotia have to 
pay a fee of S5U0 for patents in the U. S., owing 
to discriminations made against Americans. 

IJ^-Our Illustrated Pamphlet, from which the 
above is an extract, will be furnished free on re- 
ceipt of postage stamp. Confidential advice given, 
and every legitimate branch of Patent Soliciting 
business promptly and faithfully executed, by 

DEWEY & CO., 

Publishers Mining; and Scientific Press, 414 Clay 
street, San Francisco. 



New Advertisements. 



Miss Anna E. Dickinson 

— WILL GIVE — 

XHEEE LECTURES 

— A» — 

PLATT'S MUSIC HALL. 



MONDAY, JXTI/T l»th. 

SUBJECT "WHAT NEXT?" 

WEDNESDAY, JTTI.Y 14th. 

SUBJECT "A STRUQGLE FOR LIFE." 

FRIDAY, JULT 16th. 

SUBJECT " NOTH.I SO UNREASONABLE." 

Tioliets, - - - : One X>ollar, 

For sale at the principal Book Stores, and at the Hail upon 
the evenings of the Lectures. Doors open at 7; Lecturo 
begins lit 8 o'clock. 
2vl9.1w J. ALEXANDER, Agent. 

GEORGE B. ELLERY, 
Practical Mining Engineer, 

TREASURE CITY, 

White Pine Nevada. 

2vl9tf 

C*mviitssiiij>" 

-Agreirt 

Wanted ! 

A first-class Canvassing Agent can secure a good situa 
tion by calling at this office. 

DEWEY 4 CO., 
Publishers Mining and Scientific Press. 

Pot One Dollar, Ooin, Postage Paid. 

QUARTZ OPERATOR'S 

HAND-BOOK. 

— DT — 

WHEELER & RANDALL. 

San Francisco, 1865. 

A cheap and bandy book for Quartz Pros- 
pectors, Millmen, and Amateur 
Assayers. 

This little wort, of 130 pages, although partly devoted to 
a discussion of limited interest to general readers, contains 
instructions In IheWuRKING AND ASSAYING OF ORES, 
AND TABLES FOR REFERENCE, which renders it quite 
desirable and of frequent service. 

Price, $1, coin— Si 30 in currency or postage stamps. For 
sale by »EW\EX <fe CO., 

Mining and Scientific Press, Sau Francisco. 



Sheffield Scientific School 

Of Yale College, Aew lluven, Coan. 

This department of Yale College, instituted in 1840, and 
endowed with the National Lund Grant in lcSWJ, furnishes 
advanced instruction in the various branches of Mathe- 
matical. Physical, and Natural Science. 

The School is under the direction of the President of the 
College, a Board of thirteen Professors in different special 
ties, and six assistant instructors. 

Regular courses of study, leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Philosophy, conferred by Vale College, arc ar- 
ranged as follows: i— rni-_uiM nv and .M im;iul..i;i-. a— Civil 
Engineering. 3— Mkuuahical Lmum-.i.i.i.m; 4— .Mining 
Esginkhking and Mi: i Ai.i.u kg v. 5 — AcmcDLTUittt. (j — Nat- 
ural llii'iiniy .iMii.MiLtnjv, and 7— Select Uoukse. 

Advanced students arr» also admitted io optional courses, 
and if already College graduates, arc received as candi- 

ates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition, S123 per year of forty weeks. 

The Libraries, Museums, Laboratories and Apparatus, 
accessible to students, are vailed and extensive. 

For copies of the Annual Clrcuiur and Keport letters 
may be addressed to the "Secn-iary of the bhettield Scien- 
tific School," New Haven. Conn. I3vti-lvl6p 



MAGAZ1NKS. 


Per An. 


W. E, L00MI8, 




$4 0.. 

3 Ob 

6 0i 

6 u. 
15 




News Dealer 




New 1'ork Ledger 


AND STATIONER, 


bloursal Home — 

Good Words 

Peterson's 


Southeast curner Sansome and 
Washington streets, 


Lady's Friend 

Harper's Weekly.. 
Jhimney Corner. . . 
Liiterary Album... 

London Society 

All the Year Round 
London 111. News.. 


EAt)T£SX 
E»EXtIO DICALS 

iy the Year, Month or Number 



Rolling Mill Company, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Established for the Manufacture of 

RAILROAD AND OTHER IRON 

Every "Variety of Shafting^ 

Embracing ALL SIZES of 
Steamboat Shafts, Crunk.*), Piston and Con- 
necting JKocIb, Car mid Locomutive Axltn 
and Frames 

— also — 

Hammered iron 

Of every description and size. 

0®- Orders addressed to PACIFIC KtiLLINQ MILL 
COMPANY Post Office, Sau Francisco, Cal., will receive 
prompt attention. 

g&~ The highest price paid for Scrap Iron yviJbm9p 



W. T. GARRATT, 
City 

BRASS AND BELL FOUNDER 



Cot* Mission and. Fremont sts., 

SAN FRAKCI3CO. 

Manufacturer of Brass, Zinc, and Anti-Friction or 

Rabbet Metal Castings; 

CHURCH AND STEAMBOAT 

BELLS, 

TAVFRfi AND BAND BELLS AND GONGS. 

FIRE ENGINES, FORCE AND LIFT PUMPS, 

Steam, Liquor, Soda Oil, Water and Flange Cocks, and 

Valves of all descriptions, made and repaired. Hose and 

all other Joints, Spelter, Solder, and Copper Rivets, Ac. 

Gauge Cocka, Cylinder Cocks, Oil Globes, Steam Whistles 

HTIIRAULIC PIPES AM> KOZZEJLS 
For Mining purposes, Iron Steam Pipe furnished with Fit- 
tings, Ac. Coupling Joints of all sizea. Particular attention 
paid to Distillery "Work. Manufacturer of "Garratt's Pat- 
tent Improved Journal Metal," 

JJ®* Highest Market price paid for OLD BELLS, COPPEB 
AND BRASS. -A**T fit! 

N. W. SPATJLDING, 

Saw Smithing and Repairing 

ESTABLISHMENT. 




Nos. 17 and IO Fremont St., near Market, 

MANCFACTDRKR OF 

SPAULDING'S 

Patent Tooth Circular Saws. 

Xhey have proved themselves, to be the numt 
durihble and economical Saws In the World. 

EAGH SAW IS WARRANTED IN EVERY RESPECT. 

Particular attention paid to construction of 

Portable & Stationary Saw Mills. 

MILLS FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE, 
At the lowest Market Prices. 

QPAULDING & BARTO, 

BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS, 

Mining and Soientifio Fiess Office, 

3STO. 414 CHEATS' STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

CARDS, 

BILL-HEADS, 
RECEIPTS, 

CIRCULARS, 

HAND-BILLS, 
POSTERS, 
LABELS, 

AND 

PRINTING OF ALL KINDS FOR BUSINESS MEN 

BRIEFS, 

TRANSCRIPTS, and 
LEGAL BLANKS, 

Neatly, Correctly and Promptly Printed. 



Planers and Matchers, 

SIlll'l.lllJG .VMS TF..\OXI.\<J 

MACHIM ESS, 

Of the most improved manufacture, with also every 
description 

XtlCHABDeON, MeRIAM & Co'S CELEBRATED 



Wood ftla 
Working mu 




W. O. M. Berry &. Co. IN California St Snn Francisco. 

Embracing Planers, Matchers and Morttsers, Moulding, 
Tenonins, Boring, Shaping, Vertical and Circular Re-saw- 
ing Machines; Scroll, Railway, Cut oil' and Rip Saws, etc, 
cic. Agents for the Swam-cot Co's 
Improved Forta"ble Engines, 

Davis & Furber's Woolen Machinery; Blake's Palent 
Steuin Pumps; Kilburn's and Warren's Turbine Water 
Wheels, etc , etc. 

Ordrrs for Machinery of any kind will receive prompt 
attention Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 

W. O. M. BERRY & CO., 

22vl8-3ml6p 114 California st, San Francisco. * 



HELIOGRAPHIC 

STEEL ENGRAVING AND PRINTING COMPANY. 
E.VON EGLOFFSTEIX, Sunt, 
133 and 135 West Twentv-fiiih st.. New York. 
Steel Eneravings [.roduced bv an Improved process at 
one third the usual rales. Portraits. Country Stats, Illus- 
trated Circulars, Kenrodnctions of Km; ravines Designs 
eic JNO. VINCENT HI JOINS. Sole Agent, 

3vl8-6mI6p Q58 Broadway, New York. 




A Journal of Useful Arts, Science, Mining, Farming, and Mechanical Progress. 



BT DEWPA' & <<>.. 
Plttont Solicitors. 



San Francisco, Saturday, July 17, 1869. 



VOLUME XIX. 
> II in 1 >.-i- 3. 



Table of Contents. 



'I bd Hum*' I'm 

suit'.. Date Latch, ni« 

. Ni V... 
1 Law .. M 

Abolition '■( Patent Rights 

bind 34 

I'll. 11I Law 11. ins J; 

Ui '1 :»lt BertUIsera 411 

J.' ctnre 1; 11 Lightning. 16 

Sheffield Scion. School.. 40 

HLiti- h Iti.s 33 

I alloy Strik,- 41 

Representative Hen 33 

Engineering and mining 

Journal 

lhiii.l~.Mt Minis 41 

Polytechnic [nstitnto.... 41 
Oal. Arml. uf Bot 

BallDoad Progress II 

l'.istul Telegraphing 4( 

I'AltMINli AJfD GaIIDENINU.— 

Grafting! Pi itatoes: A Cali- 
fornia Dairy; Cattle Fid 
ou Fish; Fowler's Steam 
Plow 



I'AMiuut SCIENCE — Food, 
iiinl lli-w t.iKat It; Flour, 
i. . ,i and Bad; How to 
read a Gas Meter; etc.. it 

M'i ii wnc u. PnOOBEBH.— 

The Black Sea Cable; Pho. 

tograpbic Papi r; Self-Reg. 

iBtoring Oompaaa; etc. ;;■"' 

SCIENTXVIO Piookesh. — 

Tli.- Anioiat Eclipse; Coin- 
it Composed of Cai'bon 
Vapor; Life a Molecular 

Property; etc. 35 

HiHXNa si.MM.MtY. — Callfor- 
nlai Arizona. Colorado, 
Id;. ti'. Nevada, Oreyon, 
ami N.-W Mexico :;s 

Stock REvraw.— 6tocS Clr- 

ular; Shareholders' Di- 

ectory; Markets, etc.. -jl 

CuMl'ANV TRANSACTIONS, — 

Meetings. Elections, etc.; 

New Incorporations. . . 29 

Patents ami Inventions.. 28 

To Ci irrespondeZLtB ill 



Representative Men. 

Some fifty or seventy-five gentlemen, 
capitalists, representing the chief cities 
of the Mississippi Valley and Atlantic 
Coast, have arrived in this city during the 
past week. "They come," so says report, 
" to prospect the State commercially; to see 
what they can buy or sell, or to search out 
a place in which to established a branch or 
an original business." Some of them will 
no doubt conclude that California is the 
best location that presents for certain 
classes of business, both foreign and do- 
mestic; and we presume a large propor- 
tion of these visitors will arrange for busi- 
ness relations on this coast, of greater or 
less magnitude, before they return. 

This movement is one which cannot fail 
to be productive of much good, in estab- 
lishing commercial harmony and recipro- 
city between the emporium of the Pacific, 
and our Eastern cities. The East want 
teas, silks, etc., and come to San Fran- 
cisco to see if some better mode of ob- 
taining them cannot be devised, than the 
hitherto tedious passage around Cape 
Horn, or across the Isthmus. Much will 
also be done by this notable visit, towards 
still farther facilitating commercial rela- 
tions between our Western and Eastern 
cities, and the new locations which are 
springing up all through the great inte- 
rior of the continent, and now made tribu- 
tary to the East and West by the comple- 
tion of our great national highway. 

The Incbease of Tempeeatdbe TJndee 
Gbotjnd. — A committee, composed of Dr. 
Everett, Sir C. Lyell, Principal Forbes, 
Mr. J. C. Maxwell, Prof. Phillips, Mr. G. 
J. Symons, Mr. Balfour Stewart, Prof. 
Ramsay, Mr. Geikie, Mr. Glashier, Rev. 
Dr. Graham, Mr. E. W. Binnie, Mr. Geo. 
Mann and Mr. Pengelly, was appointed by 
the British Association at the Dundee 
meeting (1867), for the purpose of investi- 
gating the rate of increase of underground 
temperature downwards in various locali- 
ties of dry land and under water,|for which 
a sum amounting to £250 was placed at 
their disposal. The names are a guarantee 
that the investigation will be a searching 
one. The report may probably appear in 
the next volume of the transactions of the 
Association, which may be anticijjated in 
the course of the current fall. 



The Burns' Furnace at Meadow Lake. 

The accompanying cut is after a drawing 
of Mr. Robert M. Burns' furnace, the prin- 
ciple of which has been tried at Meadow 
Lake, Nevada County, on a small scale. 

' ' Certainly, some day, " — say the Truckee 
Tribune, — "some one will discover a proc- 
ess for the reduction of these ores, and 
when it is discovered and put in operation, 
Meadow Lake district will not be surpassed 
in the State; as it is, it must rest beneath 
its robe of snow, a deserted district." The 
auriferous iron pyrites of Meadow Lake 
contain $60 to $70 to the ton, but are more 
than usually "refractory," owing to the 



the fumes to the chimney, H; a damper 
slide, I, being connected with a rod by 
which to regulate the draft. The time of 
roasting is about twenty-four hours. 

• At the end of that time the ore is drawn 
through the opening seen iu the bottom of 
the furnace. It falls into a tank contain- 
ing a solution, the exact operation of which 
is not fully understood. On drawing off 
the water into another tank the ore resem- 
bles ashes in consistency, and is said to 
be in a condition to be amalgamated with 
very favorable results. 

Tests similar to those at Meadow Lake 
were recently made at Indian Valley, Plu- 



THE BURNS' PATENT FURNACE. 



presence of other unfavorable mineral in- 
gredients. 

Mr. Burns claims to have solved the 
problem of profitable working. His 
method of procedure will bo understood 
from the engraving, with the aid of a few 
words of explanation. 

The ore is not pulverized, but is fed at 
once, in small pieces, through the hopper, 
E, into the chamber, D, where it is ex- 
posed to the influence of flame from the 
fireplace, Ii 1 , and of steam from the pipes, 
K, K, ly, obtained by heating water in the 
boiler, B, over the fireplace, whereby it 
is claimed that waste from volatilization 
or meehanioal loss from draft is entirely 
prevented. A covered way, G, condupts 



mas County, and parties witnessing the 
same have been so favorably impressed, we 
are told, that arrangements have been made 
for the construction of a furnace. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Burns is the inventor of 
the process, as has already been published 
by the press throughout the State. After 
the patent is obtained, we may be at liberty 
t} publish a more complete description — 
the solution used being a considerable 
portion of the invention. 

Those desirous of obtaining further in- 
formation on the subject, are referred to 
Robert M. Burns, Meadow Lake, Nevada 
County, or John H. Blood, Indian Valley, 
Plumas County. A patent for the above 
has been applied for through Dewey & Co. 




Award of Bounties for Mulberries, 
Cocoons, etc. 

The State Board of Judges met at Agri- 
cultural Hall, Sacramento, on Thursday, 
to make awards to the parties claiming 
bounties for plantations of mulberry trees, 
for cocoons, hops, and manufactures. Spe- 
cimens of mulberry trees and cocoons, and 
worms in every stage of progress, were ex- 
hibited. The cocoons were very fine, and 
pronounced by competent judges the hand- 
somest ever exhibited in the United States. 
By general consent it was conceded that the 
exhibit of Smith Brothers was the best. 

Following are the names of exhibitors, 
the amounts claimed, and what for : 

Mulberry Plantations of five thousand 
trees, over two years old, under the Act of 
1866 : I. N.Hoag, $6,125; C. W. Reed, Yolo, 
$8,875; John Smith, $500; Wm. M. Haynie, 
$300; E. F. Aiken, $375; J. T. Harbison, 
T. B. Flint; Leon Lambert, San Jose; M. 
Souffignon, San Jose; D. A. Merritt, T. G. 
H. Jones, and G. C. Holman, $250 each; A. 
P. Smith & Bro., $100; and G. L. Henry, 
$125; — making an aggregate of $18,150. 

For Cocoons— Thos. A. Geary, $360. 

For Hops-David Flint, $1,000. 

The Agent of the Oakland Cotton Mills 
submitted for examination a bolt of cotton 
drilling, claiming therefor the bonus of 
$2,000. 

The Mission Woolen Mills exhibit sam- 
ples of tweeds, cassimeres, broad and pilot 
cloths, claiming therefor bounties amount- 
ing to $15,000. 

After some considerable discussion, the 
claims of Messrs. Hoag, Reed, Harbison, 
Aiken, Haynie, John Smith and A.P. Smith, 
were severally allowed ; as also were the 
claims of Mr. Geary for cocoons; of the 
Oakland C. M. Co., and for the Mission 
Woolen Mills for manufactures were also 
allowed — aggregating a total of $33,785. 

Anothee Atlantic Cable. — The French 
cable which is to connect the United States 
with the French port of Brest via St. Pierre, 
a French island just to the southward of 
New Fouudland, has been successfully 
landed by the Great Eastern at St. Pierre. 
The length of cable paid out was 2,325 
miles, or 861 miles longer than the English 
cable. The remaining portion of the cable 
from St. Pierre to its landing near Boston, 
will be 722 miles in length, and will soon 
be paid out by a ship, on beard of which 
it has already been placed. The comple- 
tion of this cable will no doubt have the 
effect to materially reduce the cost of Eu- 
ropean telegraphing. 

Shoddy Foe Upholsteet. — Mr. Phillip 
Hirlemen and Mr. Julius Inholsky, have 
started a shoddy and batting mill on Berry 
street, occupying a part of the ground 
floor in Emanuel's Planing Mill and Fac- 
tory. The machinery was furnished by 
Berry & Co., of this city, and is of the 
most improved make. They design increas- 
ing the capabity of the mill iu a short 
time. They manufacture wool and cotton 
shoddy for upholstery and other purposes, 
of various grades, and cotton, batting aud 
wadding. 



34 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 17, 1869. 



Communications. 



Account of Reveille and Adjoining 
Districts. 

[Written for the Mining and Scientific Press.] 
Since my return from Reveille, I have 
paid a little attention to the mines on the 
lower sides of Treasure Hill, with a view to 
the collection of some statistics and facts 
that would seem to have some bearing upon 
the question as to whether rich ores will be 
found at considerable depth — say from 500 
to 1,000 feet from the top of the hill. I first 
visited the Virginia, situated on the north 
end of the hill a little below the Mammoth 
and " Omega," perhaps about half way in 
point of elevation from Hamilton to the 
summit of Treasure Hill. The works are 
on the left hand of the grade and can be 
easily seen on the way from Hamilton to 
Treasure City. I found at the mine, Mr. 
Geo. A. Willard, the recently, appointed 
Superintendent, who, although a young 
man, seems to have the courtesy, the expe- 
rience and the rustling business energy 
and promptitude necessary to make him a 
successful manager of a mine. 

I confess myself much disappointed at 
the appearance of this mine. It is work- 
ing twelve men at present. It has a tunnel 
200 feet long, being nearly completed to the 
bottom of the shaft, which is 30 feet deep. 
Short drifts have been made each way. 
The shaft shows a body of ore apparently 
pitching southwest on a southeast and 
northwest course. A hundred feet south- 
erly from the shaft, the lime cap is 
stripped off, showing two other bodies of 
ore about six or eight feet wide, pitching 
and bearing the same as the first or princi- 
pal ledge. From the appearance of the 
100-foot surface it would seem to be one 
grand body of ore, with strata of limestone 
interspersed. It seems to have more sys- 
tem and regularity than most deposits, and 
yet lacks the definite walls of a true fissure 
vein which may be found at a greater depth. 
There is a body of ore in sight. Prom the 
surface opening, including the shaft, thirty 
feet deep, and the two short drifts of ten 
feet, there has been piled upon the dump 
about 300 tons of milling ore, estimated 
from numerous assays at $250 per ton. Mr. 
Janin's dump sample was, as we learn, 
$255 per ton. Almost an unlimited amount 
of ore can be taken out as soon as mills can 
be obtained to crush it. 

The Newark Mill, under the direction of 
Col. Avery, is about to commence on this 
rock at $50 per ton, roasting process, which 
process is necessary in reduction. I "cab- 
baged" under the eye of the Superintend- 
ent, two pieces from the dump, one weigh- 
ing about eight pounds, and the other 
about two pounds, which assay a fraction 
over $2,000 to the ton. 

Mr. Willard has a "theory" about the 
" belt" which looks quite plausible. He 
called my attention to the light appearance 
of the surface rock, — a belt two or three 
hundred feet wide running southeasterly 
and northwesterly in a direct line from the 
Phoenix and Peatherstone, crossing the 
Hamilton grade, taking in the Virginia, 
Aladdin's Lamp, Mammoth, Sheboygan and 
Omega, and extending to and including 
the Pocotillo. Another party from Bullion 
Hill informs me that that Hill is a continu- 
ation of the same line and the same gen- 
eral belt. As to these theories I express 
no opinion; but others, acting Upon the 
suggestion, can observe for themselves as 
they pass over the ground. The Virginia 
proper is 600 feet, and the Aladdin's Lamp 
adjoining, and now included in the incor- 
poration, is 1,000 feet, for all of which 
there are 16,000 shares of stock, now under 
an assessment of $1.25 per share. 

The Peatherstone is situated on the 
lower hill, just back and west of Hamilton, 
and about half a mile from the Virginia. 
We found no one at the mine; but consid- 
erable work has been done, and considera- 
ble ore, apparently medium grade, is on 
the dump. The ledge is "faced up" some 
distance lengthwise, and stripped to a 
much greater distance. While it does not 
rank with the first-class mines, it shows 



sufficient positive mineral wealth, both in Universal 
quantity and quality, to justify more ex- 
tensive operations. 

The Mammoth is situated just above the 
Virginia, and in close proximity. The 
works and extensive croppings are the 
most prominent feature on the Backbone 
of the hill, about three hundred yards 
north of and below Treasure Peak. The 
croppings are similar in general appearance 
to the croppings of the Virginia. 

The Omega is the first south extension of 
the Mammoth, and the Sheboygan is a lit- 
tle above and to the west of the latter. 
The Mammoth Co. allege that the Sheboy- 
gan, men are jumpers. However this may 
be, the latter have faced into the ledge 
about thirty feet lengthwise, which work 
exhibits its course and pitch much better 
than all the work done 'on the Mammoth 
claim. They have taken out considerable 
good ore, and apparently have a well- 
marked, broad ledge, dipping into the hill 
directly under the bottom of the Omega 
shaft. The Mammoth (if my memory 
serves me rightly) has the first location on 
the hill after the Hidden Treasure. The 
present holders or Trustees seem to think 
they have as good a thing as they want, and 
content themselves with "tracing out 
jumpers " rather than in developing the 
mine." They have made innumerable cuts, 
ditches and holes, one small attempt at a 
tunnel, and have done considerable work in 
" facing in " at the north end of the large 
croppings. There are five or six shafts, 
from fifteen to twenty-five feet deep, and 
drifts are being run from one shaft to an- 
other, and at all points they find large 
bodies of medium and low-grade ore, 
worth from $40 to $100 per ton. Of course 
selected pieces assay much higher. I saw 
an assay from the corner of a two-pound 
piece which gave $40 per ton; and the 
mhole piece pounded up, and two different 
assays made from pulp, gave, one $274 per 
ton and the other $276. I have been in- 
formed that assays have been made as high 
as $1,600 per ton. Though they have found 
some chloride rock, yet neither it nor the 
exceptional high assays furnish a criterion 
by which to classify the valuation in its 
present state of development. These little 
smatterings of chlorides and exceptional 
assays may be received as indications of 
what may be found in the mine when it is 
fairly opened down to the level of the Vir- 
ginia, or even a hundred feet. As it stands 
in its present state of development, it must 
be classed as a large mine, with almost un- 
limited quantities of from $50 to $100 
rock, but liable at any time, in sinking, to 
strike rock as rich as the Virginia and Hid- 
den Treasure, lying on either side of it. 
All the works both of the Sheboygan and 
Mammoth show the ledge, ledges or bodies 
to be on a line with the Virginia, and appa- 
rently to have the same course and dip 
into the mountain. 

With one-tenth the expenditure, the 
Omega has done more thanr,both the other 
mines together. It is simply good mining 
for this country. It is the difference be- 
tween the concentrated action and energy 
of a single experienced brain and the di- 
vided counsels of larger companies. The 
Omega, calculating the dip on the ledge, 
started above on the side of the hill, and 
without "fuss or feathers," have sunk a 
shaft 85 feet, well timbered, in true miner's 
style. It is now in spar and some mineral, 
and if the ledge continues to dip, as at the 
Sheboygan, the shaft will be fairly into it 
at a depth of 100 or 120 feet. 

So much for the mines on the north slope 
of the mountain which apparently pitch 
into the heart of Treasure Hill. In all 
cases where I have spoken of ledges, lodes, 
deposits or bodies of ore, I have used the 
terms as synonyms. I have no opinion on 
the subject of true " fissure veins. " There 
seems to be some lode, some mantas deplata, 
some deposits, some little streaks and pock- 
ets; and sometimes the object of the 
miner's search is diffused in limestone and 
almost every other kind of rock which the 
country produces. God has made nothing 
in disorder — though it would appear other- 
wise here. In our next we will speak of 
claims on the other side of the mountain. 
Las Minas. 



Law. — Is Heat 
Matter? 



a Form of 



Death of a Chemist. — Prof. H. Dus- 
sauce, a chemist of some eminence, who 
has been a regular contributor to the col- 
umns of the American Artisan for several 
years, died suddenly at his residence in 
New Lebanon, N. Y., on Sunday night, 
June 20th. He was by birth a Frenchman, 
and had formerly been employed in the 
laboratories of the French Government, 
and had been Professor of Industrial 
Chemistry to the Polytechnic Institute, 
Paris. He had been many years in this 
country, and was the author of several 
works on industrial chemistry. 



[Written for the Mining and Scientific Press.] 
All the physical and metaphysical theo- 
ries of the ancient Egyptians were founded 
upon the principle that solar heat is the 
cause of life and motion, throughout crea- 
tion. They point us to the influence of 
the sun, which is constantly exercising an 
omnipotent energy through air, ocean, and 
earth; producing climate, regulating sea- 
sons, and causing evaporation and rain. 
He fans the air with the atmosphere, and 
his alternate smiles and frowns give sun- 
shine and storm. 

Among the most enlightened nations of 
antiquity, elementary fire was regarded, 
not only as the most refined and spiritual 
essence of all the elements, but as a uni- 
versal and self-acting principle, which they 
considered identical with existence or be- 
ing. Learned etymologists have shown 
that the word " am " denoted both heat 
and existence, among the early Egyptians; 
who, believing it to be the cause of motion 
and organization throughout nature, in- 
scribed it upon the great, door of one of 
their temples. 

As everything in nature is arranged by 
measure, number and weight, we are led 
to inquire, What is matter? In the first 
place, we "are informed that matter is com- 
posed of exceedingly small, hard and un- 
changeable atoms, which vary in magni- 
tude, and which are so arranged and com- 
bined as to produce an endless diversity of 
mineral, vegetable, and animal bodies. We 
are led to inquire further: Are those atoms 
divisible ? If they are infinitely divisible, 
a finite body must consist of an infinite 
number of parts, which is a contradic- 
tion. It follows, then, that matter must 
consist of ultimate atoms, and that being 
compressible, the atoms not being in con- 
tact one with the other, it must be sur- 
rounded by some elastic medium. The 
celebrated Doctor Black, when he discov- 
ered latent or combined heat, and proved 
by accurate experiments that definite meas- 
ures of heat or caloric are required to con- 
vert solids into liquids, and that the same 
subtle fluid is obtained from the atmos- 
phere, by respiration, he uncovered a great 
truth. 

But electricity has been put forth as ac- 
complishing the same thing, and is called 
the key to unlock the cabinet of nature. 
Franklin and Faraday called it a material 
fluid, and have said definite measures 
thereof belong to each element of ponder- 
able matter. Prof. Davy, Arago, and 
others, found that electricity is capable of 
producing all the phenomena of magnetic 
action, on a small scale. They succeeded 
in producing an electric spark, from a per- 
manent magnet, and arrived at the conclu- 
sion that electricity and magnetism are 
identical. It has been demonstrated, ex- 
perimentally, by numerous philosophers, 
that all varieties of electricity are essen- 
tially the same. What can be more differ- 
ent than ice water and steam; yet they are 
composed of the same elements, combined 
with different proportions of caloric. What 
can be more unlike than the opposite forces 
of attraction and repulsion, contraction 
and expansion; yet it has been proved that 
they are both produced by caloric, under 
certain conditions. Caloric unites atoms 
of matter, as in chemical union, and under 
other conditions destroys this chemical 
union, as in vapor and combustion. If ca- 
loric is the physical cause of all motion, 
then what is electricity but the same thing, 
in a modified condition; only that electric- 
ity is developed under certain conditions; 
while calorie is manufactured under all 
conditions, while the sun exists. 

What is this caloric or heat ? Is it ma- 
terial or not — is it cause or effect ? Upon 
the answer to this question a great mystery 
depends. Chemists and philosophers are 
divided. Eumford, Tyndall, and others, 
deny its materiality, and assert it to be an 
effect only of motion. If this is so, then 
what is the cause of motion ? The answer 
would be, Force, which is a power capable 
of originating motion, supposing every- 
thing at rest, and maybe traced to attrac- 
tion and repulsion, or the primary and vis- 



ible effects of these two forces as exhibited 
in the expansion and contraction of mat- 
ter. 

Now if it is true, that the elastic force of 
bodies is augmented by every addition and 
diminished by every abstraction of caloric, 
is it not proof that caloric is the cause, 
and not the effect, of attraction and repul- 
sion ? Then as to its materiality, it has 
been estimated by Isaac Newton and others 
that the atoms of all bodies are surrounded 
by an elastic medium, which prevents con- 
tact, and that the pores of gold occupy 
about the same space as its solid atoms, and 
that water pores are forty times greater 
than its solid atoms, and that every 
change in temperature is attended with 
motion. Among the particles of bod- 
ies, it shows that caloric is a self-active 
principle, and if it is true that all bodies 
are full of caloric, that it occupies 827 
parts, by volume, of the atmosphere, and 
1,719 parts of steam, it must constitute the 
greater part of the globe we inhabit; iu 
bulk, it must be material, as all good ther- 
mometers will show. With mathematical 
certainty it is self-evident that it augments 
the volumes of solids, liquids and gases, 
which are again reduced by abstracting 
what was added;" that it passes by radiation 
through the most perfect vacuum, and 
shows the same effects as in the atmos- 
phere; that it exerts mechanical and chem- 
ical forces which nothing can restrain, as in 
volcanos, explosion of gunpowder, nitro- 
glycerine, etc.; it operates sensibly on the 
nervous system, giving pain and disorder 
when in excess; that it modifies the forms, 
properties and conditions, of all other bod- 
ies in an endless variety of ways, is pre- 
sumptive evidence of its materiality. 

W. 



Abolition of Patent Rights in 
England. 

The subject has been seriously discussed 
in the English House of Commons of abol- 
ishing the entire patent system. The ac- 
complishment of such abackward step would 
be deeply deplored by every intelligent 
citizen who delights in the progress of in- 
vention, art and science. 

Some of the numerous reasons why in- 
ventors should be encouraged and pro- 
tected, are well set forth in the protest 
against repealing the laws, by the "In- 
ventors' Institute," as follows : 

1. It is the duty of the state to encourage 
invention by every legitimate means, in 
order to enable this country to maintain its 
supremacy in mechanical and chemical 
arts. 

2. That the inventor is entitled to rea- 
sonable remuneration for his labor, expend- 
iture, and skill, equally as much as the 
author or the artist is entitled to copyright 
for his book or work of art. 

3. Thatthe patent system, though defect- 
ive, is the best practical method of remu- 
nerating inventors yet devised, inasmuch as 
under it those persons only who use inven- 
tions, and to whom, therefore, they may be 
assumed to be of service, pay for their use. 

4. Experience shows that no system of 
rewards from the state could ever be made 
to work satisfactorily, either in the interests 
of inventors or the public. 

5. The inventor, as distinct from the 
manufacturer, has a right to be heard be- 
fore the patent laws are abolished or ma- 
terially altered. 

6. Inventors — and especially those be- 
longing to the working classes, to which 
classes the great majority of inventors be- 
long — are entirely opposed to the aboli- 
tion of the patent laws, though they ear- 
nestly desire their amendment. 

7. That by a good system of patent law 
the progress of the trade and industry of 
the country would be largely benefited, as 
the whole inventive talent of the nation 
will be thereby incited to strenuous and 
continued efforts to-maintain our industrial 
position against the very active pressure < f 
foreign competition now affecting our com- 
mercial prosperity. 

8. The workingmen, who are largely rep- 
resented by the present deputation, are es- 
pecially anxious to find themselves in posi- 
tion, under an amended patent law, in 
which they can not only safely exhibit their 
inventions in public, but be enabled to 
reap the fruits of improved education and 
increased application of invention. 

The English patent laws are nearly as 
cumbersome as the " great seal " (com- 
posed of three or four pounds of sealing 
wax), which is attached to all patents 
when issued; but this is no reason why the 
laws should be entirely abolished. 



July 17, 1809.] 



Tr^e Mining and Scientific Press. 



35 



Jfec/tanicat Progress. 



The Black Sea Cable. 

The Indo-European Telegraph Company 
•will soon lay down between the Crimen 
and a point on the Asiatic shore of the 
Black Sun. the cablo just completed for it 
by the Messrs. Siemens. The MtcJumias' 
Magazine tutu desoribea the manuer of pre- 
pariug the copper sheating which protects 
the doublo serving of best Italian hemp 
that surrounds the cox-o of copper and 
gutta porcha : 

"The shoathing is of strips of flat cop- 
per $j inch in diameter, laid helically. Tho 
popper selected is of the best quality, and 
arrives in the shape of long broad sheets. 
These sheets nro first passed through tho 
shearing machine, where, by means of 
knives placed abovo and below, tho entire 
sheet, as it passos through, is divided 
throughout its breadth into equal narrow 
strips of the breadth required. Oncoming 
away from the shearing machine the strips 
are wound on small bobbins. If a strip of 
metal oranythiug bo attempted to bo wound 
around a long cylinder, it will infallibly 
bulge up and tend toward the trumpet 
form, and in order to prevent such a result 
happening to tho copper strip in thecable, 
it undergoes a process termed "rabbeting." 
Each strip, before going .to tho sheathing 
machine, passes through this operation, 
which consists in slightly bending its edge 
and grooving its center. The bobbins are 
then taken to the closing machine for the 
final process. After two servings, in re- 
verso directions, each of twenty compound 
strands of hemp, the cable receives its ex- 
ternal protection of eoppor sheathing, 
which consists of four strijjs of the pre- 
pared copper, laid helically, one strip over- 
lapping the other for one-half its breadth. 
In consequence of the strip being previ- 
ously prepared, the cable comes out nice 
and smooth, and coils most readily, being 
exceedingly flexible and easily managed. 
The strips of copper are soldered into con- 
tinuous lengths, care being taken that no two 
joints be allowed within a certain distance 
of each other." 



Combined Ant and Steam Engine. — 
We find in Engineering the following de- 
scription of Warsop's engine, lately tested 
at Nottingham : ' ' The engine being started 
by steam in the ordinary manner, a single- 
acting air pump, worked from the crank- 
shaft, compresses air to a little more than 
the boiler pressure, the air thus passing 
through a long circuit of straight and 
coiled pipe, which traverses the exhaust 
pipe, makes several spiral coils in the chim- 
ney, then descends at one side of the fire- 
box, exposed to the full fire, and finally con- 
nects with a valve-box, through which the 
air, more or less heated, enters the boiler 
at the bottom of the water space. So far 
as the experiments — carefully made upon 
an imperfect engine, worked alternately 
with steam alone and with steam and air — 
can be taken as establishing a principle, 
they indicate a considerable economy — an 
economy, however, beyond anything which, 
as yet, is inferable from theory." 

Photogeaphio Seals. — The Journal of 
Applied Chemistry describes an application 
of Woodward's photographic process, — of 
which we have already made mention, — by 
which a Freiberg photographer prepares 
seals and stamps bearing the likeness of 
his customers. A thin layer of gelatin sen- 
sitized with bi-chromate of potash is ex- 
posed to the action of light under a photo- 
graphic positive by which the parts acted 
upon are rendered insoluble in water. The 
gelatin film is immersed in water, and the 
parts not acted upon by light swell up, 
and we obtain a picture in relief, of which 
a plaster cast can be taken. A galvano- 
plastic copy being taken of the cast we 
have a metallic fac-simile of the photo- 
graph, which can be employed as a seal. 
The journal above named says: " It sug- 
gests a method for obtaining perfect like- 
nesses of persons in metallic cliches for the 
printer, and also an admirable way of illus- 
trating scientific books." » ■ 



Steed vs. Ieon. — The railroad from 
Paris to Marseilles is to be entirely relaid 
with steel rails in place of the present iron 
ones. It will require one hundred and 
thirty -seven thousand tons of steel. It is 
expected that instead of four years, the 
present limit of wear in the vicinity of the 
stations, the new rails will last thirty. The 
bridges on the same road will also soon be 
rebuilt of steel. 



Photihihapiiic Papeu.-W. H. Davis 
gives the following in the British Journal 
of Photograpky: "My method for pro- 
paring the surface — is the following for 
direct printing: Take from four to six 
grains of gelatine, soak it in an ounce of 
water for an hour, then molt it gently over 
a fire, using a clean earthen pipkin. When 
fully dissolved, add to it, while yet warm, 
and stirring it gently during the mixing, 
from four to six drachms of a solution of 
lac in methylated spirit, made in tho pro- 
portion of six ounces of spirit to one of lac, 
and digesting it till dissolved. The mix- 
ture of the gelatine and gum lac in spirits 
produces a creamy-looking emulsion, to 
which is added four grains of chloride of 
sodium, or its equivalent of chloride of 
ammonium or barium. When fully dis- 
solved, filter through fine muslin into a 
clean pipkin, and it is ready for use. 

"I apply warm with a il.it camel's-hair 
brush. When tho paper is dry it is ready 
for sensitiziug, which may be done by flo- 
tation on the ordinary printing bath, or by 
brushing on the silver solution. I prefer 
to use the ammonio-nitrate solution 
brushed on. I use forty grains of silver to 
the ounce of water. " 



Smoke. — "The evil begins and ends, — 
says tho Pittsburg Commercial, — with fir- 
ing. Generally speaking, any man who 
has strength sufficient to wield a shovel, 
and wit enough to keep sober, will do for 
a fireman. We have seen one of those, 
called an excellent fireman, set aside by a 
man who understood the art, and who pro- 
duced more steam with two-thirds of the 
fuel and about two-thirds of the labor. 
Having built his fire to the proper bight, 
instead of cramming fresh fuel in in such 
a manner as to keep it black, or in a fitful 
blaze, he managed, with comparatively little 
exercise, to keep it red. The result was, 
the decrease of smoke was as remarkable 
as the saving of fuel. We argue from this 
that one of the first steps toward the pre- 
vention of smoke in this city, and the sav- 
ing of fuel, would be secured simply by 
placing a premium upon firemen who un- 
derstand their business and make it a 
study. " 

Self-Registering Compass. — The "Al- 
bini Compass" keeps a record of the 
course steered by the vessel. The com- 
pass card carries on its under side, and 
near its periphery, a number of types, 
which correspond with those on the upper 
side of the card. A continuous strip of 
paper, moved by clockwork, passes under 
the card at that side which is next the bow 
of the vessel, and between this paper strip 
and the card itself is an inked tape, which 
travels slowly. At frequent regular inter- 
vals the compass card is tilted, so as to 
bring the type which happen to be imme- 
diately above the paper strip at the time 
down upon the inked tape, bringing the 
latter in contact with the paper, and mark- 
ing upon the latter the letters denoting the 
course which the vessel is steering at 
that moment. 



A Thirty-foot Paper Boat. — The Port- 
land Argits says, Walter Brown has a pa- 
per boat, of the Waters' patent, from a 
moflel of his own. This boat is 31% feet 
long, 12 inches wide, and weighs but 22 
pounds. The lightest wooden boat ever 
made of similar dimensions weighed 41 
pounds. The boat is more than four times 
stronger than one of wood. All of it, save 
where the sculler sits, is gas-tight, so that 
in the event of a race sufficient gas may be 
taken into it to reduce its weight to 8 lbs. 



Combined Liquid and Solid Fuel. — ■ 
An English inventor has patented an ar- 
rangement for burning petroleum or other 
liquid fuel in combination with solid fuel; 
the latter being reduced to dust, and blown 
into the furnace. Complete combustion of 
the solid fuel is by this means obtained. The 
liquid is admitted into a jet of air forced 
into the furnace by means of a fan. 

Copal Varnish. — This should be made 
by dissolving one part, by weight, of cam- 
phor, in twelve parts of ether; Then four 
parts of the best copal resin, reduced to 
powder, are added to this in a well-stop- 
pered bottle. As soon as the copal has be- 
come swollen, four parts of strong alcohol, 
and % part of oil of turpentine are added. 
After shaking the mixture, and letting it 
stand for a few hours longer, a thoroughly 
good copal varnish is obtained. — Bollger. 

Writing on Glass. — A solution^of fluor- 
ine of ammonium is recommended as fur- 
nishing a ready means of writing with a pen 
of any kind upon glass, and is especially 
adapted for labeling bottles, cylinder- 
tubes, etc., in the laboratory, as well as 
for marking the degrees upon hydrometers 
and apparatus of similar construction. 



Scientific Progress. 



The August Eclipse. 

Tho total eclipse of tho sun, on the 7th 
of August next, is the only one which will 
be visible in America during the remain- 
der of the present century. As a partial 
eclipse it will be visible all over the north- 
ern parts of tho continent, while the path 
of tho umbra in which tho eclipse will bo 
total is about 113 miles in breadth, enter- 
ing tho United States near tho origin of Milk 
river, longitude 30° W., thonce diagonally 
through Iowa and Illinois, crossing the 
Ohio near Louisville, Ky. ; thence through 
North Carolina, entering the Atlantic just 
north of Beaufort, and ending at sunset in 
the ocean, in latitude 31 deg., 15 min., 2 
sec. N.; and longitude 9 deg., 34 min., (i 
sec. E. In Washington City the umbra 
commences at 5 b. 2 min. p. m., aud ends 
at 9 h. 52 min. p. M. Prof. Hall, of the 
Naval Observatory, and Mr. Joseph A. 
Rodgers, of the Hydrographic Office, left 
Behring's Straits, uuder orders from the 
Navy Department, to take observations in 
that quarter, at which place the eclipse 
makes its advent. Professors Simon New- 
comb, Wm. Harkness, and J. R. Eastman, 
of the Naval Observatory, have been or- 
dered to Iowa, each to take observations, 
acting independent oE one another. Pro- 
fessor Newcomb will take with him the 
largest object glass from the Naval Observ- 
atory he can procure, and search for aster- 
oids between Mercury and the sun. Lev- 
erier thought that a zone of planets existed 
between Mercury and the sun . They have 
never yet been discovered, and no hopes 
are entertained of their discovery, (if they 
exist) , except during a full eclipse. Prof. 
Harkness will make observations with the 
spectroscope. Dr. Curtis, of the army, 
will accompany the observers, taking with 
him the large equatorial from the United 
States Naval Academy, loaned to the Ob- 
servatory by Vice Admiral Porter for pho- 
tographic observations. Prof. Eastman 
will make meteorological observations. 

Dr. C. H. F. Peters, Director of 
Hamilton College Observatory, has organ- 
ized an expedition for taking observations. 
It will be provided with two telescopes, two 
chronometers, and a spectroscope. Des 
Moines, Iowa, has been selected as the 
point of observation. The party will con- 
sist of three, — Dr. Peters, Wm. A. Rogers, 
of the Sheffield Scientific School, and E. 
M. Nail, of INew York. 



Comet Composed of Carbon Vapor. 

In the Proceedings of the Royal Society, 
Mr. Huggins gives an account of his ob- 
servations upon Comet II of 1868. "When 
the light from its head was examined with 
a spectroscope having two prisms of 60°, 
three bright bands were observed. On 
comparing these bands with those of other 
spectra, it was found that they coincided 
exactly with those given under certain con- 
ditions. Thus in 1864, Mr. Huggins had 
observed that when the spark from an in- 
duction coil with leyden jars in circuit, was 
taken in a current of olefiant gas, the spec- 
trum shown coincided with the carbon 
spectrum obtained under other conditions, 
except that no separate, strong lines were 
to be distinguished, and in place of the 
shading composed of fine lines, found in 
what might be called the normal carbon 
spectrum, that for instance of the spark in 
olive oil, an irresolvable nebulous light 
was given. On the 2d of June, 1868, the 
spectrum of the comet was compared directly 
with the spectrum of the spark in olefiant 
gas, and the identity of position and char- 
acter between the bands was then very 
manifest. 

We are thus led to the strange conclusion 
that this comet is conqnosed of luminous 
carbon vapor. Now we know, that to va- 
porize carbon, as we have it within the 
range of experiment, requires heat of great 
intensity and peculiar conditions of 
chemical reaction, as in the case of a 
jet of olefiant gas supplied with air, 
which gives a greenish flame, resolv- 
able into the carbon specrum. How 
any such conditions of temperature as 
those developed by the induction spark 
which produces carbon vapor directly, or 
those of the mixed air and gas flame where 
it is indirectly developed, can subsist in a 
comet, we are at a loss to imagine. This 
mystery, however, does not stand alone, 
for in the case of the gaseous nebulas we 
have a like example of self-luminous gas 
maintaining its luminosity with a simiJar 
absence of adequate cause. It would ap- 



pear possible that some action related to 
phosphorescence or to fluorescence might 
be concerned in this result, but such a eon- 
jocture is unsupported by any evidence of 
similarity between the spectra of bodies ex- 
hibiting these appearances, aud of these 
celestial objects. We can then simply re- 
gard this comet as a vast globe of glowing 
carbon vapor, having a density approach- 
ing that of our atmosphere, maintained in 
its luminous state by forces and conditions 
of which wo havo "absolutely no knowl- 
edge." 



Life a Molecular Property. — " B," in 
the Yale College Courant, after referring to 
Prof. Haeckel's discovery of the organism 
which he named Prologenes, — the simplest 
form of life, a mere drop of living jelly, — 
says: 

" The cell has always been the refugo of 
vitalists; when science has attempted to 
show that the so-called vital force, formerly 
regarded as something mysterious and 
sacred, is nothing but a transmuted sun- 
power, and that its phenomena havo a 
purely chemical and physical origin, the 
objection is instantly urged " neither chemi- 
cal nor physical force has yet produced a 
cell;" the iuferenco manifestly being that 
tho cell is absolutely necessary to the phe- 
nomena of life. But now comes in Haeck- 
el's discovery of an organism which is ca- 
pable of taking solid nutriment like an 
animal, and yet which is absolutely devoid 
of structure — that is to say, of any struct- 
ure except the molecular structure pos- 
sessed by all colloid matter; an organism 
which is not a cell itself, and does not con- 
tain either cells or nuclei 1 Well does 
Prof. Huxley remark: 'Its existence proves 
life to be a molecular property, and shows 
that organization is the product of life, not 
life the product of organization.' If the 
properties of water may be properly said 
to result from the nature and disposition 
of its component molecules, I can find no 
intelligible ground for refusing to say that 
the properties of protoplasm result from 
the nature and disposition of its molecules." 

Telegraph Wires During Auroral Dis- 
plays. — In reference to the currents pro- 
duced in the wires during auroral exhibi- 
tions, The Journal of The Telegraph, says: 
' 'Although there are, unquestionably, large 
masses of electric clouds sailing in the up- 
per regions of the air during the presence 
of these displays, yet the fact that all, or 
nearly all, interference form the currents 
then exhibited can be prevented by simply 
using two wires instead of the earth and 
wire, proves that these currents are caused 
by a disturbance of the earth's electrio 
state. Its ordinary electric tension is dis- 
turbed, and its currents are, so to speak, 
scattered by this induced current from the 
vast masses of electricity in the sky, but 
are ever seeking to restore themselves to 
their normal condition; thus causing tem- 
porary electric currents of great power and 
rapid changes of tension. Thus they en- 
ter a wire from one earth connection in 
this effort at restoration, and are chased 
ack by another current from the opposite 
end, exhibiting the violent and changeful 
currents which mark these magnetic storms. 
The earth, itself, is a great reservoir of 
electricity, offering no sensible resistance 
to the entrance of electrical currents, yet 
varying in its electric tension at different 
points. This causes an almost ceaseless 
action of the currents, and at almost all 
times they can be felt upon the wires which 
they use to effect the equalization. Dur- 
ing the auroral displays this action is ex- 
cessive. At the same time it can scarcely 
be regarded as incorrect to say that it is 
the induction of vast volumes of electricity 
from the upper air which causes these cur- 
rents; and as a line can be worked by any 
polarity, provided the wire is worked with 
a like polarity, the changing currents do 
not prevent the line from being operated 
during the violent contest for the suprem- 
acy of the one current or the other. " 

Nature op Comets. — M. Bionne has sub- 
mitted the following opinion upon the na- 
ture of comets to the Academy of Sciences: 
' 'Comets are bodies which describe spirals 
originating in a nebula terminating in the 
sun; each spiral maybe considered as an 
ellipse. Formed of the incandescent mat- 
ter of the nebulas, comets would appear to 
be tho regulators of the grand movement 
of celestial bodies, the agents of that vast 
transformation of calorific work into me- 
chanical work, and would come at the end 
of their course to lose themselves in the at- 
mosphere of the sun, to which they would 
serve as an aliment." 



36 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 17, 1869. 



ipttmjg; and Jat^ning, 



The Fowler Steam Plow. 

The only steam plow which appears to 
have met with any marked success in' En- 
gland, is that invented by Mr. John Fowler, 
of Leeds, which is constructed upon the 
principle of a direct pull upon the imple- 
ment, as in ordinary plowing. This plow 
is constructed in gangs, and is dragged 
across the field by a locomotive engine, 
which is moved along one side of the field. 
An "anchor," or vehicles with sharp 
wheels cutting deep into the ground, is 
moved upon the opposite side. An endless 
wire rope is passed from the engine over a 
pulley on the " anchor," and back to the 
engine. The plow is attached to this rope, 
and dragged from the engine to the pulley, 
there reversed, and brought back to the 
engine. It is a balance plow, supported 
on two wheels in the center — one set of 
plows taking the ground when going one 
way, and the other set when going the 
other way, balancing upon the axle between 
the two wheels as a pivot. The engine and 
anchor are moved ahead with each trip of 
the plow. The cost of one of these plows 
is from §8,000 to §10,000. 

One of these plows was received in this 
country, some three years ago; and so im- 
portant was the enterprise , considered, as 
leading the way to the introduction of 
steam plowing in the United States, that 
the duties on the plow were remitted by es- 
pecial act of Congress. This plow is now 
in successful operation on the sugar plan- 
tation of Mr. H. E. Lawrence, about forty 
miles below New Orleans. It turns the 
soil, when required, to the depth of from 
12 to 14 inches; and two hands are suffi- 
cient for its management. 

In addition to the plow there is also a 
scarifier or cultivator, designed for light 
■work; an extra strong grubber, for eradi- 
cating roots and stones, and a harrow; the 
two former being constructed, like the 
plow, as balance machines. There is also 
a subsoil plow connected with this inven- 
tion, which will enter a stiff clay soil to 
the depth of from two to twenty-five 
inches — six in a gang — with coulters hav- 
ing palms as large as a man's hand. 

An interesting trial of one of these ma- 
chines was made about a year ago on a 
large farm of 32,000 acres, belonging to 
Col. W. C. Patterson, near Burlington, 
N. J., and in the presence of the Commis- 
sioner of Agriculture, and numerous other 
gentlemen largely interested in agricul 
ture. The trial was continued for several 
days, and gave very general satisfaction. 
This plow has been used there for some 
two years. The one employed consists of 
twelve plows — six working in a gang, and 
is driven by two 14-horse-power engines, 
one working at each side of the field, instead 
of using an anchor on one side. The 
length of furrow is sixty rods; breadth 
oultivated at one movement, 6% feet; depth 
eight inches. Erom 18 to 25 acres, accord- 
ing to the nature of the ground, can be 
plowed in twelve hours. 

There is another of these plows at work 
upon a Western farm, the looality of which 
we are not acquainted with. It may not 
be out of plaoe to state that the principle 
upon which this machine is constructed 
was first applied to an American invention 
more than thirty years ago. 

Arboriculture, scientifically pursued, 
is one of the most pleasing occupations 
which man can follow. In the latest pub- 
lished report of the British Association for 
the Advancement of Science, it is stated 
that even in that cleared country, trees oc- 
cupy one-twenty-second part of its entire 
area; that to every eleven acres of culti- 
vated land there is one covered with wood, 
and one acre to every sixteen uncultivated. 
The gross annual value of the wood crop 
is estimated to rise up to §12,500,000. 



A California Dairy. 

A Monterey correspondent of the Bul- 
letin describes a dairy in the Salinas valley, 
belonging to Mr. C. S. Abbott, where nine 
hundred cows are milked. This dairy is 
only about three years old; is described as 
being laid out and conducted on the most 
approved system, and is said to be a com- 
plete success. 

If the description is correct, this is prob- 
ably the second dairy, in point of extent, 
in the United States. The locality of the 
first we have not just now at hand, but 
what has heretofore been pronounced the 
second in size, belongs to O. E. Leser & Co. , 
and is located a few miles back of the city 
of St. Louis. As there are only 800 cows 
milked at that establishment, it must stand 
behind our big California dairy; which, in 
all probability, is the second in point of 
size in the Union. 

It is one of the most incomprehensible 
things connected with the agricultural in- 
terests of this coast, that we should import 
even a single pound of butter from the 
Eastern States — much more that we should 
receive from that source over one-half of 
all we consume. During the past week 
no less than 1,794 firkins of Eastern butter 
have reached this city, from New York, by 
steamer; while over 60 tons additional, have 
beenreceived atSacramento,byrailroad, for 
Chicago. Why is it that one of the finest 
grazing regions in the world cannot furnish 
its own butter, when the producers are 
protected by a transit of over 2,000 miles of 
railroad in one direction, and more than 
5,000 miles of steamship carriage in the 
other? 

"We trust that the enterprise of Mr. Ab- 
bott will serve to convince our farmers that 
there is money to be made in every well con- 
ducted dairy that may be properly estab- 
lished on this coast, until the aggregate 
supply exceeds the entire demand for but- 
ter and cheese, this side of the Bocky 
mountains. 



A New Agricultural Section. — The 
Oregon Farmer learns from a private letter 
that " a party of three men recently made a 
prospecting trip into the interior of Clat- 
sop County in search of minerals. They 
did not discover any thing of that kind 
which they believed to be valuable, but 
they found some very good country for 
settlement. One of the party, through 
whom we received this information, has 
resided in Clatsop county for twenty-five 
years. There is. very little yet known of 
the interior of the county." Clatsop is the 
extreme northwestern county of Oregon, 
lying on the south side of the mouth of 
the Columbia and bordering some 35 
miles on that river, and about the same 
distance on the Paoific Ocean. 



A Canvas Corral. — The Oregon Union- 
ist describes, as follows, something quite 
novel, and which, under some circum- 
stances, must be of great advantage to 
sheep-growers: " The Salem Bag Factory 
has brought out a canvas sheep corral. 
The enclosure made by the oanvas is 150 
feet square, and 3% feet high. The herd- 
ers will carry this with them, and when 
night comes, they stretch it and drive the 
herd into it. It is estimated that a pen of 
one hundred and fifty feet square will hold 
a thousand sheep." 

Grafting Potatoes. — The latest nov- 
elty in the fancy line upon the farm is 
grafting potatoes. The mode of operation 
is as follows: — Take one of each variety, 
the good qualities of which it is wished to 
combine; with a pocket knife cut all the 
eyes clearly out of one of them, and sub- 
stitute in their places the eyes cut out of 
the other. The eyes to be inserted should 
be sprouted and cut in the same shape and 
size in (he other potato; they are held in 
place by hair-pins, and bound with bass 
matting or twiue. The fit must be exact, 
and the rind of each must just meet. The 
grafted potatoes are then' to be planted. 
As some of the grafts may fail, it is well to 



operate on a dozen or more sets at a time. 
The produce of these grafted potatoes are 
to be kept separate and planted out the 
following year, when their qualities will 
be proved. Many varieties will some- 
times result from grafting only two kinds 
into each other, and the results are said to 
have astonished the originator of the sys- 
tem, as two reds ' 'have produced a white 
potato." Kidneys and rounds grafted into 
each other produced rounds, mottled and 
kidneys, differing from both parents. 

Cows, Horses and Sheep fed on Fish. 

Farmers on the shores of the State of 
Maine have taught their sheep to live on 
fish. They report to the Agricultural So- 
ciety that a single fish makes a meal for a 
sheep; that it is eaten with relish; that it 
fattens and keeps the animal in fine condi- 
tion. Nothing is said of the effect pro- 
duced upon the wool or the flavor of the 
meat; which the latter we suspect to be no 
improvement. Nor is any remark given 
on chewing the cud. To many stomachs, 
mutton in its best estate tickles the wrong 
way. We are not squeamish, but carniv- 
erous mutton would need a deul of saucing 
to grease the incline to our bread-basket. 
Excliange. 

The above, printed under the head "New 
Food for Sheep," which is going the 
rounds of the press, may be new to the 
stoek^growers of the United States; but it 
is an ancient and very common practice in 
some portions of the world, where grass 
is particularly scarce. Fraser, in his ( 'Trav- 
els," notes the fact, and says that in some 
portions of Western Asia, fish forms the 
chief article of food, not only for sheep, 
but for cows and horses, as well. The 
fish are dried, pounded and sparingly 
sprinkled with salt. The cows become 
very fond of such food; which is often 
mixed with other substances, sometimes 
with pounded date stones. The natives as- 
sert that the flavor of the milk is not at 
all injured by this diet; but that the cows 
drink much water and thereby greatly in- 
crease the quantity, without in the least 
diminishing the quality. Sheep and 
horses thrive equally as well as the cows. 

What the effect may be upon the flavor 
of the meat, we are not told. We should 
suppose, however, that the mode of mix- 
ing water with the milk, indicated above, 
would be much preferable to that so 
greatly employed in this country. 

California Grain to Europe. — It is 
mentioned, by the Eastern papers, as a 
singular fact that California is able to send 
grain to Liverpool cheaper than any State 
of the Mississippi Valley. The chief rea- 
son why wheat can be produced cheaper 
here arises from the fact that the average 
yield in California is about double the yield 
per acre of the Western States ; while , the 
cost of taking 30 bushels from an acre is 
but a trifle more than that for planting and 
harvesting 15 bushels. H our farmers 
would, by careful cultivation, increase our 
average yield per acre, as they might do 50 
per cent, over that at present realized, the 
clear profit to growers would be increased 
fully one-half of that per cent. 

The Government Agricultural Report 
eor May and June, shows a high average 
condition of wheat throughout the country, 
while other grains are also promising well. 
The corn crop is not so flattering. The 
cotton crop, it is thought, will be so much 
increased as to materially affect the price. 
The good weather, of late, has produced a 
wonderful and most favorable change in 
the prospect of this crop. The prospects 
of the fruit crop, are also, as a general 
thing, favorable. The American Agricul- 
turist, generally well informed on such 
matters, expresses substantially the same 
opinion in its July issue. 

A New Potato Growing from an Old 
One. — A correspondent of the American 
Agriculturist, sends to that paper, from 
Virden, III., an old potato, with a new po- 
tato growing from its side. That paper 
says such a thing is nothing new; but 
often occurs when potatoes are kept suffi- 
ciently warm to start into growth, and are 
kept perfectly free from light. 



Items in Brief. 

The Wheat Market. — California Wheat 
was quoted in Liverpool, on Saturday last, 
at 10s. 8d. — about four cents higher, per 
cental than last previous report. Wheat 
growers will do well to watch, closely, the 
European quotations. 

Wheat Exports. — Our Wheat exports 
for the past three years may be stated, in 
round numbers, as follows, commencing 
with 1866-67 : 5,100,000 centals; 5,050,000 
centals; 5,750,000 centals. It may now be 
safely asserted that the exports for 1869-70 
will materially exceed the latter amount. 

Wheat on the Banks. — Large quantities 
of wheat are said to be waiting upon the 
banks of the interior rivers, and elsewhere, 
for transportation to this city. 

Tall Oats. — Mr. Fairfield, Superintend- 
ent of the Bound Valley Beservation, is 
raising a species of oats, unlike anything 
hitherto seen in this region. The stalks 
are seven feet high, three quarters of an 
inch in diameter, with laterals two feet 
long. The heads measure from two to three 
feet on the stalk. The seed was received 
from the Patent Office. 

Tall Wheat. — They are raising wheat 
on the Panay Banch, near San Diego, six 
feet high, with large plump berries ; 600 acres 
of wheat it is thought will average 45 bush- 
els to the acre. This, it should be recol- 
lected, is in a region which has hitherto 
not been considered very favorable for 
wheat growing. ' 

New Melon Seed.— Dr. Holden, of Stock- 
ton, has received some melon seed from the 
Agricultural Department, said to be choice 
and new. They came to hand too late for 
planting this season. A variety known as 
the Ionian melon, was purchased abroad 
for the Department at a cost of $120 per 
pound. Our consuls in all parts of the 
world, are especially active at this time in 
their inquiries for new and valuable varie- 
ties of seeds and plants, for transmission to 
Washington, from whence they are distri- 
buted through the country. 

Good Yield. — A field of barley has been 
harvested, on the Honecut, which yielded 
48 bushels to the acre. 

Sale of Barley. — Some 200 tons of new 
barley was sold at Sacramento, on the 3d 
inst. for §1.02 per cental. 

Apricots, measuring T% inches, 'have 
been raised in the Chico Farm orchard. 

Eoses on Apple Trees. — An Illinois 
horticulturist grows roses on apple trees. 

Mountain Strawberries. — A resident of 
Nevada City has received §140 for strawber- 
ries, raised upon a piece of ground 100 feet 
square, in one month. 

Mountain Grazing. — Large droves of 
stock are being driven into the mountains, 
in all directions, on account of the scarcity 
of food on the plains. 

Flax in Santa Cbuz County. — The Wat- 
sonville Pajaronian of June 7th says: " Pe- 
ter Storm, who lives just outside the town 
limits, has a field of sixty-five acres planted 
to flax, which is growing finely, and will 
give a large yield of seed and straw. Mr. 
Storm has contracted to sell all of his flax 
straw at §50 per ton to the San Lorenzo 
Paper Mills, and other parties have agreed 
j to take all the seed raised at four cents per 
pound. One acre of land will yield from 
two and a half to three tons of straw, and 
about 1,800 pounds of flax-seed. Thus it 
will be seen that flax -raising is much more 
profitable than wheat growing. 

BrPENTNG Wines by subjecting them to 
a high temperature has been tested by a 
number of Los Angeles grapegrowers, and 
in every instance has proved successful. 
Mr. Keller maintains a temperature of 
about 130° in his wine house, by keeping 
fires burning constantly for months. The 
improvement in wine so treated is so 
marked as to leave no room to doubt that 
in one year ripening is advanced equal to 
four or five years by the ordinary let-alone 
way. 

A Large Cucumber. — The longest en- 
cumber, says the Sutter Banner, we ever 
saw was shown to us a few days since by 
Mr. E. B. Eeed, which measured three feet 
and six inches in length, and seven inches 
in circumference. 



Ozone — The Great Coil. — The coil, is 
probably destined to throw new light upon 
scientific research, and to solve the prob- 
lem — what is ozone ? In reference to the 
amount of this element, and the density at 
which it may be produced, very few ex- 
periments have as yet been made. But 
enough is seen in tlie extraordinary red- 
dening effect of the flame of the spark on 
litmus paper, to show that we are likely 
very soon to solve the ozone problem. — 
Mechanics 1 Magazine. 



Jolt 17, 1869.] 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



37 



Stock Sevtew. 



Weekly Stock Circular. 

By Associated Brokers of the 8. F. Stock and Exchange Board 

S*« Francisco, July 17, 1800. 
Financial. 

The monetary pi lioL has obtained in our local 

market fur tin* ]>uM thtve au'i)tli£ may bu saitl to bovfl 
i Had away. Honey is obtainable in bank at 
1@1M percent, per month. The payment of the half- 
yearly dividend* by the Savings aud Loan Institutions, 
^mounting to over $soo,tKHj, has made money easy among 
the depositing classi B i while the Beenrement of s< vera) 
millions in England, at British rates, Bay 4 per cent, per 
annum— hire worth 10@12 per cent.— will afford the 
I'iu'iliti.-. tn iu. .v< Ih-' ini'tniiiiiK In-avy crops. 

In «il other r es pe c ts the financial horizon huebei □ meas- 
urably freed from the clouds lately hovering above it, 
and preventing clear observations forftjtuxe guidance. 
Tlu- Ix'ultliv monetary condition of the interior may be 
considered a n flex of the Improved condition which has 

taken place in tin- metropolis. The .Sacramento Savings 
Bank recently declared a dividend of one per cent, per 
month, amount lug to about $75,000, for the six months 
cinhd July 1st; but the depositors, with one accord, 
declined drawing their dividends, leaving them to be 
added i" the principal; In addition to which, fresh de- 
posits amounting to about $10,500 wore mnde on the 
Baxuo day. This one Incident sufficiently demonstrates 
the favor with which BavingB und Loan Societies axe 
received In California, and indicates an early and marked 
extension of their beneficial effects to other towns and 
places in the State, where their presence is needed. 

Government now has, locked up in the vaults of the 
Assistant Treasurer, in San Francisco, the handsome 
Uttlfi sum Of (18,000,000 ; and we desire to call attention 
to a gross piece of neglect toward its employes on this 
coast. This is the third month since the Custom House 
offlolala have received any pay. The majority of them 
are by no means in a condition to wait for so long a 
period. Their salaries, at beat, are not adequate to the 
amount or importance of the work performed. There is 
no better regulated institution of the kind in the Union ; 
none in which more system and order are observed ; and 
it Is "wrong. Inexcusable, that the employes should be 
compelled to part with their pay accounts at a loss of 
from 5 to 10 per cent., in order to subsist. Most of them 
are gallant and meritorious officers of the late Volunteer 
Army, and have demonstrated their devotion to country 
on many a sanguinary field. They deserve and should 
have more efficient recognition. "Were the Treasury bare 
of money, the case would be different ; but with 
$1.1,000,000 idle in this city, the neglect appears inexcus- 
able. We trust that Mr. Boutwell will give the matter 
early and efficient attention. 

The Branch Mint closed on the JOth inst., to make a 
settlement, and will reopen Bhortly under the new 
direction. 

Bullion is in rather short supply, with a more active 
demand than at the date of our last issuo. Gold bars are 
quotable at 870@875. Silver bars are at par. Currency 
bills on Atlantic cities pay 34$£@343i per cent, premium 
on gold. Coin drafts pay l!i@l^ per cent, premium. 
Telegraphic transfers, lj^@13i per cent, premium. 
Sterling exchange, 48?.id. Commercial exchange, 49j£d. 
There are no Mexican dollars in market. Gold in New 
York, July loth, 1363S; Legal Tenders with us, 74}$® 
73 34. 

City Stocks. 
We have to report a continued dullness in the miscel- 
laneous share market. Sales of Spring Valley Water stock 
■were made at $(S4<g}C4 75, and San Francisco Gas at $80 

per share The California Steam Nav. Co. disbursed 

their usnal dividend of 1 per cent, per month on the 15th 
inst. . . .The California Insurance Co. disburse a dividend 
of 2 per cent, per month for tho quarter ending June 

30th The Union Insurance Co. pay 1 per cent, per 

mouth for the three months just closed. Their total as- 
sets are stated to be $1,012,766, and the net surplus, after 
allowing for re- insurance and other claims. $141,961. .. . 
The Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. paid a dividend of 1 
per cent, per month on the 15th inst. for the quarter 
ending June 30th: and the Home Mutual Insurance Co. 
will pay a dividend of 1 per cent, on their capital stock 

on the 20th iust The Bank of California announce 

their usual dividend of 1 per cent, for the present month. 
The Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank of Savings disburse 
a dividend of 10 per cent, per annum, free of Federal 
tax, for the first six months of the current year.... On 
the 15th inst. the Omnibus Railroad Co. paid its usual 
monthly % per cent, dividend ...The State Telegraph 

Co. paid a dividend of $1 per share on the 15th The 

French Savings Bank has declared a dividend of 11 per 
cent, per annum for the six months just closed, payable 
on and after the 19th inst. 

Mining SJiaa-e Marlcet. 
The mining share market haB been somewhat less ac- 
tive during the past week, but the number of stocks 
dealt in proved equally as large as heretofore. In a 
number of instances prices have been well maintained, 
while others show a slight recession, and altogether the 
market may be considered ess firm as compared with 
the transactions of the previous week. Very considera- 
ble soles of White Pine stocks have been effected in the 
open market, showing that increased interest is taken in 
this class of securities. 

Chollak-Potosi — attracted increased attention at fair 
prices. From the annual report for the fiscal year end- 
ing May 31st, we learn that the company extracted 44,900 
tons of ore, giving an average yield of $23 70 per ton, 
the cost of extraction, reduction, etc., being $21 09, leav- 
ing a net profit of $2 01 per ton. We condense the fol- 
lowing statement of receipts and expenditures from the 
Secretary's report: 

RECEIPTS. 

Bullion $1,152,303 37 

Ores sold 29. 989 33 

Premium on bullion 2.849 22 

Superintendent's account 3,074 37 

Sundries 2.84-1 50 

Cash oa hand per last statement 110,1-18 35 

$1,301,210 14 



kkpjuwitobb 

Dividend ftHjSSB 00 

Labor _>,-.. 

HArdware. etc 34 II I Jl 

Timber and Lumber M.Q38 08 

1 Iran i 10,953 ii 

Bedaeins Ore 638 W8 r, 

Tuei ana r I pei . - 9,138 m 

TVackee Uailruml '.. ■ 

7,213 tl 

Assaying n.m: v> 

Material* ii.193 87 

25,088 30 

L'aab on hand at date. 168,1 | 

51.301.210 14 

During the wee* ending July 9th. 1,410 tons of ore 
wore extracted, against 1,060 the previous week. Of the 
above amount 070 tons came from the Blue Wing stopo, 
and 460 from the New Tunnel developments. The foces 
in the Bluu Wing stopes are reported to look promising. 
No change in quality of New Tunnel ore; the average as- 
says from car samples show $72 to the ton. The shares 
of this company have been changed from 2,800 to 28,000, 
and the incorporate value from $2,000 to $10U per share, 
tiKikln.L: ten shares to the foot. 

Overman sold In a limited extent. From the annual 
report closing with June, we learn the following: 

KECEIPTB. 

Bullion '. $358,863 

Ore sold 5,039 

Assessments. 140.260 

Wood ranch account 28,678 

Sundries 5.4-16 

Cash on hand July 1, 1868 52,184 

$590,470 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Reducing ores $290,936 

Labor account 117,01)5 

Wood ranch account 61,416 

Lumber, etc 66.1115 

Salaries 8,321 

Sundries 38,655 

L'uahoo hand July 1, 1869 8.032 

$590,470 

The average yield of 22.2G1 tons of ore reduced during 
the fiscal year was $16 12 per ton. The officers for the 
ensuing year are as follows: M. J. McDonald, President ; 
David Fay, A. Hemme, Louis Vesearia and W. R. Parkin- 
son, Trustees; T.J. Owens, Secretary; Joseph A. Myrick, 
Superintendent. 

Savage — has been exceedingly active during the past 
week. The annual meeting waB held on the 15th inst., 
and from the Secretary's annual report we condense as 
follows: 

RECEIPTS. 

Bullion product $1,949,925 

Premium on sumo 4,875 

Ores sold 15,919 

Tailings, etc- 6,323 

Cash on hand July 1, 1863 106,320 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Dividends $751,575 

Reduction of ores— custom mills 552,836 

Reduction of ores— company's mills ... 145,447 

Labor 284,769 

Salaries of officers 20,022 

Virginia and Truckee Railroad 75,000 

Timber and Lumber 50,549 

Fuel, Wood and Coal 53,636 

Hardware, Candles, etc 26,025 

Assaying v 10,839 

Taxes 19,520 

Sundries 45,749 

Cash on hand July 1, 1809 47,395 

$2,083,362 

$150,000 was subscribed towards the completion of the 
Virginia and Truckee Railroad. The amount of ore on 
hand at the mine July 1, 1868, was 1,683, and on July 1, 
1869, 121 tons. The ore reduced during the year amount- 
ed to 55,479 tons. The amount of ore sold was 15,36)3 
tons. The cost of production and reduction, yield and 
profit of the ore reduced during the past year compares 
as follows with the two preceding years: 
Produc- Reduc— 





tion. 


tion 


Total. 


Yield. 




1866-7 


$7 91 


Sl-I 04 


$21 95 


$11 114 


$19 99 


18(ii-s 


? 21 


13 74 


20 95 


40 84 


19 89 


1868-9 


8 30 


12 22 


21 12 


34 87 


13 75 



The amount of ore reduced in 1866-7 was 69,377 tons ; 
in 1867-8, 84,627 tons, and in 1868-9, 55,479 tons. The 
receipts and disbursements for the past three fiscal years 
compare as follows: 

Cash 
Receipts. Disbursements. on hand, 

1866-7 52,935 875 $2,898,183 $77,716 

1867-8 3,530,834 3,502,230 106,320 

1868-9 1,977,042 2,035,967 47,395 

The monthly dividends disbursed by the company for 
the same yeai-s were as follows: In 1866-7, $880,000; 
1867-8, $1,560,000; 1868-9, $968,000. From date of organ- 
ization the amount of ore taken from the mine has been 
339,808 tons ; reduced, 324,317 tons ; gross receipts in 
bullion and from ore sold, $13,304,740 ; assessments 
levied, $188,000; and dividends disbursed, $4,528,000. 
The available assets of the company at the close of the 
fiscal year were $90,803, against liabilities of $2,655 
The property assets of the company aggregate $256,000, 
as follows; Savage and Atchison mills, $90,000 ; E street 
shaft and works, $150,000; buildings at Virginia, and as- 
say office, $16,000. 

Hale & Noncnoss— was moderately dealt in. For the 
week ending July 10th, 154 tons of ore were extracted 
from the upper miue, and 578% from the lower mine, 
making a total of 732% tons for the week, against 1,321 
tons the previous week. They delivered 644 tons to cus- 
tom mills ; on hand, 2,011 % Imperial levied an as- 
sessment of $5 per share on the 14th inst; office removed 

to No. 20, Hay ward's Building A dispatch to the Daily 

Herald states that it is likely that Yellow Jacket wiU 
levy an assessment of $10 per share after the annual 

meeting, which takes place on the 19th inst Gould & 

Curry is quiet. During the week ending July 12th, 248 
tons of ore were extracted, average assays from car sam- 
ples showing $51 40 to the ton On the 12th inst. the 

Ophdi was in a distance of 428 feet. . . .Kentuck yield of 
bullion for the quarter just closed amounted to $42,684. 

Empire yield of bullion — April, May and June — 

$46,295 Sierra. Nevada reports a bullion yield for 

the quarter just closed of $55,139. The stock has been 
changed from $500 to $200 per share, and the number of 
shares from 3,000 to 15,000, making five shares per foot. 



D«. Hall has just returned from Europe after an absence 
of one year, during which time he has visited England, 
Ireland, France and Germany, and has held consultations 
with the following eminent physicians : Drs. Curling, 
Druit, Lee, Parker, Acton, Aitkcn. Churchill, Ricord, Vel 
peau, Boech, Sperino, and Dewilz. Many of the coses in 
which he held consultation with the above named eminent 
physicians were, we are sorry lo say, those of Americans. 
Americans will not now be under the necessity of leaving 
the Pacific Coast for Medical Treatment, for Dr. HALL has 
brought with him every new mode of treatment known to 
the greatest physicians of the world. To old residents of the 
Pacific Ooa3t it is needless to mention the address; tonew 
oiners, however. It Is necessary to mention that be may 
be found at the American Surgery and Dispensary, 402 
Montgomery street, opposite Wells, Fargo & Co's, San Kran- 
1 Cisco 21vl8-3m 



Weekly Shareholders' Directory, for 
Meetings, Assessments and 
Dividends. 

[Compiled for every Issue, from ailverltst?ments In the 

Mixing Attn SciKDTirio PttKSs aud other San 

Francisco Journals. j 

Comprising the Names of Companies, District or County 
ii .n ; Ariiuum mid tl.it,.- tit" Assessment; Dato ol 
Heating; Dayol Delinquent Sale; and Amount and Time 
ol Payment of Dividends. 

ASSESSMENTS. 
MA.HK, LOCATION, AMOUNT, AND DAT DAT 

BATK OF A93KSSMKNT. DKLINttOKKT. OTSALK 

Alpha Cms. Storey co., Nev., .Tune 5, $5 lulv 10— July 31 

Bbiu Koau, While I'Jrie. Mnv 31, !.c .July lO-AiiRust I 

Bullion, Storey co., Nev. May ■>■>, $10. .1'avuhle Immediately 

Urit-lt, White 1'Hic.June 23, 25c July 20— Sept. 4 

Central. Storey en , Nov., .In tic 23. $2.6J. ...Julv 24— Aug 14 
I'.i-iiila. Mexico, June Ht, $1.25 lulv 21— Auk 12 

German I a, White Pino, July 13,20c An^. l.i-Auc. 26 

Cons Chloride Plat, w. P., May 28. Si July 7— July 23 

Cherokee Hat, Butte en., June 28, $5 Aug. B— Aug "" 

Chester, White Pine, Juno 20. 15c ....Aup. i— Aujt. '-'.'1 

Cnl.ii Cons.. White fine. June 24, 6c .....lulv 24— Aug 

Cayuga Chief, White Plr.o, June 23, luc July ao-Aup. 10 

Daney, Lyon Co.. Nev., May 29, $1.60 lulv I— July 19 

Daniel Webster, White l'im\ June 3M. Iftc.lulv 3D— Am.'. 10' 
Evening Slur, White Pine, June 2,\ 10c... Jul v :il— Any. 21" 

Cold Hill Q., Storey en., .June 29. $1 Aug. 2- Am: 23 

Geo. Washington, white Pine, July I, 10c. Aug. 12 -Aug. 26* 
Hidden Treasure, While Pine, June 29, 50c. Aur. i— auk. 25 

HopoUravcl. Nevada co , June 29, $1 Autf. 7— Aim. 2:( 

Inn, White Pine, July 14, 10c Auk. I9-Se»t. 24 

I XL, Alpine co , May 10. $1 60 June 26— July 26' 

Imporlal. storey co.. Nov.. July 14, $5 Aug. 18— Sept. 8 

Julia, Storey co., Nev. May 27. GO June 20-.Iuly 17 

Kentuck, Storey co., Nev., Juno 14, $11). July 1.1— Aug. 3 

Muzepna, White Pine. June 3H, 10c Aug. 5— S«pt 11 

Mngonta, WhllePinc, June 21. 10c July 29-Sept .4 

MahoKBiiv, White Pine. Juno 17, 10c July 23— Aug. 13 

Mammoth Cave, White Pine, July 12, ltic.Aug. 19-Sept. 23 

Noonday, White Pine. June H,3iic July 19— Aug. 9 

Nnrili Slur, Nevada co., June 4. $20 July 9— Julv 3u* 

North Star. White Pine. .May 12, 7^c June 18— July 17 

Plnehe, White Pine. April 6, 15c ' lime 30— July 30 

Phoenix, White Pine, July 12, 15c Aug 12-Sept 39 

Rnthliuii, White Pine. June 22, SI July 27--AUC. 14 

Sliver Moon, While Pine, May 31, fie July 10— August I 

silver Wave, White Pine, June 7, 20c Julv 8— J nl v 28* 

Silver Vault, While Pine, July 1,5c Aug. 7— Aug 28 

Thunderbolt-, White Pine, July 1, 5c Aug. 12 -Aug. 26* 

Virginia. While Pine. June 17, $1.25 July 26- Aug. 11 

White Pine Water, June 23, SftO Inly 28— Aug 16 

Willtmnnlic, While Pine, May 20. 20c lulv 19 -Aug 10* 

West California, White Pine, July 111, 10c... Aug. 17— Sept. 25 

Well.«, White Pine. June 4 Sale July 23 

Yosetuitc, Humboldt co., Nev,, July 2, 50c Aug. 7— Aug. 21* 
MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 

Alleghany, Sierra co Annuil Meeting July 26 

Uromide l'u ime , White P.ne Annual [Meeting July 26 

Chieftain, Whlu- Pine Annual neeiiny July 22 

Cheater, White Pine Annual Meeting July 3D 

(lenrge Washiugion, While Pino.. .Annual Meeting July 23" 

Minerva, White Pine Annual Meeting July 19 

North Virginia Annual Meeting July 19 

Pogonip Flat, White Pine Annual Meeting July 19 

Hi upon. Alpine co Meeting Julv 19 

San Fernando Tunnel, White Pine. Annual Meelinp Aug. 2* 

Sedge! V". White Pine Annual Meeting Aug. 2* 

Thunderbolt, While Pine Annua Meeting July 23* 

White Cloud, White Pine Annual Meeting Aug. 2' 

Yellow Jacket, Store v co., Nev Annual Meeting July 19 

LAST DIVIDEND. 

Amador Co., div. $S per share Payable July 3, 1869 

Alpha Cons . Storey co., Nev , div. $2.. ..Pay. June 19, IS-iS 

Biicon, Storey co., Nev., div Payable June 19, 1868 

Coney, preferred ritoclc, div. 1}£ percent May 10, 1869 

Crown Point, dividend, $7.50 Payable Sept. 12, 1863 

Chollnr Potosi, div., $20 Payable July 7, 1869 

Eureka, div. $5 Payable July 10, 1869' 

Empire M. & M.. Nov.. dividend S6. ...Payable May 15, 1867 

Gould A Curry, div.. S7. 50 Payable May 15,1867 

Gold Hill Q M & M-dlvidend, $7 50. ...Payable July 13, 1868 

Golden Chariot, Idaho, div. $3 Payable June 15, 1869 

Golden Rule. Tuolumne co, div. 60c $ sh..Puv. June 26, 1869 

Hale & Norcross, div. $6 Payable July 10, 18(>9 

Imperial, storey co., Nev., div Payable June 20, 1868 

Industry. White Pine, rtiv.,$t Payable July 1, 1869 

Keystone, Sierra co , div., $32 Pavable May 6, 1869 

Kentuck, div.. $20 per share .....Payable Jan. 10,1869 

North Star, dividend, $5 Payable Aug. 15, 1868 

Occidental, div. $2 Payable March 2, 1869 

Pacific Unassessable, div Payable June 18, 1868 

Sand Spring -alt, dividend $1 Payable Jan. fi, 1869 

Santiago, Silver City, dividend, $2 50... Payable Dec 19, 1868 
Savage, Virginia, Nev, dividend, $4. ..Pavable May 11,1869 
Sand Springs Salt, Virginia, div., $1 ...Puyable May 5, 1869 
Sierra Nov., Storey co.. Nev., div. $2. 50.... Pay. July 10, 1869 
Virginia AG. H Water Co.". Dividend, payable April 16, IHC9 
Yellow Jacket, div., $5 Payable March 15, 1869 

Those marked viith an asterisk (*) are advertised in this 
journal. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Coal OU, V gallon 45 <a 471^ 

Candles. 9 B> 16 9 its 

Kaiich Butter. "$ lb 35 a 38 

Isthmus Huiter, r ' It* SO @ S5 

Cheese. California, e* B> 15 @ 17 

Egga, jftdoasii 35 @ 42« 

-" ' .' "' 13 @ 17 

Ham and Bacon, $ lb 1* Z m 

Shoulders, 54 U, 7 @ 8 

Kct»ll Prices. 

Batter, canrornin, fresh. 9 lb 45 @ 60 

do. pickled, 91b 3d © - 

do. Oregoii, V' If. 20 ^ 25 

do. NowYorV,*Ub 35 @ 40 

Cheese, ri lb 20 @ 25 

gonoy, «i ib 25 @ 30 

? Kt M£3? zon 60 @ 65 

Lard, £ ib is @ 20 

Hums and Bacon, "$ lb 20 a 26 

Cranberries*, ft gallon 1 tm a 1 26 

Potatoes, ^. It, : Hi® 2 

Potatoes, Sweet, 3S lb _" ^ — 

Tomatoes. $ lb B § w 

ub, » lb 5 @ 8 

Apples, No. 1, » lb 4 % I 

Pears, Table, » lb 6 a " 

{:i"'.y, dried. fMb W I ,2 

Pearlies, dried, 9 B» , 10 @ 18 

Oranges ,« dozen 60 @ 60 

Lemons, 8 dozen _ @ 1 m 

Chickens, apiece 75 *a 1 00 

Turkeys, « lb 30 @ 35 

Soup, Pale andC. 7 @ 12 

Soap, Caul lie, ^ lb )g @ 20 

Companj> 2 transactions. 



Latest Stock Prices Bid and Asked. 

8. F. STOCK AKO EXCHANGE BOARD 

Fridat Evening, July 16, If 
MINING STOCKS— WASHOE DISTRICT. 

Alpha 25 

Baltimore American — 

Belcher 23 

Bullion. G. H 15 

Crown Point 51 

Cole(Va.> — 

Contidence 40 

Consolidated Virginia — 

Chollar-Potosi 26^ 

Daney 2% 

Exchequer 11 

Empire Mill and alining Co (ill 

Gould&Curry Ill 

Gold Hill Quartz 53 

Hale A Norcross I<7 

Imperial 68 

1..P.O . 11' 



Julia. . 



l.'j 



Justice aod Independent 

Kentuck mi 

Lady Bryan 45 

American 16% 

Occidental 18 

Oplilr 2.1 

Overman 80 

Segregated Belcher 9 

Savage 89% 

Sierra Nevada 8% 

Union — 

United States — 

Sellow Jacket 53 

MISCELLANEOUS MINING STOCKS. 

Amador (California) 285 

Aurora, White Fine la 

Eureka, (California) — 

Golden Chariot (Idaho) 35 

Silver Cord (Idaho) 6 

Golden Rule. Calltorula 10 

Mohawk (California) — 

Pocollllo, White l*inc....; Z% 



San Francisco Market Kates. 

"Wholeanle Price. 

Friday, July 16, 1869. 

Flour, Extra, ft hbl 54 75 @$5 50 

Do . Supcrtine @ 4 50 

Corn Meal, -n>, lUtl lbs 2 110 ® 2 25 

Wheat, $100 lbs 1 40 ® 1 70 

Oats, $ 100 lbs 1 50 @ 1 75 

Barley, %i lull lbs 1 15 @ 1 50 

Beans, <fe* 100 lbs 3 60 @ 5 00 

Potatoes, ^ 1U0 lbs — ©115 

Hay.flioli 10 60 (51 1 7 00 

Live Oak Wood, $ cord 9 00 @10 00 

Beef, extra, dressed, $ lb 7 @ 9 

Sheep, on foot 2 50 @ 3 00 

Hogs, on foot, ^ lb 5 @ 7 

Hogs, dressed, fa lb 9 @ 10 

GROCERIES, ETC. 

Sugar, crushed, fl a 14% @ 15 

Do. China 10 @ 11 

Coffee. Costa Rica, ^ lb — @ 20 

Do. Rio — @ 19 

Tea, Japan, ft lb 75 @ 90 

Do. Green 60 ©125 

Hawaiian Rice, $ lb 9% © 10 

China Rice, ft lb b% @ &y 7 



New Incorporations. 

Tide Land Eeclamation Co. — July 
9th. President, A. C. Peachy; "Vice Pres- 
ident, Lloyd Tevis; Treasurer, George D. 
Eoberts; Engineer, E. B. Dorsey; Secre- 
tary, Wm. Doolan. Directors': A. C. 
Peachy, Lloyd Tevis, Geo. D. Eoberts, La- 
fayette Maynard, E. B. Dorsey, S. Heyden- 
felt and John S. Eager. 

Minebal City G. & S. M. Co.— Nev. 
July 9th. Capital stock, $1,000,000. 
Trustees: G. W. Lamb, J. N. Hicks, AM. 
Crow, S. Brannan and W. V. Wells. 

Eosedale S. M. Co.— July 10th. Cap- 
ital stock, $2,400,000, divided into 24,000 
shares. Trustees: Wm. E. Maurice, T. C. 
Oweus, Miles Jewett, Daniel McLeod, Jr., 
C. C. Palmer aud C. E. Kingsley. 

Calenta S. M. Co.— White Pine. July 
13th. Capital stock, $1,200,000, divided 
iuto 12,000 shares. W. Ayers, F. P. 
Sweet, J. D. Sogers and J. G. Hoitt. 

Eailboad M. Co.— July 13th. Capital 
stock, $4,000,000, divided into 40,000 
shares. Trustees: T. G. McLean, D. O. 
McCarthy, James Kellogg, J. H. Cooper 
and J. T. Clough. 

Impkoted Steamboat Wheel Co. — July 
14th. Trustees: N. Heath (President), W. 
L. Palmer (Vice President), J. G. North, 
L. L. Sawyer, J. A. Eaton (Treasurer) , J. 
Armstrong, Jr. (Secretary). 

Sieeba Nevada M. Co. — July 14th. In- 
crease of capital stock from $1,500,000 to 
$3,000,000, divided into 15,000 shares. 

La Plata S. M. Co. — Winnemueca, 
Humboldt County, Nev. Capital stock, 
$4,000,000, divided into 40,000 shares. 
Trustees: J. H. Cooper, T. G. McLean, J. 
P. Clough, D. O. McCarthy and James 
Kellogg. 

Pacific Expbess Co.— July 14th. Cap- 
ital stock, $8,000,000, divided into 80,000 
shares. Trustees: H. D. Bacon, D. O. 
Mills, Lloyd Tevis, Josiah Stanford and 
Louis Cummings. 

Meetings, Elections, Etc. 

Paikmount Land Asso'n. — July 12th. 
Trustees: Charles P. Brown, John Kurtz, 
John W. Shaeffer, Wallace Everson, Wil- 
liam J. Gunn, William Stuart and Joseph 
Brandenstein. 

School House Extension Land Asso'n. 
July 12th. Trustees: W. J. Gunn, C. F. 
Brown, D. S. Bachman, John Kurtz, John 
W. Shaeffer, Joseph Naphtaly and B. L. 
Brandt. 

Kewanee S. M. Co. — White Pine. July 
12th. Trustees: George E. Whiting, The- 
odore A. Mudge, Henry Laiduer, Henry 
Moore and Henry B- Murray. 

Castle Tbact H. A.— July 13th. Trus- 
tees: A. S. Gould (President), George 
Fitch (Vice President), D. Steffens, M. J. 
Hopkins, Thomas Kerr and Peter T. Secu- 
lovich, John E. Wilde, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

Savage M. Co.— July 14th. Trustees: 
S. W. Glazier, J. D. Fry, Thomas Bell, 
A. Hayward and Alpheus Bull. President, 
Alpheus Bull; Secretary, B. B. Holmes; 
Treasurer, W. C. Ealston; Superintendent, 
T. B. Shamp. 

Pacific Insubance Co. — July 14th; 
President, J. Hunt; Vice President, Wil- 
liam Alvord; Secretary, A. J. Ealston; Ma- 
rine Secretary, A. Baird. 



If the type of your evening paper begins to 
look small, dim of indistinct, apply at once to C. 
Mttller, 205 Montgomery street, for a pair of his 
A No. 1 Spectacles. * 



To News Agents, 

From July 1st, 1869, News Agents desiring five or more 
copies weekly of the Mining and Scientific Phess, will 
be furnished direct from tho office, at a reduced price 
from former rates. Orders for a less number can best 
be supplied through San Francisco wholesale agents. 



38 



Ti\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 17, 1869. 



Mininff Summary. 



The following information is gleaned mostly from 
journals published in the interior, in close proximity 
to the mines mentioned. 



California. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

The}Miner condenses a letter from a man 
■who has traveled extensively in South 
America and Mexico, and who recently in- 
spected the Tarshish mine and others in 
Alpine. He prophesies that all the small 
locations will be sooner or later abandoned 
or sold, but the regular organizations, with 
capital will succeed, and this section will 
within five years produce as much silver as 
the State of Nevada in its best days. 

Pennsylvania. — It worked about $7 per 
ton. Such is the reluctant answer we have 
finally obtained to the question, what was 
the bullion result from the ton of Pennsyl- 
vania ore recently sent to Washoe. 

Splendid indications in the Globe tunnel 
this week. 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

The Alta's mining summary for the half 
year, says: The returns of the Amador 
mine for June have not yet been received, 
but the average gross yield had been about 
$63,000 per month from February to May, 
inclusive. At the present rate of produc- 
tion the mine will turn out nearly, if not 
quite, $750,000 for 1869. The production 
for the first five months of this year was 
$47,861.53, $65,670.98, $61,720.65, $66,- 
346.52, and $61,576.70. The number of 
tons reduced averages about 2,950 per 
month, every ton yielding more than $20. 
The dividend for each of the last five 
months was $10 per share. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

Petticoat. — Chronicle, July 10th: Bich 
rock has again been struck in the Petticoat 
and the mill will soon be running. The 
shaft is sunk to the depth of 200 ft. 

Bich Bock. — Fifty tons of rock, taken 
from a lead owned by Mr. Hopper, at Bail- 
road Flat, crushed in Smart's mill, yielded 
93 ozs. 
INYO COUNTY. 

Letter from Independence, June 21st: 
The Kearsarge Co. are working 10 men, 
taking good ore, but will not start their 
mill for some time. Mr. Passmore is now 
running the Silver Sprout mine. He is 
taking out good rock and will start the mill 
about the 6th of July. 

In Cerro Gordo District they are going 
ahead at an astonishing rate. One mine, 
the Ignacio, was sold to-day for $24,000. 
Belshaw & Co. are smelting out from three 
to five tons of crude bullion per week. 
Synipsoii & Co. are getting three tons of 
ore per day to the drifter, and will increase 
the number of drifters to 30. They sell 
their ore to Belshaw & Co. for from $6 to 
$15 a ton. 

Cekeo Gokdo. — From the Los Angeles 
Star, July 10th: Wm. Eakin and Jesse 
Avers arrived last Saturday from Cerro 
Gordo, the former bringing 96 bars of 
metal, weighing three tons. This metal is 
richer than any heretofore brought to our 
city. New mines are being located every 
day, Four new furnaces are nearly com- 
pleted, while there is ore enough, easy of 
attraction, to give employment to 100. 
MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

Hunter's Valley. — Hail, July 9th: Par- 
ties working the Oakes & Beese mine, at 
Hunter's Valley, are about making exten- 
sive improvements. Twelve new stamps, 
and a new engine at the hoisting depart- 
ment, are being constructed — making it a 
28-stamp mill. From 80 to 100 men are 
employed. Work has been recommenced 
on the Floyd vein. The use of the Giant 
powder, coupled with the contract system 
with the miners, makes a wonderful per- 
centage in favor of all parties interested. 

Bunning. — The Mariposa Co'a new 25- 
stainp mill, on the Merced river, is now 
running — making 61 stamps now in opera- 
tion for the company. These mills are 
crushing rock from the Josephine and Pine 
Tree veins, and are operating with the dry 
crushing process. The company has also 
commenced work at the Mariposa mill, run- 
ning 25 stamps. 
NEVADA COUNTY. 

Allison Banch. — Grass Valley National, 
July 6th : Work at this mine is diligently 
prosecuted. The large pumping engine is 
to be removed from the south to the middle 
shatt. Excavations for the foundation have 
been made, and workmen commenced lay- 
ing the stone to-day. The new pole, six- 
teen inch, Cornish pump, will be put in at 
the bob level. Below this will be the four- 
teen inch pump at present in use. Each of 
these pumps has a vertical lift of 160 feet. 
Some excellent rock is being taken out from 



that portion of the mine known as the Cari- 
boo ledge; fully up to the old standard of 
the Allison Banch ore. None has yet been 
crushed. 

Union Hull. — We chronicled last week 
the cleaning up of $4,000 from the plates, 
and yesterday gold to the amount of $10,000 
in addition was brought in. 

Greenhorn. — The lessees have been 
working three months, and had three clean- 
ups, the poorest of which yielded at the 
rate of $16 per ton, exclusive of sulphurets. 
They are down 70 feet on the line of the 
ledge. Bock is being crushed at Laton's 
mill at Union Hill, which is paying $20 per 
ton. There is very little water in the mine. 
Forthe present, all the hoisting is done with 
a windlass, by hand. Two men have taken 
out 45 tons during the last month. The 
ledge is now from five to seven feet in thick- 
ness. It is in contemplation to erect steam 
hoisting works and put up a ten stamp mill. 

Dromedary. — Same of 7th: Parties work- 
ing the main ledge of the Dromedary mine 
on shares, had a crushing yesterday of 
seven tons of rock from the hundred-foot 
level, at the Gold Hill mill, which paid 
$182. The same of 9th says that nine tons 
from the 300 foot level had just yielded 
$440 — $49 per ton. Better rock still, is in 
sight. 

Mutual. — 9th : This mine is four and a 
half miles east of Graniteville. An incline 
shaft, 125 feet in depth has just been com- 
pleted to the tunnel. The shaft is 14 feet 
in diameter in the clear and strongly tim- 
bered. They will start their mill within ten 
days. The ledge is well defined, three feet 
in thickness, and shows well in gold and 
sulphurets. 

Brown's Hill. — Williams & Co. have 
worked most of the time this season. Their 
average clean-up for a two weeks' run is 
$1,509. Brown Bros, have completed, a 
drain tunnel and will start their cement 
mill next week. When the mill is running, 
they clean up from $2,000 to $3,000 per 
week. Neece & West have just completed 
a tunnel, and are now running powder- 
drifts. They will use 200 kegs at a blast. 
The black powder is employed. 

Empire. — Grass Valley Union, July 8th : 
The Empire mine is again going ahead with 
a full working force. 

Same of 13th says : ' ' Up to yesterday 
afternoon the Empire mill had run eight 
and a half days, and cleaned up over 
$19,000, When the night shift were to go 
on, only five pairs of men presented them- 
selves. The assassinations of Saturday 
night had intimidated the others so that 
they would not work. The slungshot and 
the bludgeon rule in this vicinity, and the 
rule seems to be submitted to with a spirit, 
at once meek and inviting more violence. 
Sunday night another man coming from 
the Empire into town was attacked by three 
men, and was compelled to take refuge in 
a house by the roadside, where he remained 
until day-light. Have we any men in this 
community who dare assert themselves as 
on the side of law? If any such there are, 
let them speak, and that too so they will be 
heard." 

Deer^Creek. — Transcript, 9th : There are 
not less than fifteen Chinese companies at 
work, giving employment to between two 
and three hundred of their countrymen. 
There are besides, a company working 
Little Deer Creek and one in Gold Bun. 
White men have worked these over and 
over, and then sold them, at good prices, 
to Chinese companies, who appear to be 
doing well. We know of one instance 
where they paid $2,200 for a creek claim 
considered almost worthless, and they are 
now putting in expensive works to open it 
up in a proper manner. 

Magnolia. — 10th : The proprietors are 
running a tunnel from Mosquito Creek, 
which will strike the lead about forty feet 
lower, giving them backs of eighty feet. 
They have out about twenty tons at the 
shaft, which looks well. 

Oriental. — The Oriental Mill is running 
upon a lot of rock from the ledge of Beas- 
ley & Co., up Deer Creek. The rock looks 
well. 

Above the Cascades. — 11th : Several 
companies are prospecting on Upper Deer 
Creek. One man contracts to run a 200 
foot tunnel, and thoroughly prospect the 
ground, for one-half the claim. 

Eureka. — The Alta's semi-annual Mining 
Beview says : The Eureka Mine produced 
in June more than $47,000, of which, how- 
ever, $4,500 were from sulphurets collected 
in previous months. The total yield of the 
first half of the year was $2S5, 109 14, from 
9,000 tons of quartz, making an average of 
about $32 per ton. The expenses were 
$102,000, leaving $183,000, or more than 
$1,000 per day net, and $20 per ton net. 
The number of men employed is about one 
hundred and fifty. 



PLACER COUNTY. 

Murderer's Bar. — San Mateo Gazette, 
July 3d: The company now engaged with 
machinery on the upper end of Murderer's 
Bar, is Page, Down & Co. We learn that 
they expect to get their claim ready to 
work by next Monday. The warm weather 
has kept the river high, but the snow on 
the mountains was getting scarce and the 
water was falling rapidly. Murderer's Bal- 
is below the bridge on the west side of the 
river, and is supposed to be the old bed of 
the stream. The company spent last sum- 
mer in experimenting with different kinds 
of pumps and machinery in trying to keep 
their shaft clear of water, and by the time 
they had succeeded in perfecting their work, 
the rainy season commenced and the com- 
pany suspended work, secured their ma- 
chinery and waited. They expect to take 
out gold by the pound. 

PLUMAS COUNTY. 

Argentina. — Quincy National, July 3d : 
We firmly believe that the richest mine in 
the State of California is situated at Argen- 
tina, in this county, about ten miles from 
this place. Heath & Co. are now sluicing 
to the depth of forty feet, and it is paying 
them from an ounce to $20 per day to the 
hand. The gold-bearing earth consists of 
a vein about 300 feet wide, with neither 
length nor depth as yet determined. The 
rock is soft and varies in color from a dark 
brown to yellowish. The gold is found 
disseminated all through it in fine parti- 
cles, though the richest places are found in 
the rusty seams. They break it up and run 
it through ground sluices and boxes for 
nearly half a mile. 

A correspondent of the Santa Fe Herald, 
W. P. Early, speaks of the same mine, July 
1st, as follows: "Messrs. Heath & Free- 
man discovered that their predecessors 
threw away the rock that contained the 
treasure, and worked the white quartz 
only, which is comparatively barren. The 
mine is 300 feet in width and over 1,000 ft. 
in length, and is known to be a continuous 
body of rich mineral. The principal gold- 
bearing rock is talcose slate, the color be- 
ing a deep yellow. The talcose and quartz 
veins that course through it in every direc- 
tion, are completely spotted with sulphu- 
rets rich in gold. " 

SHASTA COUNTY. 

Upper Sacramento Items. — Correspond- 
ence of the Courier, July 10th: Alexander 
McMullen & Co. are digging a race across 
a bar on the Sacramento, three miles above 
Portuguese Flat, in order to mine the bed 
of the river in which they have found very 
rich prospects. The river has been wing- 
dammed in a number of places, and gener- 
ally paid well. Frank Moore & Thomas 
Neal are engaged in a wing-dam enterprise 
just below the mouth of Slate Creek. 

Hazel Creek is paying better than for 
years. McKenzio & Garrett, Johnson &, 
Co., Eeaton Brothers, and others are mak- 
ing from $3 to $5 per day to the hand. The 
gravel on this creek is of a burnt reddish 
hue, and contains any amount of porotis 
quartz, some of which is very rich in free 
gold. 
SIERRA COUNTY. 

Giant Powder. — Messenger, July 10th : 
Giant powder and single-hand drills have 
been in use at the Beis mine now for some 
time, and the verdict is that they save from 
thirty to thirty-five per cent, in the getting 
out of rock. It is also being used at the 
Independence aud Gold Bluff mines, and 
the Keyestone will put it into their tunnel 
as soon as they can getmen who thoroughly 
understand its use to introduce and in- 
struct the workmen. 

Arizona. 

Montgomery. — Miner, June 28th: C. B. 
Geuung has crushed, in his arastra, 2,500 
lbs. of Montgomery ore, and A. J. Shanks 
says he saw $90 taken from the arastra. 
The arastra was a new one, and it was 
thought that as much more worked its way 
down into the interstices. The lode has 
widened, and is now four feet thick. 

Sterling. — The Sterling folks are 
troubled with bad air. Work on the mill 
is progressing favorably. 

Lynx Creek. — Ed. Bowers informs us 
that many miners were at work with rock- 
ers when he left, most of them making fair 
wages. 

Upper Hassayampa. — It was reported in 
town yesterday, that a miner has taken out 
$300 in one week. 

Early the present week, word was brought 
to town that a rich gulch had been struck 
in the vicinity of the Placentas, near Wal- 
nut Grove, and that there were 24 Mexi- 
cans working in the gulch, rocking and 
panning. The latest news is that the Mexi- 
cans were making from $6 to $30 per day. 
.... We have been told that a miner pros- 
pecting near Prescott, struck a gulch out 



of which he took $9.50 in a few hours 

There are on the Lower Hassayampa, be- 
tween the two canons, bars that prospect 
exceedingly well, still nobody takes hold 
of them. Geo. Moore says five cents to the 
pan has been found in these bars. Plenty 
of water can be had there at all times. 

Colorado. 

Colorado against the World. — Regis- 
ter, June 24th: The Gilpin County and 
Coaley lodes, Silver Gulch, Black Hawk, 
are not only excelling everything in the 
silver line hitherto found in Colorado, but 
anything,yet produced in the United States. 
The ores excel those of the famous Poor- 
man lode of Idaho. For 100 ft. along the 
tunnel, the vein of rich ore appears. It is 
largely galena and zinc with masses of na- 
tive silver, or metallic silver with not more 
than ten per cent, of other matter. We 
have samples of it in our cabinet, and there 
are pieces of ore of the same character 
which Goodspeed offers to any one who 
will lift them, lying at the mine. 

Items. — Linden Castle lode has been 
opened to a depth of 85 ft. From the sur- 
face down it presented galena which as- 
sayed 48 ozs. of silver per ton. For 10 or 
15 ft. down the vein is well defined. From 
the bottom we took ores for assay which 
gave us 107.4 ozs. of silver worth $139.62 
in coin, and no gold. At the top, the ores 
as reported, assayed from 48 to 50 ozs .... 
Messrs. Woodbury & Co. , have been erect- 
ing at their mill a water wheel 23 ft. in 
diameter and four ft. breast. 

Chicago Creek. — A hole 12 ft. deep on 
the Kremlin, produced three tons of sul- 
phuret ore, selected samples of which as- 
sayed upwards of $1,700 per ton, and a 
quantity taken for an average, $36S per 
ton. 

The Plymouth Bock is another promis- 
ing lode. They have oj^ened only about 10 
ft. deep, but it shows rich sulphide ore. 
Clark, Sisty & Co., are opening a new dis- 
covery that looks well. The vein is a very 
large one, and the croppings assay over 
$100 per ton. 

Ward District.— June 25th: Edward 
Learned, President of the Ni- Wot Co., con- 
templates organizing a smelting company 
for working the ores of Boulder County, 
with a capital of $200,000. The Edgehill 
mill is now making good runs. Only one 
idle mill in the district, and we hope to 
have that in motion soon. On the Stough- 
ton, Mr. Thompson is again at w r ork. The 
mine is in rich pay. Geo. Worth & Co. 
are working their East Columbia mine, dis- 
closing a wide crevice of rich smelting ore. 
"Patch Diggings" have been discovered 
and claimed up on the slide of the Nelson 
lode. Gulch mining is carried on to 
Bhoad's Gulch. Down the creek (left 
hand) Erick Bottelson's 10-stamp mill is 
doing a good business. He is crushing 
from tho Horsetail, on Gold Hill, six ozs. 
of gold per cord. One mile below, Capt. 
Hall is putting in a first-class arastra, and 
further down, Strock has an arastra run- 
ning. 

At Jamestown the big mill of the Boston 
Co. is about ready for the machinery. Eight 
or ten arastras are constantly at work, ob- 
taining $75 to $100 per cord. Wilson's 
arastra is getting $100 per cord from Star 
of the West lode. First-class ore in the 
Hoosier, but no improvement in the man- 
agement. Parties are sluicing in "Doc's 
Gulch." 

Georgetown. — The Baker Co. are push- 
ing work on their new furnace, and pre- 
paring to put a large force of miners into 
their mine, which has improved greatly, 
both in quantity and quality of ore. On 
Saturday last the Brown Co. shipped 350 
ozs.; and Mr. Stewart, 125 ozs. of silver. 

The Marshall tunnel will cut all the main 
veins on Leavenworth and Burrill mount- 
ains. It is now in about 230 ft. Crow & 
Clark will be ready to begin drilling again 
in a few days. Mr. Snyder is erecting a 
frame house near the Snowdrift lode, for 
the accommodation of his hands. He is 
working eight. Cooper & Fisher are pre- 
paring to resume work on the Astor. 
Chamberlain & Black have sunk a shaft on 
the Chamberlain lode 80 ft. , and are run- 
ning a cross-cut to strike the vein at a 
depth of 150 ft. The lode proves extensive 
and rich. 

Daily. — The prospecting season is fairly 
open. Daily District is the center of at- 
traction. The people claim that the ore 
can be treated by raw amalgamation. If 
this is a fact, Daily District will outstrip 
any other in Colorado. 

Items. — On South Clear Creek mining 
has ceased for the time, owing to high 
water . . . . C. L. Bradley has started his new 
mill in Bussell Gulch. . . .Cheney has made 
a very fine run from ores of the Bobtail 
Co's mine; 28 ozs. per cord. . . .Creighton 
lode ores, yield an average of eight ozs. of 



July 17, I860.] 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



39 



gold bullion to the cord, the cost of crush- 
ing and mining being 82 ■ ,. This yields a 
net profit of about 8121 per cord. 

Idaho. 

Potosi Avalanche, July 10th.— 0. S. Peck 
i Co., have resumed work on this niiuo. 
The shaft is down 110 feet and the ledge 
locking well. 

Flint District. — Warnkee, Swartz & 
Co. crushed two tons of ore from the Sher- 
man, not specially selocted, at Black's Mill, 
which yielded 8538. 

MisKAR Mill. — This mill is running on 
Hamilton rock.... The rock of the Sher- 
man ledge, Flint, has been tested within 
the last few days, and assays 8200 per ton. 
The new hoisting works over the shaft of 
the Ida Elmore mine will bo in running 
order by the 15th. The Ida Elmore and 
the Golden Chariot have connected their 
tunnels under ground, by which both 
mines are now well ventilated. 

A new and very rial) mine has been 
struck by Owen MeMahon & Co. Free 
gold in sight. This mine is called the 
Dexter and is in French District, immedi- 
ately south of the Peck <fc Porter. 

The Ked Jacket shaft is down 40 feet 
and indications favorable. 

Tho water is being taken out of the Fire- 
light, when a shaft will be sunk 100 feet 

Tidal Wane, 6th: Black's Mill iu Flint 
has start'd up on Leviathan ore this time. 
The ledge shows a width of nine feet, and 
two men are taking out ore as fast as two 
men can assort it. . . .The Red Jacket has 
everything in good working order — shaft 
down 40 feet and nearly timbered — several 
tons of good milling ore on the surface in 

which free gold is visible Ida Elmore, 

never looked better since its discovery, a 
large lot of ore on the dump, and teams 
continually loading and hauling it to the 
mill. They are erecting a new engine 
house for tlxe purpose of putting in heavier 

machinery for hoisting works The 

Golden Chariot mine is equal to its best 
days. The deeper they go the wider and 
richer. . . . .The Baxter Company keeps on 
siuking in the main shaft with encouraging 
prospects. They are determined to put 
the shaft down another hundred feet, al- 
though they have plenty of good stoping 

ground above them The Silver Cord is 

showing as well as ever. Their shaft will 

be completed this month The Poorman 

has completed a shaft to the depth of 400 
feet. Levels are already started and prepa- 
rations made for running out an unusal 
quantity of rich ore. It is a rare circum- 
stance that a blast is required, and the ore 
is as docile and easily handled as native 

gold in placers Prospecting is being 

pushed forward extensively on the mount- 
ain. 

Northern Idaho. — Lewiston letter to 
Wave of July 9th: Everything is dried up 
about here. The Moose Creek mines are 
a failure. There have been a very few 
paying claims, bnt the ground is limited, 
and water scarce: The Chinamen are go- 
ing there. There are more men in Flor- 
ence than last year, but not as many in 
Warren's. Iu Oro Fino and Elk City re- 
ports give about the usual number of 
men. Tbe placer mines will fall short of 
the usual yield, owing to the scarcity of 
water. There is some encouragement from 
the quartz mines in Florence and War- 
ren's. 

Montana. 

A Helena correspondent of the Oroville 
Record of July 10th, says: Quartz mining 
is improving in all parts of the Territory, 
and when machinery can be got as easily 
as in California or Nevada, we will show as 
large shipments as either. The Whitlatch 
Uuion — named for the Quartz King of 
Montana— is paying from $30 to $40 per 
ton, and will continue for years fully as 
good. The Whitlatch Park Mining Co. is 
an extension of the same lode, and pros- 
pects better than the discovery. They will 
have a mill on it this fall, and no doubt will 
realize a fortune. 

Nevada. 

COPE DISTRICT. 

From the Elko Independent, July 10 th: 
There has been the usual fluctuations. in 
Cope District stock that always attends the 
development of a new district. The first 
party that came in, gave glorious accounts. 
Then came the rush, followed by the re- 
turn of the croakers. Time has now been 
given for the second, sober thought, and 
we can speak confidently. Tuesday, our 
townsman, O. E. Johnson, who is known 
to everybody as a man of cool, sound judg- 
ment, returnedfrom a ten day's tri2D to Cope. 
He brought with him samples of the ore 
from the Argenta, Pioneer, California, 
Hamilton, and several other lodes, aud we 
have not seen in our experience a finer lot 



of surface rock. The lodes he describes as 
being from four to ten feet in width, ly- 
ing in granite, and giving every promise of 
permanency. We learn that Col. Frank 
Denver is now having three tons of ore 
from the Argenta worked at Doll's mill iu 
Washoe, 

Again, same date: A gentleman who left 
Cope District on the 3d inst., informs us 
that the excitement there continues un- 
abated, in consequence of the daily discov- 
ery of new ledges. Twenty-one original 
locations are claimed to be separate and 
distinct ledges. Negotiations are now 
pending for tho erection of reduction works 
on ono of the mill sites. Cope District is 
destined to become a mining camp of con- 
siderable importance within a very brief 
period. 

Items. — Reports from Bull's Run of the 
most favorable character. Tho veins are 

from two to four ft wide A few days 

ago an immonso quartz lodgo, 20 ft. in 
width, was discovered 25 miles from town, 
and a few hundred yards from Mountain 
City road. The ledge escaped discovery 
by the prospectors, owing to the peculiar 
color of tho eroppiugs. 

Tho Alia has an Elko telegram dated 
July 10th, saying: The Cope ore is similar 
to that of White Pine District. One ton 
crushed at the Washoe mills and worked 
by tho dry process turned out over $600 to 
the ton. 

ESMERALDA. 

An Aurora correspondent of tho Sacra- 
mento Union, says, July 2d: A party passed 
through here this week who has located 
20 claims in Deep Spring Valley, 25 miles 
northwest from Palmetto District. There 
are 50 miners at work, and this partj^ as 
agent for an English company in San Fran- 
cisco to purchase a 20-stenip mill. 

HUMBOLDT. 

Sheba Mine.— From the Elko Independ- 
ent, July 7th; Seven or eight tons of ore 
were shipped from this mine to San Fran- 
cisco a few days (ago, which yielded, per 
assay, $475 per ton, and was taken at that 
valuation by shippers who intended send- 
ing it to Swansea for reduction. 

An Eastern company has purchased the 
Register mine from Bonnifield <Sr Coulter. 
The ore from this mine will be shipped to 
San Francisco. 

Robert McBeth, of the Little Giant 
mine, in Battle Mountain District, has 
gone below to make arrangements for ship- 
ping a certain class of ore which cannot be 
worked satisfactorily at the company's mill. 
It yields on an average, $265 per ton, when 
there is twice that amount in the ore. 

Large and well-defined copper mines are 
now being developed in this district, the 
ore paying from 40 to 60 per cent. . . .Tlie 
Yosemite mine, near Dun Glen, is yielding 
exceedingly rich ore, and in paying quan- 
tities A great number of capitalists are 

now examining the Humboldt mines. Min- 
ers can sell their ore on the dnmp at good 
figures. The miners at Winnemucca con- 
tinue to ship large quantities of ore. 

REESE RIVER. 

Mineral Hill District. — Reveille, July 
10th: This is a new district organized at 
the locality whence came Mr. Northey's 
wagon load of ore, which worked at the 
Manhattan mill in this city, $550 per ton, 
Quite a number of our people have left for 
the district within the last three days, and 
more are going. It is between Cortes and 
Elko, 15 miles east of the mouth of Garden 
Valley. 

Hot Creek District. — A letter to the 
Shermantown Telegram of the 9th, says: 
The New Philadelphia ledge has a 40-foot 
shaft and eight ft. of ore. The Wyoming 
has a shaft down 93 ft., and has produced 
300 tons of ore. Of this, 100 tons gave a 
pulp assay of $123 to the ton; and a few as- 
sorted tons gave $417 per ton. The "Pure 
Metal" ledge is 100 ft. wide, and crops 50 
ft. high for 600 ft. in length. I was shown 
several assays, that ranged from $110 to 
$3,000 per ton. The Gazelle, Silver Bright 
and Ingomar, are all undoubtedly rich. 
Present appearances indicate a bright future 
for old Hot Creek. 
WASHOE. 

[ In the Stock Circular, in another por- 
tion of this paper will be found late mining 
news from this district. 1 

Reopening the Mines.— Gold Hill News, 
July 9th : The various drifts of the Crown 
Point, Kentuck and Yellow Jacket mines, 
are now being reopened; as the fire is sup- 
posed to be entirely extinguished. The 
700-ft. level of the Yellow Jacket was re- 
opened day before yesterday, and quite a 
strong gas has been coming from it ever 
since. It still has overpowering effects. 

The old hoisting works over the north 
shaft of the Yellow Jacket have been com- 
pletely overhauled, and the building re- 



paired. They expect to commence hoist- 
ing water from the shaft by Monday next. 

Mine Starting Up.— The old "Saucer 
mine in Gold Cation, above Devil's Gate, 
started up again yesterday. It has not 
been worked for a conple of yoars or more. 

Crown Point. — It being considered 
likely that the fire in the upper levels of 
that and the Kentuck mine was at length 
smothered out, three of the closed levels 
next above the 1,000 were reopened yester- 
day. The result is that the fire is found to 
be still burning, aud an increase of gas and 
smoke is driven out through the Yellow 
Jacket. The drifts have to be closed again. 

Gould & Curry is yielding about 50 tons 
per day from the upper levels. The heavy 
shaft of the pump engine, which was broken 
a day or two since, is not yet repaired or 
replaced, but will be, probably, by the first 
of next week. 

WHITE PINE. 

" Singloliue's " letter from Sherman- 
town, in the Enterprise of the 11th, says : 
" White Pine never promised so well, or 
yielded so well, as to-day. There is not an 
idle stamp in the country — everything that 
will grind ore is in motion day and night, 
reducing rock which is not difficult to work 
and which is said to yield well. New 
stamps are being erected every day; and 
just as soon as a battery is ready to run the 
rock is on hand in abundance to feed it. 
From those stamps which are in motion, 
and have been in motion for from six 
months to six days, the bullion goes stead- 
ily away, to some country, in regular in- 
stallments. I have seen, with my eyes, as 
much as a ton of nearly pure silver at one 
load going over the mountain from Sher- 
mantown to Hamilton." 

Weekly Report. — Neios, July 10th : 
Owing to the festivities incident to a three 
days celebration of our national indepen- 
dence, but little progress has been made in 
the mines, and our bullion shipment for 
the week foots up but $61,299.19, being 
$10,719.27 less than last week. Aurora 
South, one of our leading mines, has been 
compelled to knock off 20 miners this week 
(having over forty left) on account of ac- 
cumulation of ore without milling facili- 
ties. It is estimated that the present force 
will have between 1,500 and 2,000 tons of 
ore ready for the first run of Stanford's 
mill. 

Quarterly Review op Bullion. — Em- 
pire, 11th: During the quarter ending June 
3th, the following shipments of bullion 
were made from the Eberhadt mills, as 
shown by the assayer's books: From the 
Oasis mill, $167,096.62; from the Drake 
mill, $42,985.71; making a total of $210,- 
082.33. 

Items. — News: Shaft on the Lexington 
40 feet on the 9th ... . Paris mine has struck 
it in the south side of the incline. . . .Metro- 
politan 1 and 2 improved as to ore, and 
ledge widens — will probably be a single 

ledge at greater depth Rich ore at 120 

feet depth in the Genessee shaft of the Con- 
solidated Chloride Flat Co Charles 

Mallet shaft 60 feet deep; work resumed. 
. . . .Sinking commenced vertically in Eg- 
gleston & Brown on July 1st Rich chlo- 
ride ore in the Pogonip and Othello struck 

July 1st Work re-commenced on the 

Jefferson on July 7th The west shaft 

of the Hidden Treasure South has come 
upon a singular deposit of rich ore. At the 
depth of 12 feet the shaft penetrated a cav- 
ity in the hard rock filled with a decom- 
posed mass which is worth about $5 per 
pound. The opening is about four feet 
wide, so far as known, and runs off west 

northwest to an unknown distance 

First dividend of the Industry was $4 per 

share Empire says Capt. Holdridge has 

bought Rainbow No. 2 for $4,000 cash 

Telegram says the Chester mine has 20 tons 
of ore on the dump that will average $125. 

Water Works, — Empire, 9th: The 12- 
inch supply pipes are being laid at the rate 
of 1,000 ft. per day. The enginesand pumps 
are in place and nearly ready to drive water 
through the summit tunnel. Two reser^ 
voirs are under contract. 

Bullion Hill. — Telegram, July 3d: 
Bullion No. 10 has a shaft down 40 feet, 
and 70 tons of excellent milling ore on the 
dump. 

The Santa Clara is a very promising 
mine, situated in the Base Range. The 
principal owners are in San Francisco. The 
Company is incorporated. Their shaft is 
down 20 feet, and they have at least 25 tons 
of ore on their dump. 

The Elm is also a fine mine, and will in 
all probability ere long, prove to be one of 
the most valuable in the Base Range. The 
ore shows horn silver in larger quantities 
than the most sanguine anticipated. The 
company are busy running an open cut 
across the ledge, for the purpose of ascer- 



taining its true wealth. The principal own- 
ers arc hero, and have any quantity of that 
which is' most needful to develop a mine, 
muscle. 

Mohawk Canon— News : The Cassaday 
Ledge, a recent discovery, and location iu 
Mohawk Canon, is ono of the most prom- 
ising of the base metal mines. The vein is 
well defined, traceable 300 feet, and is from 
two to three feet in width. The ore, a 
beautiful specimen of which we have, con- 
tains some galena, but is rich in chloride, 
and assays from $95 to $238.77 iu silver. 

Murray Ledge. — This is the name of a 
new discovery in Sawmill Canon, western 
slope of White Pine Mountain, which car- 
ries tho finest-looking quartz we have seen 
from the base metal region. The ledge is 
four feet wide, and the ore will doubtless 
yield handsomely by smelting. 

Mills.— News, 9th : Stanford's Mill ma- 
chinery is arriving. Logan's Mill, at Swan- 
sea, will steam up on Monday. Says the 
Empire of the 11th : The Pocotillo Com- 
pany is going to build a mill at the foot of 
the hill below the mine Elko Independ- 
ent of 10th says, the roads are strung with 
teams, loaded with machinery etc. for White 
Pine. 

Outside Districts. — News, 6th: The Oro 
Fino holds its place on the Star ledge of 

Sacramento district The Empire of 11th 

says : Messrs. Yager and Goodwin from 
Reveille district, brought in 300 pounds of 

ore which assayed $2,950 per ton Some 

fine ledges have been struck in the mount- 
ains west of Duckwater, 35 miles south of 
Hamilton. Assays go as high as $900 per 
ton. Some excitement already. .... Telegram 
of 6th says, everybody is busy in Patterson 
District. The little 2 stamp mill works up 

ore worth $200 per ton Over 100 men 

on their way to Mount Ophir District on 
July 2d, and 300 already there. 

Eberhardt.— " A reduction in wages 
from $5 to $4 has taken place in the Eber- 
hardt mine, in consequence of which the 
miners struck, and work has stopped. At a 
meeting of the Miners' Union a committee- 
was appointed to confer with the Superin- 
tendent of the Eberhardt. A special meet- 
ing of the Union will be held to take action 
on-the report of the committee. It is under- 
stood that other leading mines will also re- 
duce the wages." 

New Mexico. 

Arroyo Hondo. — Santa Fe Gazette, June 
26th: The Mining and Ditch Co. have re- 
ceived the machinery for their 15-stamp 
quartz mill, and are putting it up. 

Abiqutu. — The gentlemen who visited 
Abiquiu to look into the value of the 
mines, have returned. We understand 
they report good indications for gold, but 
that the water for washing it will have to 
be brought from the Chama — a distance of 
three or four miles. 

It is understood that th» Moreno ditch 
will be completed this week. The reports 
from these mines are flattering. More 
gold is offered for sale in Elizabethtown 
than there are greenbacks with which to 
purchase it. 

A correspondent of the St. Louis Demo- 
crat writing from Elizabethtown, N. M., 
June 4th, says that L. B. Maxwell has sold 
his grant to some English speculators for 
$800,000, making some valuable reserva- 
tions. 

The Moreno Lantern, of Elizabethtown, 
says : The shipment of gold for three days 

this week amounts to $6, 222. 34 Calhoun 

& Co., in Grouse Gulch, cleaned up on 

Friday 21 ounces from four days' run 

Matthew Lynch sold his interest in Max- 
well's mill and lode last week, for $ '>0,000 
cash, to Col. Bergmann and John Dold. . . . 
Pat. Connelly sold his interest in the Pa- 
cific lode last week, to a Mr. Hayden, from 

Cincinnati, for $5,000 Robert Floorman 

started up Bartholomew's 8-stamp mill in 
Humbug this morning, on ore from the 
North Star lode. . . -Pollock's claim at the 
foot of Grouse Gulch gave 11 ounces and 
18 pennyweights of gold, worth $262, the 
result of the labor of six men in one day 
and a half. 

Oregon. 

Good Clean Up. — Jacksonville Sentinel, 
July 3d: Messrs. Dillon & Bowden cleaned 
up last week, after crushing 70 tons of 
quartz. The result is not made public, but 
the proprietors are in good spirits, and say 
that they got more than a good working 
prospect. They will push work again vig- 
orously. 

Prof. John Veaf,ch will make a geologi- 
cal survey of Bohemia District. The same 
gentleman, associated with J. Knott and 
Richard White, have agreed for an interest 
in the Excelsior lead, to make a thorough 
and scientific examination of that lead, and 
to report within a reasoi^.ble time. 



40 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 17, 1869. 



LINING AND SCIENTIFIC iJRESS. 



. B. EWER Senior Editor. 



A. T. DEWEY. W. B. EWER, 

BEWEV «fc CO., Publishers. 



Office, >'o. 114 Clay street, below Sangome. 



Terms of Subscription: 

One copy, per annum, in advance ?5 00 

One copy, six months, in advance 3 00 

fly"For Bale by Carriers and Newsdealers.*^! 



Our Agents. 



Our Friends can do mnch in aid of onr paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and science, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their 
influence and encouraging favors, We intend to send 
none but worthy men. 

Traveling; Accents. 

E. M. Dewey, California. 

Wm. H. Murray, California and Nevada. 

Dr. L. G. Tates, California. 

Isaac D. Street, Oregon. 

Resident Agents. 

Oakland— W. H. Hardy. 

California and Nevada — S. H. Herring. 

Sacramento — A. S. Hopkins, No. 70 J street. 

Treasure City, Nev.— J. L. Robertson. 

Shermantown, Nev. — T. G. Anderson. 

Helena, Montana — E. W. Carpenter. 

Black Hawk, C. T. — Harper M. Orahood. 

Central City, C. T. — Richards & Crane. 

Georgetown, C. T. — John A. Lafferty, Postmaster. 

Denver City, C. T — Woolworth & Moffat. 

Cheyenne, D. T. — Robert Beers. 

Omaha, N. T. — Barkalow & Brothers. 

London— George Street, 30 Cornhill, E. C. 

A. C. Knox, City Soliciting and Collecting Agent. 



San Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, July 17, 1869. 



Notices to Correspondents. 

Juniper, Santa Cruz. — Arboriculture pos- 
sesses other recommendations to those 
purporting to become permanent resi- 
dents of California, than mere personal 
profit. In a dry climate, the want of an 
adequate amount of trees is apt to occa- 
sion irregularity of temperature ; violent 
storms, and aridity, while on the other 
hand, land overclothed with wood may 
produce the opposite effects, viz. , a com- 
paratively stagnated character of the at- 
mosphere accompanied with, to human 
constitutions, an unhealthy amount of 
moisture. 

C. W. B. , Oakland.— The mortality of poul- 
try which is known to prevail in so mys- 
terious a manner, has not, so far as we 
are informed, been referred to any spe- 
cial cause. An acquaintance who has 
paid more than a ten years' attention to 
the subject, conceives that amongst 
chickens, the mortality is chiefly attribu- 
able to apoplexy; but with ducks and 
geese, to an inflammation of the bowels, 
though how occasioned, he never could 
satisfy himself other than that it prob- 
ably arose in consequence of moltiDg. 
The subject in an economic and scientific 
view, possesses great interest, and we 
would like to hear from any correspond- 
ent disposed to throw light on the sub- 
ject. 

S. M. R. — According to the cosmogony of 
Pythagoras, the infant world was repre- 
sented as placed on the back of an ele- 
phant, itself being supported on the back 
of a tortoise. This, and the transmigra- 
tion of souls, formed parts of Hindoo 
mythology. It is supposed that the my- 
thical tortoise alluded to has been based 
on the fact that the remains of an enor- 
mous tortoise, Colossochelys Atlas have 
been discovered in India, which pos- 
sessed a shell twelve feet long, eight feet 
in diameter, and sis feet high. 

Piscator, Marin County. — It is quite prob- 
able that both the sole and turbot, two of 
the most valuable fishes, would flourish 
from the Bay of Monterey to Fuca 
Straits, if the ova were transported here 
andplanted on appropriate banks. Calcu- 
lations have been made as to the moneyed 
worth of certain fishing stations, by 
which it has been estimated that the 
value of the /raiding ground in the Ger- 
man ooeau is equal to 25 cents per acre, 
aDd that of the Bay of Gal way (Ireland), 
is worth more per acre than the land 
which environs it. 



Mechanical Movements. — We have re- 
cently made arrangements by which we 
shall be enabled shortly to place on sale on 
this coast, a large and splendid edition of 
a book of over 500 Mechanical Move- 
ments, which we will sell at Eastern 
prices, in order to place it within easy 
reach of every inventor on the Pacific 
Coast. 



Only four States of Mexico are now in a 
state of revolution. 



Postal Telegraphing. 

The Herald is making a gallant strike in 
favor of postal telegraphing — more defi- 
nitely in favor of the passage of the Hub- 
bard bill before Congress at the next ses- 
sion. In this it appears that the Herald 
has the sympathies of the entire commu- 
nuity, and not alone of the Democratic 
party which sustains that newspaper on the 
telegraph question. To the Associated 
Press this is purely and rather keenly a 
matter of business. But that association 
would do unwisely to oppose any obstacle, 
avowedly or otherwise, to a system of cheap 
telegraphing which shall be at the com- 
mand of all; for intelligence should be in 
principle like sunshine, at the service of 
everybody, on the freest terms. What is 
more, postal telegraphing is a thing all but 
certain to come to pass. The wires being 
once stretched, there is little cost thereafter 
in transmitting even long messages, under 
the use of the improved instruments 
whereby writing at one or both ends of 
the wire is reduced to a minimum of labor. 
The introduction of the money order sys- 
tem in the Post-office Department was a 
greater innovation a few years ago than 
postal telegraphing would be at the present 
time. 

This is a question so eminently practical, 
so undeniably in the interest of the public, 
and in accordance with that peculiar Amer- 
ican energy which brings new inventions 
unceremoniously into practical application, 
that the result can be but a matter of time. 
Kewspaper enterprise will always find field 
enough outside of telegraph combinations, 
to enable it to hold its own against all up- 
start competition. It is only lack of enter- 
prise and lack of brains on the part of es- 
tablished journalistic undertakings, that can 
have the least to fear from the inaugura- 
tion of cheap postal telegraphing; for then 
the competition would be more on a 
basis of absolute merit, and in such a case 
certainly in the interest of the reading and 
doing public. 

The Associated Press and the Reuter or 
ganizations of modern times are amongst 
the most commendable of the fruits of in- 
vention and of advancing civilization; their 
services to the public have been and con- 
tinue to beinvaluable, though they do stand 
towards unadmitted newspapers sometimes 
in the guise of a monopoly. Postal tele- 
graphing would not do away with any " as- 
sociated press monopoly;" but on the con- 
trary, while affording to others the oppor- 
tunity to compete, in the widest dissemina- 
tion of intelligence, the Associated Press 
would maintain its individuality in its su- 
periority of news, in the greater value and 
better quality of the matter collected for 
the general public. 

On this principle it is that the general 
public can now afford to pay a hundred 
times more for news of every kind trans- 
mitted in its interest, including stocks and 
financial reports, than can even the most 
powerful moneyed and individual interests. 
"We recognize it as a demand of the times, 
— a point to which we have attained in the 
history of newspapers and telegraphing, — 
that the transmission of news on which so 
much depends, should be on the freest 
footing, and entirely untrammeled by dic- 
tates or interests of individuals and corpo- 
rations. This great principle has ever been 
acted upon by the government — that the 
telegraph must be subservient tn the uses 
of the government. Who is to care for the 
interests of the quiet, the unorganized, 
long-suffering, and in all ages the much- 
abused and too often slavish public at 
large? The newspapers, in our day, — and a 
liberal Associated Press. 



Hearth and Home, published by Pet- 
tingill, Bates' & Co., No. 37 Park Row, 
N. X., contains some very excellent matter. 
No. 30 begins " Romance of a Rich Young 
Girl," by Octave Fuillet. 



Fourth Annual Report of Yale Sci- 
entific School. 

The Fourth Annual Report of the Shef- 
field Scientific School of Yale College has 
been received — but unfortunately too 
late to enable us to incorporate its facts 
in our remarks on that subject made in a re- 
cent issue. No changes have been made 
in any of the professorships for several 
years. We miss the names of A. P. Rock- 
well, professor on the subject of Mining, 
and Charles J. Sheffield, instructor in As- 
saying; the same grouud being well cov- 
ered, however, by Professors Norton and 
Brush. Amongst the instructor's list of 
names, J. B. Stone, C. E., in Mathematics, 
is replaced by Daniel H. Wells, C. E. ; Bev- 
erly S. Bnrton, Ph. B., on Chemistry, by 
William G. Mixter, Ph. B. ; John Avery, 
M. A., on Physics, is missed; and new in- 
structors have been appointed as follows : 
Sydney Smith, Ph. B-, on Zoology; E. T. 
Nelson, B. A., on Mineralogy; and Henry 
S. Williams, Ph. B., on Paleontology; Wil- 
bur O. Atwater, B. A., and E. H. Bristol, 
Ph. B.,on Chemistry. 

The number of students in 1868-9 was 
137; the number of graduates in 1868 was 
26. A valuable list is given of all who 
have been members of Yale Scientific 
School since its begiuning in 1846, a total 
of 693; also of all the graduates, nuniber- 
ing«to 1868 inclusive, 155. 
The following are those permanently iden- 
tified with, and residing on the Pacific Coast. 

1855-S Abernethy, William Oregon City, Oregon. 

18G2-3 Blake, Theodore A., E.A. N. Y. Free Acad. (Civil 
and Min. Eng.) - Sau Francisco, Cal. 

1810-52 Blake, William Phipps, PH. B. (Geologist.) 
Professor in the College of California; Geolo- 
gist to the U. S. Pacific R. R. Ex. under Lieut. 
R. S. Williamson Washington. D. C. 

1848-50 Brewer. Wm. Henry, ph.b., M.A., Botanist to Ge- 
ological Survey of California; Norton Prof, of 
Ag. in Yale CoU New Haven, Conn. 

1858-60 Cifuentes, Jose Filomeno, PH.B. .Copiapo, Chili. 

188-1-0 Clark, Frederick W San Francisco, Cal. 

1868-9 Dwinelle, Charles H Oakland, Cal. 

1857 Fisher, R. A., m.d., o/.Prof. oi Chem., Min. and 
Metall. in Univ. of Cala.. .San Francisco, Cal. 

1S61-4 Goodyear, Watson Andrews, ph.b. (Civil and 
Min. Eng.) San Francisco, Cal. 

1863-5 Hunt, Henry O. (Assayer.) .Sau Francisco, Cal. 

1862-5 Massey, Albert P., PH.B.. San Fraucisco, Cal. 

1859-62 Moore, Gideon E, PH.B. (Chem.) Assayer to the 
Gould & Curry Min. Co., Va San Francisco. 

1854-5 Ortiz, Pedro P Valparaiso. Chili. 

185S-60 Rice, Julio Alberto PaiTal, Mexico. 

1863-6 Thomas, Frederick F-, n.A. Ph.D. (Assayer.) 

Silver Peak, Nev. 

1863-5 Throckmorton, S.R., B.A... San Francisco, Cal. 

1848-9 Webster, G. G. M.A. LL.B Sun Francisco, Cal. 

1861-2 Wilcox, Edward P, Waioli. Sandwich Isl. 

lS6Gi-2 Wilcox, Geo. N Waioli, Sandwich Isl. 



New Woolen Mills. — The San Jose 
Woolen Manufacturing Company have or- 
dered all their machinery for a six-set 
mill of the agents of the builders, Messrs. 
W. O. M. Berry & Co., of this city, and it 
is expected to be shipped at an early day. 
The machinery ordered is to be Davis & 
Furber's make, built at their celebrated 
works, near Lawrence, Mass., except the 
looms, which are to be Crompton's patent, 
built at Worcester, Mass. The company 
have just broke ground for the new mill, 
at San Jose, which is to be a three-story 
building, aDd intend to have it all ready to 
receive the machinery by the time it ar- 
rives here. They design manufacturing 
blankets, flannels, and plain and fancy 
cassimeres. 

At Los Gatos (Santa Clara County), a set 
of woolen machinery is being set up by 
Mr. W. S. McMurtrie, in connection with 
his sawmill, to be run by water-power. 
This a second-hand set of machinery, 
formerly run by Mr. Rector, at Oakland. 
If the enterprise proves successful, it is 
probable that new machinery will be added. 
■ -** ■«■»■-*«- * 

Notes on the Hawaiian Eruption of 
1868.— The Boston Society of Natural His- 
tory publishes a quarto pamphlet, pp. 24, 
by W. T. Brigham, A. M., with two illus- 
trations describing the phenomena of the 
late eruption, and contributing additional 
information to our knowledge of the earth's 
interior through the doings of its greatest 
known exponent, Mauna Loa. 

The Jdltua Insurance Company, of Hart- 
ford, Conn., held its 50th annual meeting, 
July 1st, and was attended by James M. 
Goodwiu, who was a director at the organi- 
zation of the company, and has been ever 
since. 



The " Engineering and Mining Journal." 

This is now the title of our New York 
cotemporary, which lately came to us as 
the American Journal of Alining. The im- 
proved appearance with the new finely-en- 
graved head, is especially noteworthy, and 
there is at the same time a solid value to 
a number of the articles that we find in 
the first number. Such is that on the very 
long-spaDned beton bridge of Coignet, at 
St. Dennis in the environs of Paris, which 
is illustrated — beton being merely a fine 
concrete which has been found sufficiently 
adhesive in a non-earthquake country to 
make a strong and durable flying arch of 
196 feet span. The Connecticut Peat 
Works are also described ; an establishment 
for cutting or grinding and molding peat 
into bricks, which, by an outlay of $10,000 
is capable of producing 100 tons of peat 
fuel per day. H. B. Cornwall commences 
a review of processes that have been tried, 
and with success latterly, for the desilveri- 
zation of lead by means of zinc. 

Western & Co. now fill a field in the En- 
gineering and Mining Journal, and in the 
Manufacturer and Builder, which, if cred- 
itably represented by American periodical 
publications specially devoted to the sub- 
jects embraced, will not merely do honor to 
us abroad, but will incalculably benefit 
ourselves iu advancing the development of 
our boundless resources. It is in the same 
fie'd that the Mining and Scientific 
Pbess has represented, and still serves as 
the exponent of, the Western progress of 
the energies and arts of the Gothic race, a 
phenomenon of historic conquest — of races, 
of territories, and we may say now of the 
unreclaimed world itself — more remarka- 
ble and more telling in its results for the 
future, than is the strangely sounding 
(to us) story of the inroads of the Goths 
themselves into Celtic Europe, at the be- 
ginning of the Christian era. 

Such publications, and the manner iu 
which they are sustained by contributions 
of respectable matter, of ideas and facts 
pointing to general welfare and progress, 
are the index of the intelligence and capac- 
ity of the bodies they represeut. Where 
there is no exhibition of practical thought of 
a generally useful bearing in the science 
and intelligence of the better educated or 
trained and competetent engineers and me- 
chanics, overflowing into the pages of a 
weekly or monthly periodical in this en- 
lightened day, the conclusion is tolerably 
safe that the merit not only of the mass, 
but especially ot the leaders practically 
and theoretically and qualified to be such, 
is subordinate and insignificant in a sum- 
ming up of the progress of the arts and 
professions represented. 



The Avitoe. — To set at rest any doubts 
as to the complete success of Marriott's 
aerial steam carriage, the Avitor, a public 
exhibition will take place at the Mechanics' 
Pavilion on Stockton street, between Post 
and Geary, on Tuesday, July 20th, at 
which time a large number of eminent 
engineers and capitalists of this city and 
State will be present to witness this novel 
invention, inaction. On the following day 
the public will have a chance to witness an 
exhibition of the same character, at the 
same place. A committee of eminent en- 
gineers has been formed for the purpose of 
constructing a working Avitor of large 
size, and one capable of carrying a number 
of passengers, which will be ready for op- 
eration in the course of sixty days. 

To Remove Rust. — The removal of rust 
from a tool or any other iron implement, 
will be greatly aided by first soakiDg it for 
a short time in kerosene oil. It is really 
wonderful to notice the ease with which 
rust may be removed after being thus sat- 
urated. 



Miss Anna E. Dickinson's lectures have 
proved the greatest success of any course 
ever given in San Francisco. 



July 17, 1SC9.] 



T\\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



The New Breech Loader. 

Considerable interest was manifested at 
the Bast, abont a year ago, over the intro- 
duction of Parker's new breech-loading 
gnn. Gen. Siege] expressed himself very 
much pleased with it, and ordered a thor- 
ough test of its advantages as compared 
with other breech-loaders in use. The re- 
sult of this trial was a verdict in favor of 
the Parker, over all other breech-loaders. 
The chief advantages of this, over other 
similar weapons, arises from the fact that 
the load is placed in a metallic shell, which 
remains in tho gun, uninjured, after the 
discharge, the same shell being used for 
scores of times. Common ammunition is 
also used, instead of expressly prepared or 
high priced, as is usually required by 
breech-loaders. The expense of the use of 
this piece is thereby very much lessened. 
The weapon and charge is so arranged that, 
as claimed, it may be loaded and discharged 
more rapidly than any other, and with per- 
fect safety. A large number of loads may 
be Earned in the pocket, knapsack or pouch. 
The cost of the gun is less than one-half 
that of others of the same class. As a sport- 
ing gun, it would appear impossible that 
it could be excelled. The first invoice of 
these guns received in San Francisco, ar- 
rived a few days since, consigned to Mr. 
Bichard Tibbals, agent for the manufact- 
urers, films from this invoice may be seen 
at the store of Messrs. Liddle & Kaeding, 
638 Washington street, and at the labora- 
tory of Mr. T. C. Jessup, over Tucker's 
jewelry store, on Montgomery street; at 
cither of which places they may be exam- 
ined by those curious or specially interested 
in such matters. 



The 



Grass Valley Strike.- 
Proceedings. 



-Outrageous 



The Nevada papers give the particulars 
of a brutal assault upon two different par- 
ties of workmen who were returning home, 
a few nights since, from their work at the 
Empire mine. The outrages are charged, 
either directly or indirectly, to the Miners' 
Union of that place; and as having been 
perpetrated because the men were using 
Giant powder, which the deluded strikers 
think it is their especial mission to crush 
out of existence. The Union, in alluding 
to the outrage, says: " This knocking a 
man down in the dark is a " moral suasion " 
method of keeping the Empire mine idle. 
These facts, simply related, are comments 
sufficient on the state of affairs now exist- 
ing at Grass Valley. The public have been 
told not to agitate while such quiet and 
smoothness exist here." The entire power 
of the State should be called upon, if nec- 
essary, to protect the proprietors of the 
Grass Valley mines in their undoubted 
ri«ht to employ whichever kind of powder 
they think best, so long as they can find 
men who are perfectly willing to use it. 
Any concession to the strikers on that point 
would be fatal, in the extreme, not only to 
the mining interests of Grass Valley, but 
throughout the entire Pacific Coast, as 
well. 



Solar Spots, according to the observa- 
tions of Schwabe, continued without in- 
termission for more than thirty years, 
possess a periodicity, the length of the 
period being eleven years and forty days, 
measured by the extent of surface of the 
sun observed by these phenomena. Col. 
Sabine, to whom was deputed the discus- 
sion of the results of the British Colonial 
magnetic observations, arrived at the re- 
markable result that the dicennial maxima 
and minimo magnetic effects coincided 
with the dicennial period observed by 
Schwabe in the solar spots, from which it 
has been inferred that the sun exercises a 
magnetic influence upon the earth, coin- 
cident on the condition of the luminous 
solar envelope. 



Still's Gate Latch. 

Mr. John W. Still, of San Francisco, has 
devised and patented through Dewey & 
Co., the gate latch here represented, in 
favor of which many good poiuts are ad- 
vanced. 

A, is the upright of the gate frame, to 
which the latch is attached. The two screws 
seen in the engraving constitute its fasten- 
ing to the gate, holding in placo a little 
vertical rod or pivot (visible upon close 
examination of the cut) on which tho latch 
swings, regulated by tho spring C. When 
thegatc is closed, thenotchB holds against 
the stationary post, preventing the gate 
from opening without first drawing the 
ring B sidewards, in such a manner as to 
compress the spring C; that motion causes 
the notch B to clear the post, and permits 
the gate then to open. 



Polytechnic Branch of the 
Institute. 



Mechanics' 




Approaching from the other side, the 
handle D would have to be drawn in the 
opposite direction. When pushed to, the 
gate will of itself spring the spiral, C, and 
bring the notch B to a catch. 

The favorable points of Mr. Still's latch 
are given as follows : 

1st. Durability; as he warrants them for 
ten years, in ordinary wear. 

2d. In security; as no kind of stock can 
open them. 

3d. Neatness and elegance of style. 

4th. Ease of adjusting to the gate, as 
there is no mortising and only four screws 
required. Little time for adjusting the 
latch is required by the carpenter. 

5th. Cheapness. 

6th. Convenience; as the gate can read- 
ily be opened from either side. 

7th. There is comparatively no resist- 
ance to the gate closing, in which case the 
rigid Latch A, supported by the spring B, 
glides across the inclined plate C, and hooks 
over the end of it securely. 

Testimony as to the working of these 
latches will be found in our advertising co- 
lumns. Most of them are manufactured 
with a flat spring, instead of the spiral 
spring shown in the engraving, the former 
answering equally well and is cheaper. 
This latch is quickly attached to the gate 
and needs no machinery; the flat spring 
requiring but a slight cutting away on the 
frame of the gate. 

The Workshop, published by E. Steiger, 
No. 22 Frankfort street, New York, is a 
credit to American periodical literature; 
No. 6 of Vol. II being received, and beau- 
tifully printed and filled as usual with very 
costly artistic engravings of industrial art; 
supplying designs and ideas for growing 
wealth and increased luxury in this coun- 
try- 

A White Pine correspondent mentions 
favorably the " Black Bock," the "Jennie 
A," the " Ochotura," the "Home Pile 
Tunnel Co. ," the " Treasure Hill Junction, " 
the "Independence No. 1," and some other 
mines, which communication has been 
postponed too long for publication now. 



Pulman, the celebrated palace, eating 
and sleeping car man, is now building a 
grand church-car to run on Sunday trains 
on the Union Pacific Bailroad. 



The Eamie and Kindred Textiles. 

A large ami very intelligent audience at- 
tended the first of the polytechnic meet- 
ings of tho Mechanics' Institute, which was 
held in the Heading Boom, on Saturday 
evening last, when the Eamie and kindred 
textiles were under consideration. Being 
a special meeting of tho members of the 
Institute, tho action of the Board of Direc- 
tors in electing W. W. Hanscomb to fill a 
vacancy caused by the resignation of 
George Hickox, was duly ratified. W. B. 
Ewer, from the committee on the Poly- 
technic Branch, reported progress and 
stated that there would be a fuller report 
mado at the next meeting. 

Dr. Joseph Silver's paper on the Eamie 
plant, as adapted to California,was then read. 
The exhibition of specimens, and various 
articles of manufacture from it, with ex- 
planations, questions and remarks bearing 
thereupon, occupied about half of the 
evening. "The Eamie is the China or sea 
grass, of which summer coats were sold and 
worn by us fifty years ago — called Ortie de 
la Chine by the French, and botanically 
specified under the varieties of Urtica 
Niven, Urtica candicans, and Behmeria iena- 
cissima, the latter being the kind which is 
supplanting cotton in Louisiana and Texas. 

Dr. Silver stated that Henry Hughes, an 
English importer, in San Francisco, has 
received from alarge manufacturer of Brad- 
ford, Yorkshire, specimens of new and pe- 
culiarly attractive goods, made by inter- 
weaving Eamie, instead of silk, with wool — 
Eamie forming the chain. The same post 
brought instructions to order from China 
one hundred tons of sea grass, or Eamie, 
to be shipped to England; and to follow it 
up by regular invoices thereafter. Mr. 
Hughes was requested to order at the same 
time a large quantity of the seed for Cali- 
fornia. The letter requests that every ef- 
fort be made to induce our farmers to cul- 
tivate this most valuable plant, because it 
is about to be a leading staple for goods of 
many new varieties. Mr. Hughes has or- 
dered an ample supply of seed for wide 
distribution in this State, and he will buy or 
make advances on all the Eamie fiber that he 
can get. The planting and plowing are 
like corn, the soil is best sandy; the har- 
vesting isdonewith the machete, likehemp. 

The planter does up the fiber in hanlss 
for market. It is then raw fiber, worth ten 
cents a pound in gold. Preparing it for 
the factory is a separate industry. It has 
to be worked over, made fine and bleached, 
when it loses one-half of its weight. It 
is then worth sixty cents per pound, and it 
commands an active market at all times. 

In soil, not over twelve feet from perma- 
nent water, it will probably stand three cut- 
tings without irrigation in ordinary years. 
Deep-plowed ground in the foot-hills, well 
saturated by winter and spring irrigation, 
natural and artificial, may stand two heavy 
cuttings without summer watering. Low- 
lands make coarest fiber but largest crops. 

Manufacturers say that it will, by rather 
rapid advances, effect great and radical 
changes in the styles of woolen and worsted 
combinations, known as stuff goods, where 
its great strength makes it a substitute for 
silk, and that it will be very largely inter- 
woven with siik itself, as in Japan and 
India, forming very desirable dress goods. 
It offers to our agriculturists, in seasons of 
ordinary rains, a sure source of permanent 
profit, relieving them from the uncertain- 
ties of dependence upon exclusive grain 
production. Finally, our success in woolen 
goods leaves no reason to doubt our ability 
to manufacture cloth from Eamie, not only 
by itself, but in the various combinations 
of which it is susceptible. 

The samples of raw fiber exhibited were 
about six feet in length, of a color re- 
sembling hemp. A sample of raw fiber, 
freed from the gummy substance, and 
ready for marketing, was slightly lighter 
in color, and done up in skeins or bolts. 
It is this quality which is worth ten cents 
per pound, which price is paid in New Or- 
leans by exporters, and which will be com- 
manded here as soon as sufficient quanti- 
ties are produced. 

In the preparation of the fiber the stalk 
is first soaked in water for a few hours, 
then passed through a brake similar to a 
hay-brake, to divest it of the woody por- 



tion of the Btalk. It is then soaked in 
water again, and is again passed through 
the brake, freeing it partially from gum. 
The third soaking in water takes nearly all 
the gum out, when it is passed through a 
brake again. It is then ready for bleaching 
in the ordinary way, with chlorine. 

The time for planting is at the com- 
mencement of the rainy season, — Novem- 
ber. 

A gentloman present exhibited n sample 
of fiber from a species of milk- weed, which 
grows wild in large quantities in tho San 
Joaquin Valley, whence it was brought by 
Frank Howard. It was pronounced by Dr. 
Silver and other judges present to be highly 
valuable as a textile. The doctor stated 
that on the Humboldt Eiver at the crossing 
of the railroad, there were thousands of 
acres of wild hemp, which were, in his 
opinion, fully as valuable as the Eamie. 
He Bent a large quantity of it to Mr. Tubbs, 
of the San Francisco Cordage Factory, who 
pronounced it superior, and offered to pay 
$80 per ton for all that could be furnished. 
The doctor, however, thought it best to en- 
courage the cultivation of the Eamie, for 
the reason that it was already seated iu 
commerce. 

Dr. Silver has made arrangements so as 
to be able to supply all who wish, with 
cuttings and roots, which he is obtaining at 
New Orleans. They will cost here in coin 
about what they cost there in currency. 
Once planted, the Eamie is perennial. 

The President stated that the next paper 
will be read at the next regular monthly 
meeting, on the first Tuesday of next 
month, and will be on the subject of " Ex- 
plosives." 



Humboldt Mines. 

Mr. A. J. Knapp has shown for several 
days at the office of the California Mutual 
Life Insurance Co., a bar of 96 ounces of 
silver worked at Reno, from 2, 800 pounds 
of ore out of the above named mine. The 
mine is a new one, located five miles from 
Oreana. A tunnel has been run about 50 
feet along the ledge, and the rock worked 
came from the face of the tunnel from one 
to eighteen feet from the surface. The 
proprietors are sanguine of soon develop 
ing a permanently paying mine.. The 
Piute is a copper mine, near Oreana, Nev. 

The ore is chiefly fahl-ore and azurite. 
A specimen presented to us contains $49 
silver, and 25 per cent, copper. Half a ton 
of similar ore is at present at W. A. Hol- 
comb & Co's warehouse, San Francisco. 



American Inventors and English Pat- 
ent Agents. — In another column will be 
found an extract from the London Engi- 
neer in regard to the multitude of ignorant 
and irresponsible patent agents with which 
London swarms at the present time. The 
American Artisan quotes the language of the 
aforesaid journal, and makes the following 
pertinent remarks: " It behooves American 
inventors who desire to secure English pa- 
tents to be on their guard against London 
patent agents, only known to them by ad- 
vertising circulars, who are likely to entrap 
the unwary by their pretence of possessing 
peculiar advantages, and offer to do the 
business on very low terms, but afterwards 
surprise their clients by additional charges. 
Every person desiring to take a patent in 
England should — if he employs an English 
agent directly — be fully satisfied of his 
qualifications and character; but he will 
find it safer to do his business through an 
American agent of good standing, who, for 
the sake of his own reputation, will take 
care to employ only a properly qualified 
and reliable agent in England." 

We need scarcely add, — "We Concur." 
[Eds. Press. 

The Copper Market. — Copper, on the 
1st instant, had declined somewnat in the 
New York market, under the influence of 
forced sales. Lake Superior was quoted at 
21%c. ; Baltimore, 22c, with moderate 
demand. There was no disposition to buy 
even at these prices, on speculation. 



42 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July IT, 1869. 



Professional Cards- 
Notice To Mining Companies. 

The undersigned offers his services to the mining public. 
Having devoted several years to the study ot miiuog and 
metallurgy iu some 01 the best schools and works or 
Europe and being acquainted with the metallurgical treat- 
ment of ores as practiced on this coast, he is confident ol 
his ability to render valuable aid to parties employing hun. 

Address, care of Mining and Scientific Press. 23vl« 

J. S. PHILLIPS, M. K, 

CONSULTING ENGINJBEB, 

Examiner of Mines, etc., 

4*3 Washington street San Francisco. 

(Having had 33 years' experience in Europe and America.) 
supplies drawings and designs for Pumping, Hoisting, 
Crushing Separating, Roastiug. Chlorinizi.ig, Milling, Lix- 
iviating, .Precipitating, and Smelling U orbs. Minerals an- 
alyzed, and adrice given for beneficial treatment. Les- 
sons on the Discrimination and Assay of Minerals by Blow- 
pipe, Chemicals, Seorifier and Crucible. 4vl/tl 

GEORGE B. ELLERY, 
Practical Mining Engineer, 

TREASURE CITY, 



JOHN EOAOH, Optician, 

Has removed from 522 Montgomery street to 

54tO "Washington street. 

East of Montgomery. 



J-AJMEES BX. TAYLOR, 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 

Court Block, 636 Clay Street 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
2vl5-lqy 



GILES U. GKAY. 



JIMUS M. HAVBK. 



GRAY & HAVEN, 

ATTORSE YS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW, 

In Building of Pacific Insurance Co., N. E. corner Cali- 



27vl6 



folnia ano Leidesdord streets, 
SAN FKANCISCO. 



R. G. ROWLEY, 

ATTORNEY AHS COUNSELOR AT LAW, 

618 Merchant street, 
Between Montgomery and Kearny. P. O. Box 2102, San 
Francisco. lvlBtf 

DR. KNOWLES, Dentist, 

HAS REMOVED FROM MONTGOMERY 
.to 331 Kearny street, west side, between 
KPine and Busn, San Francisco. 
21vl8-ly 



[J^ MEUSSDORFFER, jj^ 
HLA.T MANUFACTURER 

And dealer in 

Hats and Caps 

AT WHOLESAJLi: ASD BETAIL. 

635 and 637 Commercial street San Francisco. 

lib J street Sacramento. 

Comer of D and Second streets Msrysville. 

72 Kront street Portland, Oregon. 

Our wholesale House, 628 Commercial street, extending 
through to 637 Clay street. Sun Francisco, contains always 
a most choice, and the largest, assortment in this State. 
Every Steamer brings the latest issued novelties from Eu 
rooe and New Tork, which can be found at all the above 
stores, at moderate prices. 23vl6-3m 



PACIFIC 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF SAN FKANCISCO, CAL., 

Office, No. 422 California street. 



Ca-.li Assets, Jan. 1, 1800, 

FIRE, 

MARINE, 



■ S1,530,T10 IS 



IIVSJTJJK.AIS'CE. 



*r« Fratisco: 
W. C. Ralsiouj 
A L. Tm.bs. 
AWu. Alvoi'd, 
Jutiathau llunu 
A. B. Forbes, 
A. (i. Stiles, 
A. seligmau, 
L. B. rtenctiley, 
W m. Sherman, 
L. t-aehs, 

James lie Fremcrv 
J. G. Bray, 
l)a\id S ein, 
i>. O. Mills, 
I. Friedlandcr, 
Moses Heller, 
j..M xewJiall, 
0. 1. Lawton, 
Miles L>- Sweeny, 
Ciias. Mavtie, 
E. L. Uoldstciu. 
J. O.Earl, 
L.Ui%d i'evis, 
Thos.H. Suluy" 
Adam Grant, 
Aipheus Hull, 
S. M. Wilson, 
U.J. Oliver, 
W. Seholle, 
Thos. Brown, 
Chas. -Muin, 
Chas. Routers,! 



DIRECTOKS: 

Oliver Eldridgc, 
J. H. Roberts, 
J. O. Wilmerding, 
1'. L. Weaver, 
w m. Hi oper, 
J. W.Chuk, 
A. Huvward, 
T.L Barker, 
Alexander Weill, 
Otias. Alever, 
Chas. E.McLano, 
M. Roscubaum, 
a. J. Ralston. 
T. Lemmen Meyer, 
J. T. Deau. 

Khw Yokk: 
Louts JlcLanc, 
Frederick Billings, 
Jmnes Lees, 
J. G. Kellocg, 
Win. T. Coleman, 
Moses Ellis. 

SaCKambnto: 
Edgar Mills, 

t J. u. Carroll, 
C. T. Wheeler, 

Makv.-vi[.i.(. : 
.1. H.Jewctt, 

Portland, Oregon: 
W. S Ladd, 
Jacob K.uiiin. 

ViKutNiA, Nevada: 

_"Win. Sharon. 

OFFICKRf ! 



JONA. HUNT, President. 

W. ALVoHD, Vice President' 
A. J. RALSTON. Secretary. 
ANDREW BAlI.lt, Marine Seerctarv. 
4vSUf U. H BIGELOW, Gcn'l Agent 



Metallurgy, 



MOSHEIMER'S 

PIONEER MINING- SCHOOL, 

— AND— 

BEETjULX*17KCtIC wokks. 

Having established the first Practical Mining and Metal- 
lurgical School in the United States, I would call the at- 
tention of gentlemen who may wish to obtain a practical 
knowledge of 

Chemistry, Assaying and Metallurgy, 

That I am prepared to teach all the above branches in les 
time than in any European School. 

I also undertake to assay and work any kind of ore, or 
mineral substances. 

For terms, apply to JOS. JIOSHETJIEU, 

Practical Chemist and Metallurgist. 

Office, 323 Montgomery street; Metallurgic Works, 2005 
Powell street, San Francisco 6vl8-6m 



LEOPOLD KUH. 
Assayer and Metallurgical Chemist, 

(Formerly of the U. S. B. Mint, S. F.) 

Office, No, Cll Commercial Street, opposite 

the Stint, San Francisco. 

BULLION MELTED AND ASSAYED, 
Tne correctess of which is guaranteed in every respect 
AH kinds of Ore and Mineral tested, assayed andanalj-zed 
in the most satisfactory manner. 

Refers by permission to W. C. Ralston, Cashier Bank oi 
California; Messrs Pioche & Bayerque, Wm. M. Lent, John 
D. Fry, E. Cahill & Co., A. K. Grim, President Pacific Union 
Express Co.; John M. Eckfeldt, M. and R. U. S B. Mint; 
Hale & Norcross S. M. Co., and the principal mining com- 
panies ou the Comstock Lode. 25vl7-tf 



PROF. HENRY "WURTZ, 

Formerly Chemical Examiner in the U. S. Patent Office 
maj' be employed professionally as a Scientific Extort. 
Geological Examinations and Reports, Anal vsis and Assays, 
etc., etc. Practical advice and investigations in the f'hem 
ical Arts and Manufactures. Invention and examination 
of new chemical methods *md products. Address, 26 Pine 
street, Rooms 35 and 36, New York. Always in from 12 to 
3.30. iEtf* Written communications preferred. 

Important to G-old and Silver Min- 
ers and Companies. 

PROFESSOR WTJRTZ, 

Wholsthe Inventor and Patentee of the new and wonder 
fill uses of SODIUM IN WORKING GOLD AND SILVER 
ORES AND JEWELERS" SWEEPINGS, will furnish at the 
above address n for mat ion in relation thereto, together 
with experimental packages of 

SODIUM AMALCAM. 

AH Instructions and experiments elsewhere obtained are 
spuriousand unreliable. WORKING EXPERIMENTS ON 
AMALGAMATION OF ORES, Ktc. Prof. W. has in opera 
tion in New York a large, and small Hepbur" Pan, for work 
intr 1,01)0 or 20-lb. charges oi material lor experiment,-! 
purposes. 3vl7-ly 



R. TAYLOR. WM. H. TAYLOR. 

ROBERT TAYLOR & CO., 

METALLURGISTS. 

SMELTING WORKS, 

Twelfth street* between Folsom and Howard, 

GA JLTVAJXITZTNG. 

Also, Anti-Friction, Alloys for Journals, Type 

and Stamping Metals, Tinners and 

Plumbers' Solder, Etc. 

OSf-The hest price Riven for the most rebellious or re- 
fractory ores. Ores ami minerals assayed and analyzed. 
ISAAC BLIXOHE. Agent, 
4vlS 3m N. K. cor. Washington and Battery streets. 



G-. W. STRONG-, 

ASSAYER AND WORKER OP ORES, 

No. 10 Stevenson street, near First.San Francisco. 

Highest price paid for choice lots of Ores, Sulphuiet^, as 
say Ashes, S«eepin»s, etc , etc. Studemsiustrncted inali 
branches of Metallurgy , on liberal teruis. 
14vl5nr. 



OCCIDENTAL 

Insurance Company? 

OF SAN FKANCISCO. 
Ca-.li Capital, ...... $300,000 

GOLD COIN. 

Office S. "W. corner of Montgomery and 
California streets. 

Fire an cl Marine Insurance. 

All Losses paid in U. S. Gold Coin. 

CHR. CHRISTIANSEN, President 
B Rothschild, Secretary' 20vl7-3m 



Business Cards. 



RODG-ERS, MEYER & CO., 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

ADTASCES MADE 
On nli kinds of Ores, and particular attention 

PAID TO 

tlBSlCSSlESTS OF GOODS. 
4Yl6-3m 



C ABD PICTURES, 

ONE DOLLAR PER DOZEN. 

And Photographs. Ambrotypes and Sun Pearls, by first 

class artists, at the lowest rates, 

At SItTA'8, GA Third Street, 

Northwest corner of Mission, ----- San Francisco. 

Ilvl8-3m 



KATB .UltL GRAY. H. M. GRAY. 

N. GRAY & CO., 

UNDER T .A. 351 33 R. 8 , 

641 Sacramento St, cor. Webb, San Francisco. 

egy-Sole Agents for Barstow's Metallic Burial Cases and 
25vl4tf ' Caskets. 



Farmers and Mechanics 
B^TSTK OF SAVINGS, 

So, 335 Saniome Street. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Money Loaned on Seal Estate. 
H. BUTTON, President. 

GEO. M. CONDEE Cashier. 19vl6-3m 



To Quartz Mining Companies. 

To be sold positively within tlie next throe months— the 
MINES, ENGINE, MILL, and entire Machinery of the 
TEMFLAR NO. 2 Quartz Mining Company, located nt lu- 
diana lianch, Yuba County, consisting of— 

One Steam Bneine, W horcc power, made by Burden, 
BrookUn. New York.. 

Two large Boilers, in complete order. 

One Eipht-stamp Battery. 

One Chile Mill. 

one Cornish Lift-Pump, 6 inches, of superior make and 
finish. 

2S0 I'eet or.*» inch Iron Suction Pipe. 

One large Water Tank. 

And also ail of the necessary machinery, with Bcltms?, 
Feed Pumps, Hose, Turn Tables, Cars, Ropes, Track Iron. 
Flumes, Plates, with Blacksmith Shop and all Touls and 
requisite implements to be found in a large and flrst class 
quartz mill. 

I'tie Cum i any havin? censed operations intend selling off 
their etlVris iis'speedily as possible. 

For Particulars as to price, eu-„ address, l>y letter or 
otherwise. L. \Y. CaMPEK, at Tndi.ini Kftnch; GEORGE 
B. K0RN1S1I. Marvsville; or E. \Y. IIAS1CELL. ra,Ciflc 
Fruit Market, San Francisco. 24vl6-lm 



M. S. BUCKKLEW. 



GK0. LAMB. 



BUCKELEW & CO., 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Choice Teas, Groceries and Provisions. 

520 Market street. 
Below Montgomery street 17vl8-3m 



"W. T. ATWOOD, 



PURCHASER OT 



OOPPEE OKES, BAE3, MATT Etc, Eto„ 

."tO."> Montgomery street. San Franclaco. 

The highest market price paid for ores assaying 10 per cent. 
and upwards 23vl7qr 



Farms and City Property. 

C. IT. WAEEIEG <fc CO., 

601 California street, S. W. Corner Kearny street, buy and 
sell Farms and City Real Estate. Parties wishing to invest 
will llud it to their interest to call on the . 13rl8-3m 



Pump Leather. 

The attention of MINING COMPANIES, and others re- 
quiring a superior article for Hydraulic purposes, is invited 
to the heavy Oaked Tanned Pump Leather, manufactured 
and prepared expressly by the undersigned. 



x E.JONES&C? / 



Constantly on hand and for sale by 

OI5.A.Y, JONES «Sfc CO., 

Depot of the Santa Cruz Tannery, 
418 Battery St., San. Francisco. 

25vl7-ly 



SULPHTJEET8 ; 

What they are; 

How Assaved ; 

How Concentrated; 

And How Worked; 

With a Chapter on the 

BLOW-PIPE ASSAY OF MINERALS. 

By WM. BARSTOW, M. D. 

Published by A. Roman & Co,, San Franclseo. 
For sale at this Offlce.—Prlce, One Dollar. 

With the aid of this Book, the miner can assay his ova 
ores, requiring but few materials, etc., except such as are 
generally to be found in the interior towns. 21vl5tf 



Trades and Manufactures. 



WM. BARTLIKG. 



HENBT KIMBALL. 



BARTLING & KIMBALL, 
BOOICBIl^X>]EItS, 

Paper Bulers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

5*3 Clay street, (southwest tor. Sansome), 
I5vl2-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



•JOHN DATflEL., 

(SUCCESSOR TO O. GORl) 

MARBLE WORKS, 

No. 421 Pine st. bet Montgomery and Kearny, San Francisco 

Mantels, Monument'., Tombs, Plumberm'SlKbo. 
Etc., On hand and Manufactured to order. 
9^- Goods shipped to all parts of the State. Orders re ? 
spectfulli solicited. 6v8-3m 



For Miners, Millmen and Metallurgists. 

KUSTEL'S NEW WORK, 
OONOEilVTR^VTIO:^ 

Of all kinds of Ores, and the 

CELORIWATIOM PROCESS, 

For Gold-Beariog Sulphurets, Arsemurets, and Gold and 
Silver Ores generally. 

Price, - S7.SO 



A liberal discount to the Trade. For sale by the Booksellers 

Scut to any part of tho United States, postage paid, 

on receipt of the price. Address, 

UEWEY <&; CO., I*Ti1>lisliers, 

Office of the Mining and Scientific Press, Hi Clay street' 
lovltf SAN FRA1SCISC0. 



J. M. STOCKMAN, 

Manufacturer of 
PATTEBN8 AND MODELS, 

(Over W. T. Garratt's Brass Foundry, 
S. £. Corner of Mission and Fremont sts., 
6vHtf SAN FKANCISCO 



feS-A-If FRANCISCO 1HI3L.X.. 

HOBBS, GILMORE & CO., 
Manufacturers oi Boxes, 

AIurk.et Street, bet. Benle and Main. 



J. J. JONES, 

CARPENTER and UTTIDL^EIt, 

No. 'Vil Jackson street, "between Sansome and 

Battery, 

Stores and Offices fitted un with neatness and dispatch. 
7vl8tf 



W. C. CAMPBELL. 

PATTERN AND MODEL, MAKER, 

No. SO Fremont street, over Phoenix Iron Works, San 

Francisco. 
Particular attention given to MODELS for the Patent Office 



Brands and Pattern Letters Cut. 



■ivlSmtf 



J. F. PAGES, 

SSAIj ENGRAYER, 
AND LETTEX CTJTTElt, 

Brass and Steel Stamps and Oies, GO 8 Sacramento street, 

San Fr Ail Cisco. Orders hy express promptly attended to. 

6vl6 



DESKS AND OFFICE FURNITURE. 
JOHNSON~& BEST, 

Manufacturers of aD kinds of 

X>eslts and. Office ITxirnitiire, 

7X7 Market street, ne«i\TIiIru, up Stalm. 

"Warerooms, 413 Pine street, Kuss Block, 

A large variety of Desks always od hand; all kinds of Office 
Furniture and Cabinet Work made to order. 



SAN FKANCISCO 

I*ioneei" Screen Works, 

JOHN W. QUICK, Manufacturer, 

Removed to A. PritzePs Iron Works, 203 Fremont street, 
near Howard, San Francisco. 

Screen Punching in all its branches, at rates reduced 
from 25 to 4'i per cent less than the established rates. I can 
furnish Improved Quartz Screens several sizes finer than 
anv Screen ever punched, giving universal satisfaction, 
anil for strength, cheapness ami ilurp.hilily are not excelled. 
Also, Punched (Screens of all sizes and fineness made from 
all qualities ot material, for Quartz. Cement, Flour and 
Rice Mills, etc. Screen Punching made a specialty; there- 
fore millmen forwarding their orders to me will receive 
none l>ut the best. Orders solicited. 

N- B —J. W. QUICK is the only competent and successful 
manuiacturer of Screens in the State, having made Screens 
fortlie principal nulls in this State and adjoining Terri- 
tories for many years. Quartz null owners using punched 
Screens which have universally failed to give satisfaction, 
when visiting the city will please call a.»d see me 5vl7-Iy 



Pacific Chemical Works. 

STJXPIITJR1C ETHEK. 

SPIRITS OF NITRE, 
AQUA AMMONIA, 
ACETIC ACID, 

CYANIDE OF POTASS ICM 

— AND — 
ACIDS AND CHEMICALS OF ALL KINDS. 

FALKENAU & HANKS. 

Office and Laboratory, Sixteenth street, be- 
tween PolMoni and Harrlnon. 

LOUIS FALKENAU, Stafte Assayer. 
jBSf-Pa r tic ula r attention paid to tho Analysis of ORES, 
MINERALS, METALS, etc. 8vl7 



THE GIANT 

POWDEB COMPANY 

Is now prepared to fill all orders for 

GIANT POWDER, 

Pat np In Boxes, either in Jtulk or In Car 

triages. 

General Agents, 

BAKDMANW, NIELSEN fe CO., 

25vl6-3m 210 Front street, San Francisco. 



Postmastkrs are requested to punctually inform us of the 
removal of suhscrihers ol' the Press from their locality, 
or of neelecttn take tlie paper out of the ofhee from any 
pause— when the subscriber omits that duty himself. It is 
not our intention to send this journal to any puny longer 
than it is desired- If we inadvertently do so, subscribers 
and others wn! pleaae inform us. 



July 17, 1869.] 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



43 



Items of Patent Law. 

Thi? head of the American Patent Office, 
Mr. Fisher, has recently reversed a de- 
cision on appeal from the Board of Exam- 
iners in Chief on the strength of the point 
that in examining applications of patents 
there should be considered the question of 
utility rather with regard to the purpose 
of the invention than to tho means of ac- 
complishing it. The purposo proposed, if 
accomplished, mnst be useful, and the plan 
must not show tho absouco of somo part 
obviously essential to tho ond. 

A suit has been brought against tho Gov- 
ernment itself for infringing on gun pat- 
ent*, nt Springfield. In devising the model 
of the new army gun, tho Government has 
taken what were believed to be the simplest 
and best features of breeeh-loading guns 
wherever it could find them, without stop- 
ping to consider whether they were pat- 
ented or not, being determined to secure 
the most perfect scheme attainable for mak- 
ing breech-loaders. 

In this manner it appears quite a num- 
ber of patents Iihvo been infringed upon. 
Col. A. 15. Ely of Boston, claims the Pres- 
ton patent breech-lock. An injunction is 
pending. 

On the rejection of an application for a 
patent, Mr. Fisher has decided that if the 
application bo not renewed within two 
years after withdrawal its continuity is 
broken. Before the repealing act of 1861 
there existed a provision of law whereby 
rejected applicants were permitted to with- 
draw their applications and receive back 
two-thirds of the fee. Numerous applica- 
tions of this kind have beon reversed, and 
patents touching these same inventions and 
points therein, have since been granted. 

In the English PatentOffice, recently, an 
intending patentee had lodged a provis- 
ional specification, whon another inventor 
filed one of a similar description, and pro- 
cured his patent to be the first sealed. The 
former complained of this, and argued that 
under the circumstances the Attorney-Gen- 
eral should not have allowed the second 
person to file his patent. The Lord Chan- 
cellor, however, pointed out that there was 
no law to compel a person who had filed a 
provisional specification to proceed "with 
his invention, and if the applications of other 
parties were to be uniformly rejected, the 
country might be deprived of the fruits of 
the ingenuity of many minds which were 
working in the same direction. 



Three-fourths of the " Girdle" Almost 
Completed. — Opportunely with the grand 
opening of the Pacific Railway, comes 
news of the progress made by the East 
India Telegraph Co. coupling Canton with 
Calcutta, London and New York. By the 
end of the year, as the sanguine Americau 
conductors of the enterprise give to be un- 
derstood, the line will be completed. San 
Francisco will then send her news for 
China east, and her ships west; will trans- 
mit orders for teas and silks three-fourths 
of the way around the globe in a moment, 
and will receive the shipments from an op- 
posite direction, in little over a fortnight. — 
Jf. Y. Tribune. 



GEO. E. ROG-ERS, 

(Successor to Q. W. Bell.) 

A. S S A. Y E X£ , 

518 CallToroliL fit., San Francisco. 

J. A. MARS, Apsaycr. 

Ores carefully Assayed. Gold and silver Ores worked. 

;UvlO-qrlupnr 



C .AJL I TT O RIV I A. 

BUSINESS UNIVERSITY 

SOI Montgomery Street. 

Full particulars regarding o*ir Practical Course of Studle 
miy r>e hart by calling at tin- Universiiy, or In- addresslne 
llvll qylip E. P. HKALD, San Francisco. 



Blake's Patent. T?f ed ^ s B T „„ P X P s» f S. r r B H°S 

en, TonnerliH, Mining end Fire pur- 
poses, etc., is Blnke'B 

ISfPUMP 

It ifl BIMTLB, OOBPJCT QIKi I-OirEItrCk 

needs no expert to ion it. ond will 
start at any point, la warranted 
fokititr under rill ri re nm stance*. 
Send for a circular. W. 0. M. 
JIIORRY b. CO.. 114 California St., 
PranciscQ, Cal. 




Mining Secretary. 



THE SUBSCRIBER, HAVING SERVED FOR THE LAST 
nve years as Secretary of various mining companies, 
feels fully competent to serve In that capacity. Any par- 
ties wishing to secure the services of a Secretary can be 
accommodated on reasonable terms. Information given, 
and all necessary papers correctly made out. 

Having had a [our experience in the purchasing or goods 
and niacliinery lor miners, parties in the mines will tind it 
to their advantage, where purchasing agents are employed, 
tu send their orders 10 the umleraUued. 

J. M, BUFFIMUTON, 
ttonai S7 New Merchants' Exchange, California t-treet, 
Sail Francisco 17vl5-U 



OAELOS O'DONNELL'S 

California Cordial Tonic, 

—OR— 

Wild Cliei-i-y Bittex-s. 

TRADE C. 0. D. MARK. 



Thlt elegant preparation I* acknowledged by all who have 
used It to b« the must efficient romedy tor every disease of 
the 

STOMACH AXD BOWELS, 

V.'i lul r...l U.-..I tn the indlce of Hie public. Immediately on 
taking B dow Of it, the patient will llnd a genial glow per- 
vading his entire system, and Its steady use for a short 
lime will br followed by a healthy nppetlle and a good di- 
gestion, even in the 0486 of the most coullruicd dyspeptic. 
To all wli.uire suffering from 

INDIGESTION, 

DYSPEPSIA, 

DYSENTERY, 

DIARRII'KA,' 

NERVOUS AFFECTIONS, 

Ornnyof the manifold troubles caused by a diseased action 
of the stomach, this remedy la confidently recommended 
as a safe and certain cure. 

N. B. JACOBS & CO., Sole Agents, 
15vl3-3m 433 Front »treel, Snn FrauclMco. 



HO TEAMSTERS! 

CONTINUE TO 

USE HDCKS & UIIEirS 

CELEBRATED 

H & L Axle Grease s 

To which you have given so decided a 
preference fur the last 

FOURTEEN YEARS, 

It is the only reliable article 

IN THE MARKET 

Every care will continue ts be upocI to pus- 

taia the high reputation the II & L Axle 

Grease, has so long and justly attained. 

Jt&~Be sure and ask for the II & L brand, 
and Fee that the 

TRADE MARK H & L 

IS ON THE COVER OP THE PACKAGE 

HONE OTHER IS GENUINE. 
FOB SALE LV EVERY STATE IS THE UHM 



WINDMILL 

For Sale Cheap ! 



Entirely Sfew and of Modern iuul Approved 
Style. 

For particulars apply to or address this office. 



California Steam Navigation 

S^S COMPANY. 



...CAPT. E. A. POOLE 
....CAPT. A. FOSTER. 



Steamer CAPITAL 

CHRYSOPOLIS.. 

" VOSEMITE 

CORNELIA CAPT. W. BROMLEY 

JULIA CAPT. E. CONCKLIN. 

Two of the above steamers leave BROADWAY WHARF 
at 4 o'clock P. M. EVERY DAY {Sundays excepted), one 
for Sacramento and one tor Stockton, those for Sacra- 
mento connection with light-draft steamers for Maryavlllo 
Cnlptfi. Cliicn, and Red Bluff. 

Office of the Company, northeast corner of Front and 
Jackson streets. 

B. M. HAKTSHORVJE, 
'3vl2 President. 

THE CHARLES HARKNESS 
Patent W ax Oandles, 

Have now an established reputation on this Coast. Their 
uniform quality, much superior to any Adamantine Can- 
dies, Is 

Well Known to Miners. 

They burn longer and better than other kinds, and are 
really the mo3t economical Candles in the market. 
FREEMAN, SMITH & CO., 

HO California street. 
Manufacturers* ScIIIhr Agrcnt*. 21vl8-3m 



Blanks, Blank Mining Books 

Constitution and By-Laws 

— FOK — 

Mining: and Prospecting 
Companies 

Elegantly printed, with care and dispatch, at the office of tho 

Mining mini Scientific Press. 

Orders from the interior faiihfuiy attended to . 




Ayer's Cathartic Pills, 

purposes of a Laxative 

Perhaps no one medi- 
ome i- ao universally re- 
quired by everybody as 
n catbaroo, nor was ever 

any before so universal- 
ly adopted into use, in 
every country and among 
all classes, us tins mild 
nut ofllcicnt purgative 
Pill. Tho obvious rea- 
son is, that it is a more re- 
liable and far more efl'ec- 
" tual remedy than any 
other. Those who have 
tried it, know that it cured them; those who have 
not, know that it eurea their neighbors and friends, 
nnd all know that what it does once it does always 
— that it never fails tlirough any fault or neglect of 
its composition^ Wo have thousands upon thou- 
sands ot certificates of their remarkable cures of the 
following complaints, but such cures are known in 
every neighborhood] and we need not publish them. 
Adapted to all ages and conditions in all climates; 
containing neither calomel or any deleterious drug, 
they may be taken with safety by anybody. Their 
sugar coating preserves them over fresh and makes 
them pleasant to take, while being purely vegetable 
no harm can arise from their use in any quantity. 

They operate by their powerful influence on the 
internal viscera to purify the blood and stimulate it 
into healthy action — remove the obstructions of the 
stomach, bowels, liver, and other organs of tho 
body, restoring their irregular action to health, and 
by correcting, wherever they exist, such derange- 
ments as are the first origin of disease. 

Minute directions are given in the wrapper on 
the box, for the following complaints, which these 
I*ills rapidly cure : — 

For I>ytt]iepNia or Inflig-otion, Ufltless- 
new**, Iiang-nor and ■><►*>-. of Appetite, they 
should be taken moderately to stimulate the stom- 
ach and restore its healthy tone and action. 

For Xiver Complaint and its various symp- 
toms, BiliouH Heartache, Mick Headache, 
JTnumlice or Oreen Mickneaa, Jtilions 
Colic and BIIIoum Fevers, they should be ju- 
diciously taken for each case, to correct the diseased 
action or remove the obstructions which cause it. 

For DyNentery or Iftiurrlioea, but one mild 
dose is generally required. 

For ItheuniatlMni, <-onr, Gravel, Palpi- 
tation of the Heart, Pain in the Side, 
Back and Loins, they should be continuously 
taken, as required, to change the diseased action of 
the system. With such change those complaints 
disappear. 

For WrnjiNV and Dropsical Swelling* they 
should be taken in large and frequent doses to pro- 
duce the effect of a drastic purge. 

For Suppression a large dose should be taken 
as it produces the desired effect by sympathy. 

As a Dinner Pill, take one or two Pills to pro- 
mote digestion and relieve the stomach. 

An occasional dose stimulates the stomach and 
bowels into healthy action, restores the appetite, 
and invigorates the system. Hence it is often ad- 
vantageous where no serious derangement exists. 
One who feels tolerably well, often finds thatadose 
of these Pills makes him feel decidedly better, from 
their cleansing and renovating effect on the diges- 
tive apparatus. tst 
DR. J. C. A.TJEB & CO., Practical Chemists, 
X.OWEZZ. MASS., n. 8. A.. 

Sold by all druggists and dealers In medicine every- 
where. Crane & Hrlgham, San Francisco; R H McDon- 
ald & Co., Sacramento. General Agents. 25vl8eow4m 

Wonderful Invention!— To Housekeepers! 
NEW M MTEMM> OF 

WASHING CLOTHES 

WITHOUT LABOR. 
JOHN REIST'S Celebrated Patent Automatic 

CLOTHES WASHER AND BOILER. 



<-o, r 



XS I^Sf/S, ft £r> 



/^i .'■ 



'-> 




This Boiler is moat eflVictn.-il, reliable, an universally 
recommended; niid is the first SELF-ACTING, PORTABLE 
WASH BOILER, tor household purposes ever made, and 
strange to say, has never been improved, as nearly all olh- 
ers, "which are infringements," nave proved total fail- 
ures. See decision U. S. Patent Office, November d, 186S. 

See its wonderful operation and you cannot do without 
it. WM. FRIEL, Agent for Sau Francisco, 

Dealer In Stove and Tinware, 
2flvl 3m 67 and 69Fmmh st„ bet. Mission and Jessie sts. 



The Perfection of Prepared Cocoa. 

MARAVILJLA COCOA. 

Sole Proprietors— TAYLOR BROTHERS, London. 

The Cocoa (or Cacao) o"f Maravilla Is the true Thcobroma 
of Linurcus. Cocoa Is indigenous to South America, of 
which Maravilla U a favored portion. TAYLOR BROTH- 
ERS having secured the exclusive supply of this unri- 
valled Cocoa, have, by the skillful application of their sol- 
uble principle and elaborate mnclnncrv, produced what Is 
so undeniably the pencctioii ol Prepared Cocoa, that It has 
not only secured the prefe-enoc of no moo ■ pat ha and cocoa- 
drinkers generally, but many who had hi'lierto not found 
any preparation to suit them, have, after one trial, adopted 
the ftlaravilla Cocoa as their constant beverage lor break- 
fast, luncheon, etc. 

"A SUCCESS UNPRECEDENTED." 

[See following extract from the Globe of May 14, 18G8.] 
"Various importers and manufacturers have attempted 
to attain a reputation for their prepared Cocoas, but wo 
doubt whether any thorough success bad been achieved 
until Messrs. T >vlor Brothers discovered the extraordinary 
o,ualittes of "Maravilla" Cocoa. Adapting their perleet 
sy-teni of preparation to this linest of all species of the 
Theobroma, they have produced an article which super- 
sedes every other Cocoa In the market. Entire solubility, 
adelicate aroma, and a rare concentration of the purest 
elements of nutrition, distinguish the Maravilla Cocoa 
above all others. For hoinreopaths and invalids we could 
not recommend a more agreeable or valuable beverage. 

Sold In packets only byall Grocers, of whom also may 
be had Tavlor Brothers' urirrinnl Homoeopathic Cocoa and 
soluble Chocolate, Steam Mills. Brick Lane, London, 
6vl8-6m 




New Almaden Vichy Water, 

(CALIFORNIA VICHY WATER.) 

FltOMl THE JSIMilTVGrN, 

NEW ALMADEN, 

Santa. Clara Covinty. 

F. T.. A.PIOCIIE Proprietor. 

O. OIIAUVIN A K eut. 

OFFICE, o08 JACKSON STREET, 

GENERAL DEPOT: 
Corner of Jackoou nnd Montgomery strectM. 

This Mineral Water Is especially useful and verv power- 
ful, not only In the course of certain diseases, uutawo us ft 
preventive of intermittent lever, chronic rheumatism, 
gout, scrofula, general debility arlt-inir from disorder of Mic 
nervous system and circulation of the blood, and especially 
of the veluous circulation. 

It Is necessary to observe, In Ihls connection, that, since 
the action of this water Is very powerful, It must be used In 
cases of sickness with thk advhjk or a fhysician, frr 
there are cases wli-ro a patient could not make use of it 
with impunity, at least m the beginning of a course of 
treatment!*). On the other hand, the composition of Vichy 
Water renders it highly etlicacinus as an adjuvant to the 
action of certain medicines which, without It, could not lie 
digested, and would therefore remain ineffectual. It is a 
fact that, for some diseases, the action of tills Mineral 
Water cannot be emeacious without the use of certain imd- 
iclnes which the physician only can properly prescribe. 
The omission of that precaution is the reason why many 
patients do not find in mineral waters In general all tho 
relief they mlcht otherwise derive from them. 

California Vichy Water Is used with success in many 
cases, such as— 

Impoverishment of the Blood; Weakness of Nervous 
System; Chronic Inflammation of Liver, Stomach, Spleen, 
Spine, Womb, Intestines, Ovaries, and Inflammation gen- 
erally, when thtrrc ixvo frrrr: Dyspepsia in all Us stages; Loss 
of Appetite; Bad Digestion; Flatulency; Coi slant and Te- 
nacious Vomiting; weakness of certain Organs; the Indis- 
positions peculiar to Women; Frequent Lterine Hemor- 
rhage; Heniorrhoides; Obstruction of Liver and Spleen; 
Night Sweats; Chronic Rheumatism, ulirn without /ever; 
flout, when tin- pdi-imf it still uhli • (n irul/:; Gruvcl, Hlld in cases 
Of Diabetes, the New Almaden Vichy Water is a most pow- 
erful adjuvant to the remedies prescribed for this terrible 
disease. 

(») Besides its Medicinal qualities, this Mineral Water in 
a most agreeable beverage at meals, or at any time of the 
day, pure or mixed with Water, Beef Broth, Red Wine, 
White Wine, Champagne, Brnudv, Milk, etc. 

PRICE— 12 Bottles, at the General Depot, S4. Returned 
Bottles Bought for Five Cents apiece. 

Twenty-four Half Bottles, $5. Returned Bottles Bought 
for 50 cents per dozen. 25vlbtl 



Mining Property for Sale. 



-A- Two Thirds Interest 



Golden Rule Mining Company 's 

Claims an a JMjll, 
Situated In Tuolumne County, California, two and a half 
miles south of Jamestown, on the Great Mother Quartz 
Lode. A good 15-stamp Water Power Quartz Mill is situated 
on the property, with a never-failing supply of water, as 
can be shown by the last four years continual running. 
This Claim has three parallel Ledges, from 60 to 100 feet 
apart, averaging from two to six feet In width, with a length 
of six hundred feet. They are so situated that a tunnel has 
heen run through them at right angles, making a surface 
drainage of from seventy to eighty feet in depth on the 
mine. The mine Is well ventilated by shafts from the sur- 
face, and well limbered so far as woi ked. In the mine are 
Mcain Iloisiing Works, capable of hoisting from a depth of 
3C0feet. A force of thirteen men only are required to keep 
both mill and mine running regularly. 

On thesurfnee nnd flats for a distance of 500 feet from 
these veins, the ground or surface was mined by placer 
miners, in former vears, producing from two to five ounces 
per dav to the man, during the season when walercould bo 
obtained, which factgoes to prove that a heavy dcp< sii of 
ore was once contained in t lie crop pings ot these sbutcs, 
which, by all former nnd present theories of deep mine 
workings, came from below, indicating that when sunk 
upon to a proper depth, the lead will develop a nunc equal 
to the Amador or Eureka. 

This claim has paid Its 19th regular dividend of £1,500 
each, during the past four years, besides all the construc- 
tion and other expense arcouiit, and has levied no assess- 
ments during the same time, and at present has on hand 
Ss.iin.i in i he Treamrv, and no debts. 

The last level. 150 feet troin the surface rock, averaged 
$7 per ton. on which was a profit of from $1 to $1 60 per 
ton. The length ot the two shutes of ore on the east vein, 
and the onlv one worked upon, has been abnut ?00feet. 

Now I propose to sell two thirds of this valuable property 
for $16,000, cash; and any party who desires to purchase a 
property or this kind— which theory has proven that ii re- 
quires depth, on well known shules of ore, for a sure for- 
tune— can obtain a chance here, providing be or they will 
go down a sufficient depth. No purchaser is solicited un- 
less he first goes and examine the mine, or sendi a inlufmr 
engineer in whom he can have confidence, to indorse what 
he may think proper of what has been here stated 

For any further particulars direct by ietter to * m Bos- 
worth, San Francisco, P. O. Box 1078, or at my office, room 
No. 5, over Donoboc & Kelly's Bank. 
22vl8tfqr WM. BOSWOBTH. 



A Long Desired Article 

FOR CLEANING THE HEAD AXD Tf AIR. THE CLEAN- 
ing of the head and hair has heen the subject, of con- 
sideration for a long time. This object will be accomp ished 
by using 

CA3IILLI! CHAMPOO, 
which not only does away with the poor soap so offensive 
to use, and so injurious to the hair, but it cleans the bead, 
strengthens and beautifies the hair, preserves the color, 
and prevents boldness. It is cooling in nature, and enn be 
used with *afetv and reliance on the sittiille«t in r ant. Price 
fin cents per Dollle. Prepared bvEMERTONi LUELLING, 
TfSMlssi.-m street. San Kranciseo, Cal. 

HEATH i'TF.LD A BOGLE, Wholesale Druggists, 20G 
and SOS Battery street, San Francisco, sole Agents for the 
Pacific Coast. 21vl8-3ni 



44 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 17, 1869. 



Familiar Scietice. 



Food, and How to Eat It. 

Cabbage, parsnips, beets, cucumbers and 
onions, are very indigestible, and should 
never be eaten by persons who are troubled 
•with a weak stomach. 

Tomatoes, apples and similar kinds of 
fruit should also be eaten by such persons 
with caution, although they are very easily 
digested. Such food, when eaten by dys- 
peptics, is apt to produce intense acidity 
of the stomach, — followed by sick head- 
ache, heartburn, etc. ; milk will often pro- 
duce the same effect. Potatoes, beans and 
green peas are excellent food, provided they 
are boiled very soft; but even they must 
be eaten sparingly. 

The reason of all this is found in the un- 
healthy condition, and consequent slowness 
of action of the digestive organs, which, 
with dyspeptics, (those troubled with sour 
stomachs) is so slow that such food runs 
into acidity before digestion is effected;, 
then, of course, comes sour stomach, pain i 
in the bowels, sick headache, etc. In the 
case of beans and peas the mischief is 
mainly attributable to the indigestible skin 
with which they are covered. A bean 
swallowed whole will no more digest than 
will a cherry stone or a ballast ttone. 

Good fermented bread, and a tender 
juicy steak, if well masticated, will seldom 
turn to acidity. "When the stomach is very 
•weak, dispense with the meat, and toast 
the bread. Flour, somewhat coarsely bolted, 
is better than very fine flour; it does not 
turn to acidity so soon, and lays easier, in 
every way, upon the stomach. Very coarse 
Graham Hour and bran, however, should be 
avoided; such food irritates the tender 
coating of the stomach and bowels, thereby 
causing a watery effusion and purgation — 
it operates very much like castor oil, only 
it irritates more, and in that respect is 
worse. 

Mastication is one of the greatest causes 
of indigestion. No food should enter the 
stomach until it has been reduced to afiue, 
soft pulp, free from lumps, by the action 
of the teeth and saliva. A close observ- 
ance of this rule, and a bread diet, to be- 
gin with, will in time cure almost any dys- 
peptic. 

Don't Run Up Stairs. 

Don't run up stairs; there is no need of 
it — unless the house is on fire, or some 
other dread calamity impending. Ladies 
don't run in the street, nor iu the hall ; why 
then should they run up stairs, and then 
complain because it is such hard work, or 
because the stairs are so high? There is as 
much philosophy in getting up stairs, as 
there is in hoisting a bale of goods into an 
upper story. It is no more difficult to go 
up stairs than it is to do any other kind of 
work, if you only take the proper time for 
it. In going up stairs you have not only 
the forward motion of walkiDg to accom- 
plish; but you have also to hoist some 130 
or 170 pounds to the hight of the flight. 
This latter is work, and you must take time 
for it, just as the man does when he hoists 
an equal weight of merchandise to the up- 
per floor. See how slow it rises; it is no 
harder work to do that, than it is to per- 
form any other labor, if he takes his time 
for it — and the workman generally does 
that. 

There is really but little more difficulty 
in ascending a flight of stairs, than there 
is in walking three times the distance in a 
straight line, if we only take about the 
same time to ascend, that we should in 
walking three times the distance of ascent. 
Walk up stairs slowly; rest at each landing, 
(and there should always be a landing, at 
least as often as every ten feet of elevation ) 
and you will reach the top without exhaus- 
tion or fatigue. 



Continental Life Insurance Co., 302 Mont- 
gomery street, corner of Pine. 



jTnventions and ^Patents. 



New Patents Issued to Pacific Coast 
Inventors. 

[Feom Official Reports to DEWEY & CO., TJ. S. and 

Fokeign Patent Agents, and Publishers of 

the Mining and Scientific Press.] 

Copies of TJ. S. Patent Claims fumisJted immedi- 
ately at small cost. Full copies of American or 
Foreign Patents can be obtained by telegraph or 
mail through this office at favorable rates. 

For the Week Ending June 29th. 
Machine foe Kyanizing Wood.— David 

W. Hunt, San Francisco, Oal.— 91,848, 

antedated June 22d, 1869. 

This invention is designed to provide an 
improved machine for retaining the wood 
in position, while the substances or solu- 
tion for kyanizing are forced into its pores. 
It is in fact a cheap device for forcing the 
solution into the pores of the wood. In- 
stead of placing a stick of timber in a 
boiler or expensive cylinder, Mr. Hunt 
simply places a plate upon one end of a 
stick of timber, so constructed, by having 
its edges turned up, as to make a water- 
tight joint by being pressed againstthe end 
of the timber, and at the same time leave a 
small chamber between the face of the 
plate and the end of the stick. Into this 
chamber is forced, by hydraulic pressure, 
the preserving fluid, be it oil, liquid sul- 
phates, creosote, or any other kinds of 
liquid. The pressure forces the liquid 
into and along the pores of the wood, driv- 
ing the sap before it as far as may be de- 
sired — through the entire stick and out at 
the top, or only for a short distance, as for 
the bottom of fence posts, or the ends of 
timber designed to be placed in brick 
walls, where, without some such preserv- 
ing process they soon decay, by means of 
the moisture abstracted from the bricks. 

A large number of these machines may 
be constructed at small cost, and by means 
of a small force pump may be operated in 
the field or shop, or wherever else it may 
be •convenient to affect the preservation 
process. The plate is held in place by con- 
necting rods passing through a similar 
plate fixed upon the opposite end of the 
timber. Mr. Hunt is an old and ingenious 
inventor, and one who has given much 
time to kyanizing presses, to wood pave- 
ments, etc. 
Process of Roasting Atjrtferous Sulphu- 

kets. — Wm. Bruckner, Central City, Col- 
orado Territory.— 92,009. 

This invention relates to the application 
of certain materials, in a particular man- 
ner, so as to more readily and effectively 
accomplish the roasting of gold-bearing 
sulphurets. Mr. B. is inventor of the well- 
known Bruckner's revolving furnace, ex- 
hibited at the Mechanics' Pavilion in this 
city in 1866. He is now r operating success- 
fully with his invention in Colorado. 
Submarine Foundation. — Wm. H. Foye, 

San Francisco, Cal.— 92,033. 

The object of this invention is to pro- 
vide mechanical means by which the con- 
struction of the foundation of submarine 
walls is greatly facilitated. It also relates 
to the foundation of the walls for build- 
ings and other structures erected upon 
ground and in countries subject to earth- 
quakes. In the construction, granite, con- 
crete, or any other suitable substance is 
employed — concrete being generally pre- 
ferred, especially for submarine works. As 
this invention is one of much practical 
value and interest, we propose, at an early 
day to illustrate and fully describe it. 

Steam Engine Governor. — William H. 

Howland, San Francisco, Cal. — 92,051. 

This invention consists of two or more 
light curved springs, pivoted at one end 
to a loosely moving collar, by which the 
valve stem is operated, and which are fast- 
ened at the other end to the spindle or disk 
from which they receive their rotary mo- 
tion. The weights consist of short cylin- 
ders, with conical ends, placed within the 
springs, and having their cones formed at 
such an angle that when in place they bear 
against and support each other. The 
weights are kept in place by grooves, in 
which the springs rest, so that they are 
thrown out or drawn in by the varying 
speed. 



Steam Engine Valve. — William H. How- 
land, San Francisco, Cal. — 92,052. 
This invention consists of an instrument 
which may be used as a gauge-cock for 
steam boilers, or an oil cup which may in- 
troduce a certain quantity of the lubricant, 
as may be desired. It may also be em- 
ployed as a faucet for beer or other liquids; 
a throttle- valve for steam pipes, and for all 
purposes where an ordinary stop-cock is 
employed; but with the advantage of al- 
ways remaining tight, without being 
tapered, while it is not liable to become 
fastened in its seat. It also possesses the 
still further advantage of costing much 
less in its construction than any other cock. 
Both this and the governor noticed 
above, and also invented by Mr. Howland, 
have been already referred to in our col- 
umns. 

Foe the Week Ending July 6th. 
Funnel. — Henry F. Lawrence, Vallejo, 
California. 

Improved Railway. — Sutton and Cro- 
well, San Francisco. 

Manufacture of Sugar. — Claus 

Spreckels, San Francisco. He-issue. 

Machine for Washing Dishes, Knives 

and Forks, Etc. — Charles M. Leland, 

Central City, Colorado Territory. —92,323. 



California Academy of Sciences. 



An adjourned meeting of the California 
Academy of Natural Sciences was held on 
Tuesday evening, Dr. J. G. Cooper in the 
Chair. 

Messrs. A. T. Winn and Isaac Wormser, 
Consul of Wurtemberg, were elected resi- 
dent members. 

Dr. Behr stated that in a recent invoice 
of prepared insects which he had received 
from Acapulco, was a species of Northern 
butterfly. The specimen was caught in a 
mine, back of Acapulco, at an elevation of 
2,000 feet above the sea; and he thought it 
would be a matter of interest to know how 
far the Northern species of butterfly went 
into the tropics. 

Prof. Bolander gave an interesting ac- 
count of a trip which he had taken among 
the Sierras, and a description of Emigrant 
Gap and Bear Valley, in Nevada county, 
and the country surrounding. His theory 
is that that beautiful valley was once a 
lake; large worn boulders and pebbles 
gave ample evidence of this. The ap- 
pearance of the mountains showed the 
effects of glaciers, and he had no doubt 
that the canon was produced by one of 
these immense fields of ice. 

Mr. H. P. Carlton, who accompanied 
Prof Bolander, stated that he had made a 
collection of shells from the mountains in 
the neighborhood of Cisco. 

A large collection of plants from Oregon 
were then exhibited. They had been pre- 
pared with great care, and were exceed- 
ingly beautiful. 

Dr. Henry Gibbons, Senior, then pre- 
sented a communication from J. M. Upham, 
of Bio Vista, which was read. Mr. Upham 
stated that the remains of several Indians 
had been exhumed near that place. One, 
the body of a woman, was found buried in 
a sitting posture, while the men were ly- 
ing on their sides, in a cramped up posi- 
tion, the skull of the woman had been se- 
cured by a gentleman and brought to this 
city. All of the bones were gathered np 
by the Chinamen working at the place 
where they were found and burned. Mr. 
Upham then spoke of the reclamation of 
Sherman Island. Forty-seven miles of 
levee, five feet in hight, had been built 
around the island, at a cost of $ 80,000. 
He thought if a committee from the Acad- 
emy would visit that locality they would 
be able to collect much valuable informa- 
tion. 

The members then entered into a very 
interesting discussion in regard to the tule 
lands of California, and the reclamation of 
them for agricultural purposes. 

Cholera— How to Cure it.— At the commence- 
ment of the dnirrlKE.i, winch always precedes an attack 
of the cholera, lake a teaspoonful of the Pain Killer in 
sugar and water (hot if convenient), and then bathe freely 
the somaoh and bowels wiih the Pain Killer clear. Should 
the diarrhoea or crainns continue, repeat the dose every 
fifteen or twenty minutes all the patient is relieved. In 
extreme cases two or more teaspooufiils may be given at a 
dose. The Pain Killer, as an inter ;ial remedy, has n > equal. 
In cases of Summer Complaint, Dyspepsia, Dysentery, 
Asthma, it cures in one night by taking it in'ernally, and 
bathing with it freely. Its action is like magic when ex. 
ternally applied to Bad Sores, Burns,. Scalds, and Sprains. 
For Toothache, don't fail to try it. Iu short it is a rain 
Killer. 

The Paiu Killer is sold by all Druggists and dealers in 
Family Medicines. 

BEDINGTON & CO., and HOSTETTER & SMITH, San 
Francisco, Cal., General Wholesale Agents. jylm 



Adoress Wabtsd. — We are desirous of communicating 
with Allen Oliver, lately of Jamestown, Tuolumne County, 
California. tf 



Returned.— Dr J. H. Paine. Dentist, Wadsworth House 
No. 225 Bush street, between the Occidental and Cosmopoli- 
tan Uotels, San Francisco. 21vl7--lm 



Photography.— For Cabinet Photographs, or Enameled 
Cards, of the very best quality, you must go !o the NEW 
YORK GALLERV, Nos. 25 and 27 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Every picture warranted to give satisfaction. 

itlvlS 6m B. F. Howland. 



The Golden Gate Latch. 



Invented by John "W. Still, of San Francisco, Patent 
obtained February 2d, I860, through the Mining and 
Scientific Press Patent Agency, is rapidly becoming 
the leading Latch of America, on account of its real 
■worth, as attested by all who have used it. The in- 
ventor of this splendid improvement justly claims 
superiority over all others now in use. 

1st. Durability, as he -warrants them for ten years in 
ordinary wear. 

'2d. In security, as no kind of stock can open them. 

3d. Neatness and elegance of style. 

4th. Ease of adjusting to the gate, as there is no 
mortising and only four screws required. Not one-half 
the time of adjusting the ordinary latch is required, 
and of course better for the carpenter. 

6th. Cheapness. 

6th. Convenience, as the gate can readily be opened 
from either side. 

7th. There is comparatively no resistance to the gate 
closing, in which case the rigid Latch A, supported by 
the spring B, glides across the inclined plate C, and 
hooks over the end of it securely. 

And Ave extract a portion of one of the many letters 
of commendation the inventor has received, as follows: 

" I have for some time been using your 'Golden' Gate 
Latch, both on my bain, doors and gates, and for secur- 
ity, durability and convenience, I have met with noth- 
ing to compare with it. You have properly named it as 
well on account of its golden virtue as to designate from 
whence it enumerates; and I can assure you I am 
proud to know that California has the honor of working 
out the vexed gate-latch problem." 

Mr. Still having made arrangements to have th b 
magnificent Latch manufactured East in the most dura- 
ble ^and elegant style, and in quantities suflicient to 
supply the Dnited States, will furnish them on the 
most liberal terms. All communications in reference 
to it addressed to him through the San Francisco Post 
Office will be promptly attended to. 



N. W. SFAtTI/DING, 

Saw Smithing and Repairing 

ESTABLISHMENT. 








Nor, 17 and 19 Fremont St„near Market* 

MANUFACTURER OF 

SPAULDING'S 

Patent Tooth Circular Saws. 



EACH SAW IS WARRANTED IN EVERY RESPECT. 

Particular attention paid to construction of 

Portable & Stationary Saw Mills. 

MILLS FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTI-IE, 
At the lowest Market Prices. 



Pacific Mail Steamship Co's 

STEAMSHIPS FOR 

NEW Y0EK, JAPAN AND CHINA. 

LEAYE WHARf, CORNER OF FIRST AND 

Brannan streets, at 11 o'clock A. M. of the 

following dates, for PANAMA, connecting via Panama Rail- 
road, with one of the Company's splendid steamers from 
ASPINWALL for NEW YORK. 

On the lOth, I'Jth and 30th of each month that has 
SO days. 

On the lOth, 18th. and 30 th of each month that has 
31 days. 

When the 10th, 18th and 30th fall on Sunday, they will 
leave on Saturday preceding; when ihe 17th tails en Sun- 
day , they will leave on the Monday following. 

Steamer leaving San Francisco on the 10th touches at 
Manzanillo. All touch at Acapulco. 

Departure of the 17th or 18ih is expected to connect with 
the French Trans-Atlantic Co.'s steamer for St.Nazaire, 
and English steamer for South America. Through tickets 
can be obtained. 

I'he following Steamships will be dispatched on dates aa 
given below : 

July 9-GOLDEN CITY Cnpt. Wm. F. Lapldge, 

Connecting with ALASKA, Unpt. Gray. 

Jnlv 17— MONTANA Capt E. S. Fdrnsworlh, 

Oonnectinp with HENRY CUAUNCEY.Cupt. Connor. 

July 30-co LOR ADO Capt. Wm. H. ParKer, 

Connecting with AKIZONA, Cnpt. Maury. 

Passengers berthed through. Baggage checked through. 
One hundred pounds allowed each adult. 

An experienced Surgeon on board. Medicine and attend- 
ance free. 

These steamers will positively sail at 11 o'clock. PaBEtn- 
gers are requested to have their baggage on board before IU 
o'clock. 

Through Tickets to Liverpool by the "Inman" and "Na- 
tional " Steamship Lines, can be obtained at the office of 
the P. M. S. S. Co., San Francisco, where may also ho ob- 
tained orders fur passage from Liverpool or Southampton 
to San Francisco, either via New York, or St. Thomas— if 
desired an amount of £10 to £20 will be advanced with the 
above orders, Holders of orders will be required to iden- 
tify themselves to the Agents in England. 

For Merchandise and Freight to New York and Way 
Ports, Conioany's Form of Bill Lading only used. 

No Freight will be received on hoard after 2 P. M. of the 
day prior' to the simmer's departure. 

The Steamship GREAT REPUBLIC, Capt. Cnvarly, will 
be dispatched tor YOKOHAMA and HuNGKONG on SAT- 
URDAY, July 3d, 1869, at noon connectingat YuKOHAMA 
with the steamer NEW YORK for SHANGHAI. Shippers 
of freight to China or Japan are requested to mark on each 
package its deftinaiion. 

for passage, freight and all other information, apply at 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Go's office, corner of Sacra- 
mento and LeideEdnrll" streets. 

OLIVEli JvCUBIDGE. Agest. 



July 17, 18C9.] 



Tr\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



45 



RAILROAD PROGRESS. 

The stringency of the money market has 
as yet failed to exert any unfavorable intlu- 
ence on railroad work, anywhere through- 
out the Pacific slope. Work upon unfin- 
ished roads and portions of roads, appears 
to be pushed ahead with as much energy 
as ever. We report progress on the vari- 
ous roads since our last reference, as fol- 
lows: 

The Westers Pacific. — Ono hundred 
and fifty men are at work upon the bridge 
over the Mokelumno river, which will be 
completed by the first of August, when the 
cars will commence their regular trips to 
Stockton, Quite a large number of men 
who have been at work around Stockton, 
have been transferred, the past week, to 
the Oakland eud of the road, where there 
are now between two and three thousand 
Chinamen at work. 

The Oakland Stkeet Railroad.— The 
grading upon this road is being rapidly 
pushed forward. The timber and iron is 
already on the ground, and track laying 
will soon be commenced. This project is 
not expected to be a profitable enter- 
prise at -first; but it will greatly enhanco 
the value of real estate along its line, and 
will eventually become a dividend-paying 
investment. 

The California Pacific track-layers 
have about or quite reached Knight's Land- 
iug, where a mile of tule laud will delay 
them a while for piling. The road 
will reach Marysville by the middle of 
October. 

Marysttlle to Grass Valley. — A road 
between these two points is much talked of. 
The topography of the country through 
which it would pass is very favorable. The 
cost of such a road would be quite small — 
not more, it is thought, than would be the 
cost of the much shorter route from Grass 
Valley to Colfax. 

Petalujia to Cloverdale. — Since the 
impression has gone abroad that the pro- 
jected Saucelito and Humboldt road will 
not be built, a strong independent move- 
ment has been made for connecting Clover- 
dale by rail with Petaluma, and articles of 
incorporation have been filed with a capital 
of §1,400,000 for such a work. This road, 
if built, may at any future time be used as 
one of the links for the Humboldt road, 
which must, sooner or later, be constructed. 
We are still quite confident in the belief 
that the Vallejo project will be carried 
through, and at a very early day. 

The San Quenttn and San Kaeael Rail- 
road Co. have advertised for, if not al- 
ready received, bids for the construction 
of a road between those two points. 

Railroad and 'Boat to San Jose. — A 
company has been formed, which appears 
to mean business, for the construction of a 
railroad from San Jose" via Santa Clara to 
Alviso, from which latter place a line of fast 
steamers will run to San Francisco. A 
horse railroad between Santa Clara and San 
Jose is now nearly ready to go into opera- 
tion, which may possibly form a portion of 
the line first alluded to. This road, if 
built, will owe its existence mainly to the 
exorbitant freight charges of the San Jose 
road — bad policy on the part of the latter 
company. 

Oakland and San Jose. — It is said that 
work will be commenced for the extension 
of the Alameda railroad to Warm Springs 
and San Jose, as soon as the Western Pa- 
cific is completed to Oakland. So it ap- 
pears that San Jose promises soon to be 
pretty well "connected" with San Fran- 
cisco — by the San Jose road on the west 
side of the bay ; the Alameda road on the 
east side, and the Alviso road and steam- 
boat line through the bay. 

Los Angeles and San Pedro. — The ears 
are running out ten miles from San Pedro, 
on this road. The work is being pushed 



rapidly towards its completion; 200 men, 
aud more teams have lately been added to 
the working force. The iron horse will 
soon be steaming into the city of Angels. 

MaBYSVLLLE to Oregon. — Work on this 
road is still being rapidly pushed forward. 
Wo hear nothing definite with regard to 
the project of, purchasing the Oroville 
road. 

The Virginia and Tiuvkee Road, it is 
now confidently anticipated, will be com- 
pleted by the 1st of December, perhaps two 
or three weeks sooner. The monthly pay 
roll now amounts to about §120,000. The 
road-bed is nearly ready for the track. The 
tunnels will all be completed in about six 
weeks. The completion of this road will 
be a great thing for Virginia City, and all 
concerned in the Comstock mines. 

White Pine. — Arrangements are being 
made for the construction of an incline 
tramway between Hamilton City and the 
Pogonip Heights of Treasure jHill. The 
distance is only about 1,000 feet; but a 
great saving of time and expense in the 
transportation of ores, etc., will accrue from 
this improvement. The down cars will 
draw up the empty ones by a rope passing 
over a large pulley at the top. Mr. Richard- 
son, the projector, expects to drive the 
" last spike " inside of a month. 

The Northern Pacific. — Surveying par- 
ties are out in various parts of the route, 
examining the country, and negotiations 
are at the same time pending, looking to an 
early commencement and vigorous prose- 
cution of the enterprise. Those who have 
the matter in hand appear to be very de- 
cided with regard to an early completion 
of the work. Within a few months a sur- 
vey to locate the line of the road, definitely, 
will be made, and the capitalists who have 
the enterprise in hand promise that it shall 
be commenced from the lake side at an early 
day. 

The Southern Pacific. — The new com 
pauy which has this enterprise in hand are 
still at work with the end in view of an early 
construction of the road. A spirited rail- 
road meeting was held in San Diego, last 
week, with the view of securing a large 
land donation, which may be offered as an 
inducement for the company to make that 
port its western terminus. The result of 
Gen. Fremont's visit to Europe is anxiously 
awaited. 



Brainwokk.. — Hard thinking is the most 
exhausting of all labor. After long-continued 
muscular exertion comes the blessed balsam — 
sleep, to recruit the system. But when his brain 
has been upon the stretch all day long, slumber 
often Hies from the pillow of the man of many 
anxieties, aud schemes and cares. Even if he 
sleeps he carries his daylight thoughts and per- 
plexities with him into his dreams, and repose 
does not refresh him. Let all who are troubled 
with restlessness from this or any other cause re- 
sort to Drake's Plantation Bitters for relief. 
This unequaled vegetable tonic and alterative is 
also a gentle anodyne — it soothes the over-worked 
brain, calms the agitated nerves, and soon, de- 
spite of care or grief or anxiety, " steeps the senses 
in forgetfulness." A dose taken at bedtime will 
secure a good night's rest, and another in the 
morning an appetite for breakfast and such a con- 
dition of the stomach as will promote digestion. 



Three Hundred large mahogany logs from 
Central America, at much lower rates than East- 
ern mahogany, at Hobbs, Gilmore & Co's Box 
Factory, Market street, near Beale. *** 



New Mining Advertisements. 



George "Washington. Silver Mining; Company, 

White Pine, Nevada. 

NoTiCR.— The Annual Meeting of the Stockholders ot the 
above named Company, for the election of Trustees for the 
ensuing year, will he he!d at the office of the Company, No. 
10 Stevenson Building, S. W. corner Montgomery and Cali- 
fornia slreets, on FRIDAY, the 23d day of July, 1869, at 4 
o'clock P. M.. Per order. 

THOS. J. OWENS, Secretary. 

San Francisco, July 16, 18G9. jyl7 



Thnnderlioldt Mill and Mining Company, 

White Pino, Nevada. 

NoTicii.— The Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of the 
above named Company, for the election of Trustees for the 
ensuing year, will be held at the office of the Company, No 
10 Stevenson Building, S. W. corner Montgomery and Cali- 
fornia streets, on FRIDAY, July 23d, 1369, at 4 o'clock 
1*. M. Per order. THOS. J. OWENS, Secretary. 

San Francisco, July 16, 1869. jyl7 



Mining Notices— Continued. 



Daniel WcUiler Silver Mining C'om|nuiy.- Lo- 
cation ol Wmk- While Pino District, Nnvaita. 
Not let- is hereby given, thai at a meeting of the Board o( 

Trustees ol said Company, held on the thirtieth day of 
jane, 1869, an assessment of afteen cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock ol said Company, payable 
Immediately, In United Slates g-id coin, to the secretary, 
at his oflloe. 

fVnyiiock upon which wuid assessment shall remain un- 
paid on tilt; ihinh'tli iSOth) day ul July, 1969, shall be 
.'. . mod delinquent, and will be duly advertised for Bale nt 
public suction, and unless pavim-ut shall be made before, 
mil be sold "ii Thursday, the nlnetueiiili duy of August. 1869, 
to pay i in' ,b ( 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 «._■ 1 1 x asseasnieut, together with ooats of ad 
verthung and cxpeusesof sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

O. D. SQUIRE, Secretary. 

Olllee, *18Collfornla street, San Francisco, Oul. |y1 



Eveulnv Star, No. 1, Silver Mining Company 

Location of Works: Whitu Pine district, White Pine 

County, Stale of Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-fifth day 
ul .lime, 1H69, an assessment of ten cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company; payable 
Immediately, in united States gold 'coin, to the secretary, 
at the oiliee oi the Company, No. 3U2 Montgomery street 
sun Vrancleco, Cal. 

Any stocit upon which snld assessment shall remain 
unpaid on Saturday, I lie tliirtv -tlrat dav of Julv, 1669, 
shall be deemed delinquent, mid will be duly advertised 
torsale at public auction, and unless payment shall be 
made before, will be sold on Saturday, the twenty-first day 
ol" August, lHtiy, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of advertising a:id expenses of sale. By order 
of the Board ol Trustees. 

WM. II. WATSON, Secretary. 

Office, Room No. fi, No. 302 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Gal. jc26 



North Star Gold Mining Company — Location 

of Works: Grass Valley, Nevada County, Calllornla. 

Notick.— There are delinquent upon the following described 

stock, on account of assessment levied on the fourth 
day of June, 1869, the several amounts set opposite the 
names of the respective shareholders, as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Stiares. Amount. 

Win If V Crouise, Trustee 1 1 $ 20 00 

C F Fargo 6 87 1710 011 

Thomas Hope 6 t7 1740 10 

JasH Grossman 8 1 20(0 

P (J Partridge 10 37 740 00 

WE Dean 1L 1 20 0U 

A E Hill, Trustee 16 20 400 00 

E N Torrey 25 fi loo 00 

Geo W heaver 28 - 29 580 03 

A E Hill, Trustee 29 15 auO 0't 

FUParirldge 31 1 20 00 

Samuel P Holden 35 5 1U0 00 

Samuel P Holden ,36 5 ]00 do 

Vloletta Clement S9 10 20D 00 

Benjamin Brady Ai. ]y 200 00 

Benjamin C Wright 44 5 100 00 

Thos J Poulterer 45 50 100) 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 47 15 300 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 52 10 200 Do 

A E Hill, Trustee 57 10 2ii0 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 58 10 200 Oil 

A E Hill, Trusice 59 10 200 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 64 65 1300 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 155 75 1500 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 69 10 200 00 

WL Torrey 11 5 ion on 

A E Hill, Trustee 73 5 100 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 2 40 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 82 90 I8O0 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 85 5 ion 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 86 5 mo 00 

L Kuhn, Trustee fi 100 00 

L Kuhn, Trustee 5 ma no 

A E Hill, Trustee 25 500 00 

A E Hill, Trustee i 25 500 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 101 25 500 1)0 

Thos J Poulterer 10 10 2'JO 00 

AE Hill, Trustee.. 103 15 300 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 104 5 loo 00 

A E Hill, trustee 105 5 100 00 

ET Pease 106 Id 2fi0 00 

ET Pease 107 10 200 00 

E T Pease 103 10 200 00 

ET Pease HJ9 10 200 00 

ET Pease no 10 200 "0 

ET Pease ill 10 200 00 

E T Pease \\i 15 300 00 

RT Thomas 117 50 10o0 (10 

M Bettman H8 5 kjo go 

A E Hill, Trustee 120 82 640 00 

AE Hill, Trustee. 123 5 100 00 

A E Hill, Trustee I25 10 200 00 

Wm B Allen 127 5 100 00 

McDonald & Whitney, Trus...l29 3 60 00 

E T Pease 130 15 300 00 

Charles Stevens 131 10 200 00 

Charles Stevens 132 5 100 00 

Charles Stevens 133 10 200 IX) 

John W Titconro 134 10 200 00 

Thos J Poulterer 136 50 1000 00 

John W Titcomb 133 10 200 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 139 10 200 00 

Geo W Beaver. U3 60 1000 00 

C F Fargo 144 10 iOO 00 

A H Lissak. Jr.. Trustee 146 5 100 l 

George A Raymond 147 5 lilO 00 

A H Lissak, Jr., Trustee MS 5 100 00 

A K P Hnnnnn, Trustee U9 1 20 00 

W B Bourn, Trustee lf.n 750 15000 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 153 74 1430 00 

A E HU1, Trustee 155 20 400 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 157 6 120 00 

AE Hill, TiUt-tee 158 500 lOOOO 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 159 30 600 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 160 100 200(1 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 161 10 200 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 162 130 2600 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 164 56 1120 00 

A E Hill, Trustee 165 23 460 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 166 16 320 00 

AE Hill, Trustee 167 3 60 00 

FA Hassey 168 5 100 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 

of Trustees, made on the fourth day of June, 1869, 

so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 

necessary will be sold at public auction, at the office of 
the Company, Room 10 at No 402 Montgomery street, San 

Francisco, on Friday, the thirtieth day of July, 1869, at the 

hour of 2 o'clock P. M. of said day, to pay said delin- 
quent assessment thereon, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. 

T. W. COLBURN, Secretary. 

Office, room No. 10 second floor of No. 402 Montgomery 

street, San Francisco jy]0 



George Washington Silver Mining: Company. 

White Fine District, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the first day of 
July, 1869, an assessment of ten cents per share (or SI 
per foot), was levied upon the capital stock of said Com- 
pany, pnyaable on the tenth day of July, 1869, in United 
states gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the Com- 
pany, No. 10 Stevenson Building; San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock unon which said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the tw ll'th day of August, 1869, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall he made before, will 
be sold on Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of August, 186 , 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with cost of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

THns. j. OWENS, Secretary. 

Office, Stevenson Building. San Francisco, jylO 



Engraved to Order.— Persons who desire to illustrate 

their individual establishments or business, should give us 
their orders for Engraving and Printing, and we will guar-. 
antee good work and reasonable prices. , 

DEWEY & CO., 
Patent Agents, Publishers and J oh Printers* 414 Clay st. [ 



Gold Hill Tunneling Gold and Silver Mining 

Company.— Location: Gold Hill, Storey Countv, State of 
Nevada. 

The Fifth Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of the 
above named Company, for the election of Trustees to 
serve for the ensuing year, will be held on SATURDAY, 
the seventeenth day of July, 1869, at 3>£ o'clock P. M., at 
their office, 414 California street, San Francisco. Cal. 

R. WEGENER, Secretary. 

Office, 414 Calirorniastreet, San Francisco. Jel9 

I. X. X.. Gold and Silver Mining Company.— Lo- 
cation of Mine:, Silver Mountain District, Alpine Coun- 
ty, Cal. 

NOTION— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
tenth day of May, 186'J, the several amounts set oppo- 
site the names of the respective shareholders as follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. shares. Amount. 

Bridges. Mary C 360 J2>£ $ls 15 

Bonier, BUey 55 10 15 uo 

Clark, T B 375 10 |fl no 

flark.TB 3*6 2.M 33 75 

Lontr. E M 354 10 15 00 

Phillips. Chas C 60 UK 6 65 

Vega, Pde la 154 11 16 m 

Jardln, lienrv itts 5 7 60 

Jardha, Henry 304 3 4 50 

Jardln, Hcnrv 330 12*£ 18 76 

Jardln, Henry :<31 5 7 BO 

He-pburn, James HO 6 7 50 

Hepburn, James 15S 5 7 60 

Hepburn. James 217 H) 15 00 

Bolls. John 2;,6 8 V£ 00 

Huteh, V S 312 8 12 00 

Cutter. R S 36t> 3« 6 25 

Cutter, R S 384 10 15 00 

Long, M 385 2U 7-16 33 60 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the tenth (10th) day of May, 
1869, so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may 
be necessary, will be sold at public auction, by Messrs. 
Olney & Co., auctioneers, No. 426 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, on Wednesday, the fourteeenth day of July, 
1869, at the hour of 12 o'clock, M., of said day, to pay said 
delinquent assessment thereon, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

J. CROWNINSHIELD, Secretary. 
Office, Pioneer Hall, Montgomery street, up stairs, San 
Francisco. [y6 

Postponement.— The above sale is hereby postponed until 
Monday, the twenty-sixth day of July, 1869, at the same 
hour and place. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

jyl7 J. CROWNINSHIELD. Secretary. 

San Fernando Tnnnel and Silver Mining Com- 
pany, White Pine Mining District, State of Nevada. 
Notice.— Theflrst Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of 
the San Fernando Tunnel and Silver Mining Company will 
bo held at the office of the Company, on MONDAY, the 
second day of August, 1809, at 3 o'clock P. M,, for the pur- 
pose of electing Trustees to serve for the ensuing year, and 
for the transaction of any other business that may prop- 
erly come beforo the meeting. 

GEORGE L. SMITH, Secretary. 
Office, No. 16 Stevenson Building, corner Montgomery and 
California streets. 
San Francisco. July 1, 1F69. jy3 

Sedgley Tunnel and Silver Mining Company. 

White Fine Mining District, Slate of Nevada. 

The first Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of the 
Stockholders of the Sedgley Tunnel and Silver Mining 
Company, will be held at the office of the Company, on 
MONDAY, the second day of August, IS69, at 1 o'clock P. 
M., for the purpose of electing Trustees to serve for tbe en- 
suing year, and tor the transaction of any other buslnesa 
that may properly come before the meeting. 

GEORGE L. SMITH, Secretary, 

Office, No. 16 Stevenson Building, corner of Montgomery 
and California streets. 

San Francisco, July 1,1869. jy3 

Thunderbolt Mill and Mining* Company, White 

Pine District, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the first day of July, 
1869, an assessment of five cents per share (or $1 per footji 
was levied upon the capital slock of said Company, pay- 
able on the tenfh day of July, 1869, in Unbed States gold 
coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the Company, No. 10 
Stevenson Building, San Francisco. Cal. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the twelfth day of August, 1869, shall he 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment shall be made be- 
fore, will be sold on Thursday, the twentv-sixth dav of 
August, 1869, to pay the delinquent assessinent, together 
with cons ot advertising and expenses of sale. By order 
of the Board of Trustees. 

THOS. J. OWENS. Secretary. 

Office, Stevenson Building, San Francisco, Cal. jylO 

"White Cloud Tnnnel and Silver Mining Com. 

pany, White Pine Mining Disirict, State of Nevada. 

Notjok.— The first Annual Meeting of Stockholders of 
the White Cloud Tunnel and Sil er Mining Company, will 
be hold at the office of the Company, on MONDAY, the 
second day of August, 1869, at 2 o'clock P M.. for the pur- 
pose of electing Trustees to serve for the ensuing year, and 
for the transaction of any other business that may properly 
come before the meeting. 

GEORGE L. SMITH, Secretary. 

Office, No. 16Stevenson Building, corner of Montgomery 
and California streets. 

San Francisco, Julv 1, 1869. jy3 

"Willlmatittc Silver Mining Company. Location 

of works Wliiie Pine District, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twentieth day 
of May, 1869, an assessment of twenty cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secre- 
tary, at his office, 418 California street, San Francisco. 

Any stock upon whieh said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the nineteenth day of July, 1869, shall be 
deemed delinquent, and will he duly advertised for Kale at 
public auction, and unless payment shall be made before, 
will be sold on Tuesday, the tenth day of August, 1869, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

O. D. SQUIRE, Secretary, 

Office, 413 California Street. San Francisco. je2ll 

Tfosemlte Mining Company, Humboldt County, 

Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a. meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the second day of 
July, 1869, an assessment of fifty (50) cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company, payable 
immediately, in United States gold and silver coin, to the 
Sacretary, San Francisco* 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain nn- 
paid on the seventh day ol' August, 1869, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will 
be sold on Tuesday, the twenty-fourth day of August, 
1869* to pay the, delinquent assessment, together with 
cosis of advertising aud expenses of sale. By order of the 
Board of Trustees. 

D. H, CROWE. Secretary pro tern. 

Office, No. 220 Clay street, San Francisco, jyld 



46 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 17, 18G9. 



Ocean Fertilisers. 

All along the Coastof New Jersey, it is 
well known, coral, composed largely of 
phosphatic and nitrogenous matter, is 
forming so rapidly as to threaten interrup- 
tion to navigation in some places. Being 
an excellent fertilizer, it is being collected 
with strong forks and grappling hooks; 
and in many instances the deposits are so 
large and heavy, that they cannot be lifted 
to the surface. By passing the entire mass 
through a crushing machine, everything is 
crushed to fragments. At the same time a 
liberal amount of dry muck is mingled 
with the coral for the purpose of absorbing 
the ammoniacal material, and thus retain- 
ing it until the compost can be applied to 
the soil. This new fertilizer promises to 
be a source of rich revenue to the State. 

Again, according to Humboldt, there 
exists in the Atlantic Ocean, a little to the 
West of the Azores, a space seven times 
lnrger than all Germany, completely cov- 
ered with a dense mass of marine vegeta- 
tion. M. Jules Lavinierd has proposed to 
the Societe dAgriculture to make these 
floating meadows, as they are called, sub- 
servient to the purposes of agriculture. 
His suggestion is, that the ships occupied 
during the summer in cod fishing should, 
in other seasons, be employed in conveying 
this abundant manure to the Azores^ where 
an entrepot could be established, the weeds 
pressed and dried, and the mineral salts 
they contain extracted. Analysis has shown 
that these weeds possess the same fertiliz- 
ing properties as those employed as man- 
ure on the French coasts. M. Lavinierd 
calculates that these floating meadows pro- 
duce annually sufficient vegetable matter 
to manure 1,350,000,000 acres of land. An 
extent of country equal to the entire area 
of the United States previous to the an- 
nexation of Alaska. 



Lecture-Boom Lightning — The Mon- 
ster Con,. — In our summary of Scientific 
Progress for June 5th, we gave a descrip- 
tion of the new monster induction coil at 
the London Polytechnic Institution. All 
the Year Bound, in a recent article, thus 
describes the curious effects produced by 
the twenty-nine-inch spark in the lecture 
room : " Iu the darkened theater at the 
Polytechnic, the long flash lights up the 
room and the audience with the peculiar 
lurid glare so well known as an effect of 
brilliant lightning at night, and displays 
the features and action of every one pres- 
ent. But it is curious to note that the 
flash being of instantaneous duration only, 
it allows no motion to be seen. We should 
think, if guided by our consciousness 
alone, that the flash lasted an appreciable 
time; but this would be an error, due to 
the persistence of the impression on the 
eye, after the flash had ceased. If the room 
be made perfectly dark, and if the specta- 
tors all raise their arms and wave their 
hands to and fro as quickly as they can, the 
flash will display the position of the arms, 
but not the movements of the hands. 
While ilie flash lasts, the hand has no time to 
move, and is consequently seen, as if mo- 
tionless, in the position in which the flash 
finds it. It is in contemplation to exhibit 
the same effect in a more complete way by 
affixing a picture to a revolving disk. When 
the disk revolves so rapidly that no out- 
lines of the picture can be distinguished 
by means of any ordinary light, they will 
be perfectly seen in a darkened room by 
the light of the flash. It lasts so sh irt a 
time that the revolving disk doe.* not 
change its position in the brief porioX 



Preserved Pineapple. — Select nice 
ripe apples, pare them and tear them from 
the core with a silver fork. Then weigh 
them, allowing a pound of sug'ir to a 
pound of fruit. Put the sugar and fruit 
together in a preserving kettle and let 
them simmer slowly for an hour and a 
half. This preserve will keep for a year 
or two if sealed closely and kept in a cool, 
dry closet. 

An Excellent application for a Foot 
Wounded by a Busty Nail. — Just as soon 
as possible after the foot is hurt put some 
hot ashes in half a pail of water and im- 
merse the foot therein while as hot as can 
be to be comfortable, and keep it in half 
an hour. This remedy will draw out sore- 
ness and inflammation. It has been testel 
and found effectual. 



Machinists and Foundries. 



PALMER, KNOX & CO., 

Golden State Iron Works, 

Wo.. 19, 31, «3 and 35 First Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

MANUFACTURE ALL KINDS OF 

41'EAM EHttlNES MM QTJAKTZ M.JT.1L.S 
DUNBAR'S IMPROVED 

^elf--A.dju.stinK Piston. Faclcing, 

Requires no springs or screws; is always steam tight; 
without excessive friction, and never 

gets slack or leaky. 

WHEELER & RANDALL'S 

YEW GRIMIER AS1> AMALfiAMATOK 

HEPBURN & PETERSON'S 

AMALGAHATOK AND SEPARATOR, 

J£ m. o 3: ' s Ainalffainators, 

WITH PALMER'S PATENT STEAM CHEST, 

superior for working either GOLD OR SILVER ORES, and 
a the only Amalgamator that lias stood the teat of seven 
years' continual working. 

Pennine White Iron Stump Shoes and Dies 

Having been engaged for the past ten years In quartz 
nining, and being conversant with all the improvements, 
ither in Mining or Milling, we arc prepared to furnish, at 
ineshortest notice, the most perfect machinery for reduc 
n; ores, or saving either gold or silver. liivlUqy-ti' 



IEA P. RANKIN, 



A. P. BRAYTON. A, C, AUSTIN, 



Pacific Iron Works. 



First and Fremont Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Having been established since 1851, we have accumulated 
a very large variety of Gear and other Patterns, which, 

with our superior tools and appliances, give lks facilities for 
doing first class work Unequaled on the Pacific Coast. 

Among other things, we manufacture the following: 

STEAM ENGrllVfiSS, 



BOILERS- Iliyl* and Low Pressure, 

Pump, Pipe and Sheet Iron Work of every kind. 
Quartz Mill Work, 

Including High and Low Mortars, for wet or dry crushing- 
Furnace Irons for Roasiing Ores: Freiberg Barrels; 
Varney's and Wheeler's Amalgamating Pans 
and Settlers; Stamp Sln.es and Dies of 
best White Iron; Russia Iron 
Screens, etc., etc. 
Flour Mill, Saw Mill and Sugar Mid Work in every variety; 
Pumping and Hoisting Machinery ; Uanshrow'3 
Patent Challenge Pump, fur Domestic, 
Ship and Mining use— the most 
approved and successful 
Pump manufactured. 

Casting* ef every description* Iron and Bras?. 



We would call especial attention to " Wright's Patent Va- 
riable Cut-off Engines," of whieli we are the sole manufac- 
turers on the i-'aeiilu .Coast, under license from the Wood- 
ruff & Beach Co., Hartford, Ct. As a simple, eUective, fukl 
saving, tlrst-cUss Engine, this is, without doubt, the best 
Engine made In the United States. 

Orders promptly attended to. Prices as low as possible 
for first-class work, and we intend to do no other. 

OOUDA1CD «fc CO. 

San Francisco, May 1, 1868. IBvlGtf 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY. 

No. 125 First street, opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

All KtKDSof Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt Metal 
Castings, Brass Ship Work of all kinds, Spikes, Sheathing 
Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges, ship und steamboat Bells and 
Gongs of superior tone. Ail kinds of Cocks and Valves, Hy- 
draulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and Connec- 
ions of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dispatch. 

OSr PRICES MODERATE, -ffiff 

J. P. GALLAGHER. J. H. WEED V. KING-WELL. 

9via-ly 



BENJAMIN* ELLIOT, 

No. 483 Brannan street San Francisco, 

Manufactures Foundry Facings constantly, lrom choice 
coals. Bituminous, packed in tight sacks. Anthracite and 
Charcoal ground together or separate, packed in whole 
or halt barrels Black Lead, Coke and Soapstone grouud to 
order. Foundrymen located far from choice material, can 
rely on having superior Facings forwarded to order. 
lOvlSqr 




JAMES MACKEN, 

SS0 Fremont st. ( bet. Howard <& Folsom 

All kinds of COPPER WORK done to order in the best 
manner. Particular attention paid to Steamboat, Sugar 
House and Distillery work. 

Repairing promptlyand neatly attended to. 

lBvll 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 
EUREKA :FOTJiXI>IfcY 9 

129 and 131 Beale street, between Mission and Howard, 

San Francisco. 

LIGHT AND HEATT CASTINGS, 

of every description, manufactured 24vl6qr 



CITY IRON WORKS COMPANY. 

CLERC & CO., 
IRON FOUNDERS, 

Steam Engine Builders, and Makers of all 
kinds of Machinery, 

6vll6qr No. 28 Fremont street, San Francisco. 



Miners' Foundry 

—AND— 

MA-OHINE WORKS 

Nos. 245 to 255 IFibst Street, 

Sun Francisco. 

HOWLAND, ANGELL & CO., 

I'lCOI'IUETOES, 

Manufacturers of Machinery for 



QTTAKTZ MILLS. 
SAW MILLS, 
POWBOl MILLS, 



rLOTR MILLS, 
SIOAK MILLS, 
PAPIB' MILLS 



Steam Engines of all Kinds, 
Amalgamators of all Kinds. 

MIKIKO PUMPS, HOISTING WORKS, 

OIL WELL TOOLS, BOCK BKEAKEKS, 

— iND — 

Machinery and Castings of all kinds, either 
of Iron or Brass. 

Boilers and Sheet Iron Work in all its 
Branches. 

KhneH und III l'n of White Iron, mnnnractnred 
for imd Imported by us expressly for this pur- 
pose, and will lust 35 per cent, longer than any 
other uiade on this coast. 

Knsslalron Screens, of any degree of fineness, 
We are the only manufacturers on this coast ot 
the 

HICKS ENGINE, 
The most compact, simple in construction, and 

durable, of any Engine In use. 
W. If. UOWI..1M), H.B.AXUELL, 

IJvU-Qr C1KU8 PALM EH. 



FXJLTOIV 

Foundry and Iron Works. 

HINCKLEY & CO., 

HAriOFACTnilK-rtfl Or 

8TEAM ENGINES, 
Quartz, Flour and Saw 31111s, 

Hayes' Improved Steam Pump, Brodle's Im- 
proved Crusher, Ml n In a Pumps, 
Amalgamators, and all kinds 
or Machinery. 

N. E. corner of Tehama and Fremont streets, above How, 
ard street, Sao Francisco. S-qy 



mcafee, spiers & oo, 

AND GENERAL MACHINISTS, 

Howard st, between Fremont and Bcalc, San Francisco. 

Flue or Tubular Boilers, with plain circular or spiral 
courses. Upright Flue or Tubular Boilers, Locomotive and 
and Marine Boilers, and Wrought Iron Tanks of every de- 
scription. 

Hydraulic Pipe supplied at reasonable rates. In or- 
dering, give ihe quantity of water to be supplied, hlghtof 
the fall, and total length of pipe, so as to enable the flrra to 
determine the diameter of the pipe and thicknessof iron to 
be used. 

Repairs.-- Boilers, Smoko Stacks, Pipes, etc., put in re- 
pair with promptness. 

To Boiler Mukers aad Machinists In the In- 
terior.— The firm is prepared to furnish estimates of 
Boilers, supply new Heads, drilled and punched, and Httend 
to the selection and forwarding of Iron for Boilers, Pipes 
and other purposes. 

Plans. Srawln^N and Spec! ftcatlons.— The firm 
Is prepared to make out Plans and Specifications, receive 
estimates, and superintend the Erection of any Machinery 
that may be entrusted tu their care 

To Inventors.— The firm la prepared to assist in de- 
veloping the plans of those who have (he ideas hut not the 
practical experience necessary to put the samt: in form, by 
muklng Drawings of their Inventions, giving them the ben- 
efit of their practical knowledge in the construction of Ma- 
chinery, and attending to the manufacture and introduc- 
tion of their Inventions. lvlBtf 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

Sacramento. 
WILLIAMS, ROOT & NEILSON, 

MANOFA0TOKERS OF 

8TEA.M ENGINE8,EOILER8, 

CROSS' PATENT BOILER FEF.PER AND SEDIMENT 
COLLECTOR, 

And all kind* of Mining Machinery. 

Also, Hay and Wine Presses made and repaired 
with neatness, durability and dispatch. 

Dunbar's Patent Self- Adjusting Steam Piston 

PACKING, for new and old Cylinders, manufactured 

to order. 

Front Street, between X and O streets* 

14vll Sacramento Citt 



THE RISDON 

Iron and Locomotive Works. 

Incorporated, April 30, 1868. Capital, $),t 00,000. 

Location of Works, Corner Bcale and Howard streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Successors to Pacific Mail P. S. Co. Works at Ben icia, Coffey 

& Risdon, and Devoe, Dinsmore .t Co., ban Francisco. 

Steam Engine Builders, Boiler Makers, 

MACHINISTS AND FOUNDRYMEN. 
All work in their line attended to with promptness and 
dispatch. 



S. F. Butterworth, 
Lloyd 'lY-vis, 
Jas. Pollock, 
ben. Holladay, 



Directors: 

Chas. E. McLane, 

John N. Risdon, 
Joseph Moore. 



JOHN N. RTSDON, President. 
Joseph Moore, Vice President itnd Superintendent; Chas. 
E. McLnne, Treasurer; Lewis R. Mead, Secretary; Lewis 
Coffey, Superintendent Boiler Works. 24vl7-qy 



G. T. PEACY. 
MACHINE WORKS, 

NOS. 109 and 111 MISSION STREET, 
Between Main and Spear. 

New and second-hand 

Engines and Boilers, 

FOR SALE. 

Also one first-class Hoisliug 

Engine ; one Unrlght 

Engine, ol entirely 

new pattern. 

MANUFACTURER OF 

ULatlies, I>rills, 

And MILL MACHINERY of 
every description. 

New and Improved 
STEAM ENGINE 

REGULATORS, 

The best and cheapest vet In- 
vented—manufactured and 
lor sale. Parties are In- 
vited to examine it 
in practical op- 
eration. 

F. A. HUNTINGTON'S 

^ Shingle Machines 

on hand. 

Particular attention paid to 
Repairing. 

. _ All work guaranteed to be done in a first-class man- 
ner, and at the lowest rales. 12vl7u 




HUGU H. LAMONT. 



WM. CALDWELL. 



Cyclops Engine and Machine Workf, 

Construct and Repair every description of 
Stationary and Marine Fnp:It>es, Mill and Min- 
ing Machinery. 

Special attention given to Repairing Machinery. 
ap!7-3m 113 Beale street, near Mission, S. F. 



Phoenix Iron Works. 




JONATHAN KITTEEDaE, Proprietor, 

Nos. IS and 20 Fremont street, near Market, 
San Francisco. 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Fire-Proof Doors and Shutters, 

Wrought Iron Girders, and all kinds of Houscsmith work, 

Bridge, Prison 

FORGING AND MACHINE WORK, 

IMPROVED FIRE-PROOF SAFES, 

FIBE AND BUKCrLAE-PEOOF SAFES, 

Of a superior make. manufacturer of the celebrated 

MONITOR SAFE. 
BANK VAULTS AND SAFES, 

Of every description, made to order at short notice. A 

large stock of SAFES of all kinds constantly on hand. 
Agency for the ISH AM KEY REGISTER BANK AND SAFE 
LOCK, ihe only first class Lock in Hie 
lvl7tf United States 



PACIFIC FILE WORKS, 

No. .■»:{ Beale Street, bet. Market and Mission, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Files Re-cut and warranted as good as new, with a savinc 
of fifty per cunt. REAPER AND MOWER SECTIONS 
MA.DK TO ORDER. The only establishment on ihe Coast. 
Orders from the country promptly attended to. j^- First 
Premium awarded at il»« State Fair, 1S67. 

2vl7-i.n , T. G. DPKNI.VG * OO 



GLASGOW 
Iron and Metal Importing Company 

Nos. 25 and £7 Fremont street, 

SAN FBANCISCO, 

Keep constantly on hand a large stock of best Bar and 
Bundle Iron, Holler Tubes, Plate and Sheet Iron, Gas and 
Water Pipe, Anvils, Cast Steel, Gas and Water Fittinp" 1 , 
which they oiler to the trade on llheral terms. 

21vI6-3in W. McCRINDLE, Manage. 



Removal. 



NELSON & DOBLE, 



AGENTS FOR 



Thomas Firth fe Sons' Cast Steel, Files, 



Mill Picks, Sledges, Hammers, Picks, 

Stone Cutters', Blacksmiths' and Horse-Shoers' Tools, 

Have removed lo 13 and 15 Fremont street, near 

Market, San Francisco. 

lllvUqr 



CALIFORNIA TOOL WORKS, 

Blacksmith and Machine Shop, 

143 Beale St., bet. Mission and Howard, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

All kinds of Edge or oiher Tools made 1o order. Par- 
llcular attention paid to pu ting in order AGRIUi LI URAL 
MACHINERY. Job Grinding and Polbhing by stream. 
Orders lrom ihe Country promptly attended lo, fi^-All 
wmk warranted. 

2lvl7qy J. WEICHHART, Proprietor. 



Bv Mail.— The Mhnvu ami Sritntifi>- Press will he pent by 
mail to an v pari ol the civilized world. In case of n moval 
subscriber's have only to inform us of the post o lb cruel dress 
of ihe old and new location, and Ihe paper will be '.ent 
accordingly; 



July 17, 1809.] 



Tr\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



47 



Machinery. 



VARNEY'S 

PATENT AMALGAMATOR , 

ThiNi' jlachlnm Simid Unrivaled. 

Por rapi-llv jnilveri.dn,' .ml amalgamating ores, they 
Ko effort has bMIl, or will lie, spared to 
hive litem constructed in the moal perfect mai D 
the gratl number now in opentioid not one haaavwn- 
a aired repair*. The constant end Increadag demand for 
Ihcm UauMclent evidence of ilieir mcriiv 

They »re constructed - -inn directly Into 

tie pulp, or with steam boUatlU, U desired. 

Tbii Amalgamator Operates as Followi : 

The pan being tilled, the motion of tliemullcr forceathe 

center, where It la drawn down throe 

erturc and between [hu tirimllnit surfaces. TheOCe u U 

thrown to th« periphery Into the qulckaDvor. The curved 

Lin draw it to the center, where It panel down, 

and to the elreumfereace an be tore. Thusiti« constantly 

ru a regular flow betwuoti the grinding iuj 
,u , the quicksilver, until the ore n rednoed iutu impalpa- 
ble powder, and the metal amalgamated. 

■iftlf.M nuide on the -tame principle excel all others.— 
Tiny brltiiryliu pulp so cuiistantlv and perfectly to contact 
trtth quIcUllver, that the particles are rapidly and com 
ale tell .i ;i 

Miii men ire Invited to examine these pans urn) nctlers for 
t i, in-. Ivor,, at the olHec, ZZ& Fremont Street, 

Ivl San Francisco. 



CROWS' COMBINED 

Heater & Sediment Collector 
1 



Jr 



This Healer effectually prevents the collection and depo- 
Bltlon "i B idtrocni In the bollor from impure water. From 
April 1, 1089, the R .yaltv on this Heater lias been 

ICihM II) i'» PERCENT., 

Which enables the Vulcan Iron Works, McAfee. Spiers A 
c,,, ithd>>u Iron Works, ut'Suii Fr-uieisoo. Keep & Karglon, 
ot Stockton, and Williams A Co.. of Sacramento, the parties 
having the right to build them, to furnish these Heaters ut 

greatly reduced rates. Send for Circulars to 

lCvlS-Sm 





Importaiit to every one using Steam for 
any purpose. 

CARVALHO'S 

Patent Steam Superheater 




[SECTIONAL knd view of boiler, with SUPERDKATKR 
Saveti Fuel! Saves Water! Saves Prensnre! 

Brief Rxtracls from letters from pirtlcs nsing narvalho's 
Superheater. Full letters can be seen on application: 
Navt Yard, Washington, June 15, 186D. 
"Superheater saves 12 per cent. In fuel and 10 per cent, 
more In speed of engine." 

Nm Yaud, Washington, Oct. 8, 1867 (after seeen years of 
service.) 

"Superheater yet attached to boilers, and appears to be 
In good order." 

Howard Watch and Clock Co., Boston, May 19, 1800. 
"Superheater saves us at least 10 per cent, tn fuel and 
gives a Urge increase ot power." 

■Iones A Suits, New York, March 21, 1867. 
" Superheater saves 20 per cent, of coal, less steam press- 
ure, exhaust more serviceable in dryine paper " 

Stkau Rnoinb Works, South Brooklyn, April 23, 1867. 
"Superheater saves not less than 20 per cent, fuel; no 
priming I" 

ilaiiCKKTT Leather Cloth Co., Newark, N. J., Oct 16, '67. 
'■Superheater economize* 25 per cent fuel; does our 
work with 2S lb**, less pressure steam, and steam superior 
for drying purposes." 

N. Y. Dvk ng &. Printing Estah., Oct 4, 1867. 
"Superheater brings contents of our dye vats to boiling 
point in one-third less time and one-third less Increase of 
water; saves us at least 15 per cent, fuel." 
Contiguous Oil Refining Co., Blughampton, N. Y„ Sept. 
20, I3t>7. 

" Superheaters cive entire satisfaction, and wo super- 
heat to 55' dew— ait increase of W) dog." 
Cakk.wM\nov, Cj, So. Hartley Falls, Mass, Oct. 17, '67. 
"Superheater saves 15 or 20 per cent, fuel; steam for 
paper mill now perfectly pure and dry— an Important ad- 
vantage In our business." 

Statkn Island Fancy Dyeing Estad., Juno 18, 1867. 
"Superheater saves at least 25 percent In fuel, and we 
have the advantage (hardly to be over-estimated) ol per- 
fectly dry steam." 

./Etna Ikon Works, San Francisco, Sept. 15, 1867. 
" Superheater saves 25 to 30 per cent, in fuel; no prim- 
ing " 

Contra Costa Laundry, Oakland, July, 1868 
"Superheater causes a use of 50 lbs. steam Instead of 60 
lbs,; use much less water, and there is a saving in fuel." 
Havilah M. Co., Cal., August, 1868. 
"Superheater causes a use of 40 lbs. steam instead of 00 
lbs.; use much less water, and there Is a saving of fuel." 
( 2 sets.) 

Sixth Mechanics' Inst Fair, S. F. Kept A, 1868. 
"Superheater used proves that it savea fully 30 per cent, 
in fuel." (Chief Engineer.) 

NiiVada M.ll, Virginia City, May :10, 1869. 
"Superheater is a pericct success and saves three cords 
of wood in ten, or 33,^ per cent, in fuel; engine works 
better." 

Ann many other letters of the same tenor. 
Awarded Silver Medul, Mechanics' ffu* t •( ni -. 

SltU Fr:iiH:['.Oi>, 1SCI8. 
AxviiviU-il Silver Mednl, Maryland Institute, 

Baltimore, 
Awiii'ili-il Silver Medal, American Eustltnte, 
New York, X8«.i. 
Send for Circular to jETNA IRON WORKS. San Frrn- 
C ico, California. ROB I'. L. HARRIS, Agent. 

JOHN L. CONSTABLE, Engineer. 25vl3tf 




Jjl, JL tUi 



UNITED STATES AND FOREIGN 

n 



PUBLISHERS MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



ROOT'S PATENT FORCE BLAST ROTARY BLOWER. 

MANUFACTURED BY KEEP & BARGION, 

At the Globe Iron Works, Stockton, California. 




Fifty I»ev Cent. 



LESS POWER 



Than any Blower 



Steamships. 



One of these Blowers may be seen on exhibition at W. T. Garratt's Brass Foundry, corner of 
Mission and Fremont streets. They are also in use at the Almaden Quicksilver Mine; Gridley's 
Foundry, Gold Hill, Nevada ; Mtna Iron Works, San Francisco, and many other places. 

Caution. — Purchasers will find it to their advantage to apply direct to the Stockton Agency, as 
certain parties, not authorized to manufacture the Blower, have put in the market machines of inferior 
construction, which do not answer all the requirements of the genuine article. 
Quartz, Saw and Grist Mill Irons, Steam JBngineg, Horse Powers, HigH and Low 

Pressure Steam Engines, Steamboats and Propellers, made at short notice. 



For circulars and further information, address 



KEEP & BARG-ION, 

Globe Iron "Works, Stockton. Cal. 



Rails, Newel Posts, 

AND BALUSTERS, 
Constantly on hand forsale, and 
shipped, together with 
all kinds of 
STjVirt WORK, 
To any part of the coast. Practi- 
cal ■workmen sent, when desired, 
to put up the dame. 

Work "Warranted to Fit 
by simply sending a correct ground 
plan of stairs, together wiih hight 
of story. 

Wood-Turning and Scroll Saw- 

ingof all kinds promptly executed. 

BSF- Spanish Cedar, Walnut and 

California Laurel always on hand 

for sale. 



SffifflOTWfififcX 




HUNTINGTON'S IMPROVED SHINGLE MACHINES. 




-~* SHINGLE MACHINES CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
Steam EngineSj Saw Mills, Lath and Picket Machinery, and Flax-Break3, 

aVCA-IDIE TO OBDEB. 

HUNTING-TON & BUSWELL, Manufacturers, 

Sv3l-lam3m 1? and 11* Fremont Sic cot, San Francisco. ~3 



REBELLIOUS ORES. 

THE HAGAN FURNACE. 

The above method for the purification of Rebellious Ores 
la respectfully offered to tho public. Repeated actual 
workings chow that the 

IIAGAN FURNACE 

Will accomplish all that iho Reverbcratory Process will 
do. and at an expense that is merely nominal. It has never 
failed to ireat nny ore eflVct unity. 

It has never been claimed for It that It will extract gold 
from ores which ito not contain any of that meinl. 

Partlesownlnu rich but refractory veins, cun treat with 
the undersigned upon the basis of 

(;iAKA.\Ti:r.» results, 

With responsible security. For an Interview, and all de - 
sired particulars, address 

THE PACIFIC ORE CO., 

P. O. Box 1019, San Francisco. 
June 25 1SC9. 29vl8-3m 



RANSOME'S PATENT 

Diamond Grit Grindstones, 

"Warranted of Uniform Testate, 

TWICE AS STRONG AND WILL CUT AT LEAST TEN 

TIMES AS FAST AS THE BE3T NATURAL 

STONES. 

We manufacture the following qualities, viz: 
"Hard, "for Machinist!, etc. 
"Medium," for General Use. 
"Soft,** for Woodworkers, Etc., 

Diameters, 4 10*70 inches; thickness, M inch to 12 inches; 
and any fineness required. 



Solid Emery Wheels and Sharpening Stones, 

Of all forms and materials. 
Those Stones are fast supcrseu lug the natural ones in En 
gland, tho tests made there showing them to cut about fifty 
(50) times as last as the Newcastle, and entirely free 
flaws, and bard and soft spots. 

AST Grindstones, with Frames, Iron Troughs, Shafts and 
Treadles, ready to set up In working order, for sale a 
wholesale or retail. 

PACIFIC STONE COMPANY, 

E. T. STEEN.Sup't., 
20vl8tf Cor. Turk and Larkln sts . San Francisco. 



lVotiee to Miners, 

Well-Borers and Water Companies, 

MPRAG IS NOW PREPARED TO MANUFACTDRE 
. Hydraulic and Artesian Well Pipes in the best work 
manlike manner, and at the lowest market rates. Having 
made large additions to my stock of machinery for thai 
branch of business, I am prepared to fill all orders with dis 
patch, and guarantee entire satisfaction. I also mnnufac 
lure Mississippi Stoves, of the latest Improved patterns, for 
vessels of all classes. Also, Ship Plumbing done. 

M. PR AG, 
8vl3-ly Stove Store. No. 1 Clay street, below Davis. 



HAYWARD & COLEMAN 

IMPORTERS AND REFINERS 
—or— 

Illuminating, Lubricating, 



V -A. I 1ST T OILS, 

CONSISTING OF 

KEROSENE. LAKD, SPERM, ELEPHANT, POLAR, 

TANNERS. NEATSFOUT, BOILED AND RAW 

LINSEED, CASTOR AND CHINA NUT. 



Spirits of Turpentine and Alcohol. 



Lamps and Lamp Stock ! 

An elegant and complete assortment. 

SOLE IMPORTERS OF 
Devoe's Illnminating Oil" 

PATENT CANS. 
5vl7-tf. -lit Frout street, San Francisco. 



International Hotel, 

JACKSON STREET* 

BETWEEN MONTGOMERY AND KEARNY STS,,. 

SAN FRA NCIS CO, CAL. 

THIS OLD ESTABLISHED HOUSE IS IN PERFECT 
ordor for the accommodation of guests. Persons seek- 
Ingoomfnrt and economy will And this the- best Hotel in 
the city to stop at. The Beds aw new and in good order, 
and tho Rooms well ventilated. The Table win always be 
supplied with the best in the market. 
Price* varyluE from SI fi© to S» per day for 

Hotafd and Boiiid. 

FINE BATH HOUSE ANIX BARBER SHOP ATTACHED 

HO. THE HOUSE. 



1 the boats and cara to convey passengers to tho House 
free of cifcMtas,. aad tftaiiiy part of the city for SO cents 
ulviS IF. E. WEYGAOT\ Proprietor. 



48 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 17, 1889. 



Information for Inventors and 
Patentees. 



JLN EXTRACT 

From ihe American and Foreign Patent 

Agency Circular of the Mining and 

Scientific Press, Dewey tfi Co. , 

Publishers. 

Important Advantages. 

Some of the advantages to be obtained by pat- 
ronizing us may be enumerated as follows : 

Inventors on this coast having their applica- 
tions for patents made out through our agency, 
can sign their papers at once, and thus secure 
their rights much sooner than by trusting the same 
to distant agencies, situated at New York or Wash- 
ington. 

Many inventions on this coast are for objects 
and purposes but little understood by parties at 
Washington or other parts of the JBast. Our min- 
ing machinery, processes and operations are best 
understood by those familiar with their use. A 
personal verbal explanation is oftentimes of im- 
portant service, and enables us to be more suc- 
cessful than agents generally. 

Remittances of money made by individual 
inventors to the Government sometimes miscarry, 
and it has frequently happened that applicants 
have not only lost their money, but their inven- 
tions also, from this cause and consequent delay. 
We hold ourselves responsible for all fees en- 
trusted to our agency. 

By an able and faithful representative of our 
firm in Washington, our clients' applications are 
guarded against indifferent examination, unfair 
treatment in any contingency, and hazardous de- 
lays. 

Patents for inventors on this coast are actually 
secured cheaper through our agency than any 
other, however flattering may be the induce- 
ments offered at the commencement by others. 

Extensive practice gives us great facilities, se- 
curing regularity in the transaction of our busi- 
ness, which extends to EVERY COUNTRY IN 
THE WORLD where patent laws exist. 

We assist in bringing valuable inventions to the 
general notice of the public throughout the Pacific 
Coast by illustration or description in the columns 
of the Mining and Scientific Press. 

Confidential Advice. 

Those who have made inventions and desire to 
consult with us respecting the same, are cordially 
invited to do so. We shall be happy to see them 
in person at our office, or to advise them by mail. 
In all cases they may expect from us an honest 
opinion. Eor these consultations, opinion and ad- 
vice we make no charge. A pen-and-ink sketch 
and description of the invention should be sent to- 
gether with a stamp for return postage. Write 
plain, do not use pencil or pale ink ; be brief. 

Remember all business committed to our care, 
and all consultations, are kept by us secret and 
strictly confidential. Our permanent business in- 
terests demand, as it were, a sacred compliance 
with our obligations as solicitors, and in reference 
to our strict fidelity in this respect we refer to one 
and all of the thousands of inventors and patentees 
on this coast who have patronized us. 

What Claims can be Patented ? 

A knowledge of Ancient and Modern Mechan- 
ics and familiarity with American and Foreign 
patent issues and rejections, enables ns to determ- 
ine in a measure in all cases what can be patented, 
and how much can be claimed as new and novel, 
and be covered by Letters Patent. This is one of 
the most difficult questions encountered by both 
old and new inventors — one in which an experi- 
enced counsel is of great service. 

A majority of the Patents issued during the 
past eight years to Pacific Coast inventors have 
been secured through our Agency; consequently 
we can more readily and correctly advise new 
applicants than any other agent. 

Expense of Applyingfor Patent. 

The Government fee, on filing an application 
for a patent in the United States, is fifteen dollars ; 
and if the patent is allowed, twenty dollars addi- 
tional is required. If rejected, the first fee of fif- 
teen dollars is all that is demanded. 

To the foregoing official fees must be added 
fees for preparing the various documents and ex- 
pense of drawings. Our charge for preparing the 
documents for a case, presenting it to the Govern- 
ment, and attending to all business connected 
with it, is S25 and upward. For cases demanding 
extra work and attention, only a reasonable fee in 
accordance with the services required, to do full 
justice to the case, will be charged. 

Following is the list of Government fees, pay- 
able in currency : 

On every caveat $10 

On every application for a patent, for seventeen years... 15 
On every application for a deshm, for 3 y'ra and <5 uios.... 10 

On every application for a Ucsimi, for seven \ ears 15 

On every apflicat ion for :i design, for fourteen years 30 

On issuing eaoh original patent 20 

On tiling a disclaimer 10 

On every application for a re-issue m \ so 

Ou every additional patent granted on a re-issue 30 

On every application for an extension 50 

On the grant of cverv extension 50 

On appeal, to the Exnminers-in-Uhief io 

On appeal to the Commissioner from ExnmLuers-iu-chief 20 
On every appeal to the Judges of Circuit Court, D. C..„ 25 

tt^Our Illustrated Pamphlet, from which the 
above is an extract, will be furnished free on re- 
ceipt of postage stamp. Confidential advice given, 
and every legitimate branch of Patent Soliciting 
business promptly and laithfully executed, by 

DEWEY & CO., 
Publishers Mining and Scientific Press, 414 Clay 
street, San Francisco. 



FKEMXUAt 



FOR BEST CONCENTRATOR 

AWABDED BY THE 

MECHANICS 3 INSTITUTE, 1868, 

ALSO AT THE STATE FAIR FOR 1868, 

To J. HENDY. 




A LARGE NUMBEB OF THESE 
IMPROVED CONCENTRATORS 

ARE 1ST PRACTICAL TTSE ON THE PACIFIC COAST.J 



Mb. Hendy, by diligent and practical application, lias improved his Concentrators 
until they now stand unrivalled, far in advance of any yet brought to public notice. 
By recent alterations in the patterns for these machines, they are now made 
tsi'tx'oiigfex* and more Durable tlxan Ever. 



Office of North Star Mine, Grass Valley, Nov. 12, 1868. 
Joshwa Hendy, Esq. — Dear Sir: — I take pleasure in certifying to the efficiency of the two last 
Concentrators ordered from you. We have run them steadily since July last, with but a very trifling- 
expense for repairs. The additional length of step is a decided improvement. The first six sent to 
us have run steadily for nearly nine months, and are still doing good work. * * * The concen- 
trations from the eight pans alone much more than pay our entire surface expenses. Without them 
we should lose a large proportion by any system of concentration now in use. The eight Concentra- 
tors receive the pulp from our 24 stamps, which are crushing 1,040 tons per month. Our sales of 
Sulphurets last month amounted to 70 tons, or nearly 7 per cent, of the mass crushed. The sul- 
phurets from the reconccntration, contained about 10 per cent. sand. In addition to their properties 
as concentrators, they have done us good service aB amalgamators, they having saved us the past 
month 50 ounces of hard amalgam, worth $350, which otherwise would have been lost. 

Respectfully yours, J. H. CHOSSMAN, Supt. N. S. Mine. 



HElViDY, Patentee. 

Olfice at Union Iron "Works. 



New Advertisements. 



__ Patent Binder 

A. 3V X> PILE HOLDER 

FOR THB 

MIXIXG AND SCIENTIFIC IMtESS. 

We have on hand and for sale a patent File Holder and 
Binder of" the right size for copies of the Mining and Sci- 
entific Press, with the tille of the paper stamped on the 
same, which we offer for sale to any party for tfie low 
price of $1 50— postage free to regular subscribers of our 
p.iper It is strong :ind simple, provided wiih elastic hold- 
ers, and stiff board sides covered with cloth. At the close 
ot the volume, by cutting and fastening two cords, the sub- 
scriber has a ready bound hook, and tlie holdoi can again 
be used for the next volume— and so on. 

DEWEY & CO., 

3vl9 lam Publishers and Patent Agents. 



TVoodworth. 



IPlaners, 




PLANEK8 AKB HI A.TCUJBKS, 

With patent expansion feed gears, and other improvements, 
made at Worcester, Mass., in the most finished and substan- 
tial manner; also every description of Smith's and Woods', 
and 

Richardson, Mkbiam: & Co's Celebrated 

wKg Machinery. 

W. O.M Berry &. Co. 114 California St Snn Francisco. 

Embracing Mortising, Saw and Moulding, Slat and Door 
Tenoning, Boring. Shaping, scroll Sawing, Planing, Rod 
and Oowtll making and Re-sawing Machines, Wood and 
Engine Lathes, etc., for sale at Eastern prices, at the Ala- 
chmevy Depot of 

W. O. M. BERRT&CO, 
114 California st . San Francisco. 
B3p- Agents for Blake's Patent Steam Pump, (warranted 
ihe best in tbe market); Davis A; Purser's Woolen Machin- 
ery, ete. Being ihe selling agents for most first class East- 
ern builders, millmen and others in want ot" Machinery 
can tave money by giving u* a call. Illustrated Catalogues 
sent iree. Address TP. O. M. BERRY & CO., 114 Califor- 
nia street, San Francisco. 3vl9tf 



^ DR. N. T. WHITCOMB, 
JDejxtist, 

Xo. &05 Third street, up slaSrs, Sim Francisco 

Teeth filled with fine gold, ar'ificial bone, and platina. 

All Plate Work made and repaired ui' the bust material, 
at the shortest notice, and warranted. 

None cheaper and belter on this coast— call and examine 
specimens. 

North Beach and South Park ears pass Hie door 

Svl9 3m n.T. WHITOGMB. 



FOE, INVENTORS AND MECHANICS. 



A Complete and Valuable List, containing over 

500 Mechanical Movements. 

Now in Press, and soon to be Issued, by 

DEWEY «fc CO., Patent Agents, 

414 Clay Street, below San.ome, 

SAN FRAKCISCO. 



Important to Assayers, 

Crucibles. 

Tie Patent Plumbago Crucible Co., 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

Melting Pots, Portable Furnaces, 

CRUCIBLES, and other fire-standing Goads, 
Battersea Works, London. 
THE MORGAN PATENT CRUCIBLES have Uniform 
quality, never crack, withstand the greatest heat without 
danger; heats more rapidly than any other; change of tem- 
perature has no effect on ihcm; stand ou the average forty 
to fifty pourings. 

CERTIFICATES: 

United Stages Branch Mint. San Francisco, Cat., Starch 
12, 1869— Messrs A. S. Hallidie & Co , Agents Morgan Cruci- 
ble:— I have carefullv tested the Morgan Patent Plumbago 
Crucibles purchased from you for the U. S B Mint, and 
cheerfully certify to their superioritv and economy over all 
other Crucibles used by and under me. They arc fully 
what you represent them, and I shall continue to u<e them 
in preference to any other. J w.ECKFELDT, 

Melter and Refiner, U S. B. Mint. 

Eagle Brass Foundrv. 2vtj Fmn >nt street, San Frnncisco 
12th March, ist59— Messrs. a. S Uallidie & Co.. 519 Front 
street— Gentlemen:— We have u*cd and tested the Morgan 
Patent Plumbago Crucible, tor which vou are atrents. and 
pronounce them superior to and cheaper than anv Crucible 
used by us heretofore. GREENBEKG & MOURE. 

Messrs. A. S. Hallidie & Co :— We have thoroughly and 
severely tested in overv way the Morgan Patent Plumbago 
Crucible obtained by us from you. and rind them superior 
to any Me have yet tried, although we have used every Dot 
obtainable in this market, we have none equal to the 
above, and concede your claims for them. We think they 
will average 45 pourings of brass. 

GALLAGHER, WEED & CO,. 
California Brass Works, 125 Front street. Pan Francisco. 

Assav Office of H. Harris, Silver Citv. Nevada, April 24, 
1869-Messrs A. S Ha iidie & Co.— Gents. :-I received from 
yon three Crucibles of the Morgan make, which I have 
used since their arrival, and tested bv constant u-;e. Since 
1847, when in the New Orleans Mint. 1 have ahvavs pre- 
ferred the Crucible of D,xo»'s makr over Adus, Gauiier, 
and Taunton, Miss. Yours I find to be not alone of more 
finished make, hut to sta.ud double or treble the work of 
Dixon's Crucibles. The No. 12— the smallest sent— has 
stood sn far 3J meltings, and is as good and sound as when 
received. Your Crucibles do not scale off like others; arfd 
as they are forty per cent, cheaper, I <\o not sre why they 
shouM not be preferred by all assn> ers on account of dura- 
biliiy and cheapness. Yours respectfully, 11. HARRIS. 

On hand and for sale by the Agents, 

A. S. UALLIDIE A CO., 

13vlS-9p 519 Front street, San Francisco 



W. T. GARRA.TT, 
City 

BBASS AND BELL FOUNDER 



Cor. Mission and Fremont fits*. 

SAM FRANCISCO. 

Manufacturer of Brass, Zinc, and Anti-Friction or 
Babbet Metal Castings; 

CSURCH AND STEAMBOAT 

TAVERN AND HAND BELLS AND GONGS, 

FIRE ENGINES, F0KCE AND LIFT FUMPB, 

Steam, Liquor, Soda Oil, Water and Flange Cocks, atd 

Valves of all descriptions, made and repaired. Hose anu 

all other Joints, Spelter, Sulder, and Copper Rivets, Ac, 

Gauge Cocks, Cylinder Cocks, Oil Globes, Steam Whistles, 

MTDKAUL1C PI^JES AND JVOZZELS 
For Mining purposes, Iron Steam Pipe furnished with Fit- 
tings, &c. Coupling Joints of alleiees. Particular attention 
paid to Distillery Work. Manufacturer of "Garratt'a Pal- 
tent Improved Journal Metal," 



Sheffield Scientific School 

Of Tale College, New Haven, Conn. 

This department of Yale College, Instituted in 1840, and 
endowed with the National Land Grant in 1866, furnishes 
advanced instruction in the various branches of Mathe- 
matical, Physical, and Natural Science. 

The School Is under the direction of the President of the 
College, a Board of thirteen Professors in different special 
ties, and six assistant instructors. 

Regular courses of study, leading to the degree of Each - 
elor ot Philosophy, conferred by Yale College, arc ar - 
ranged as follows: 1— Chemistry and Mineralogy. 2— Civil 
Engineering 3— Mechanical Engineering. 4— Mining 
Engineering and Metallurgy. 5— agkiculturk. 6 — Nat- 
ural History and Geology, and 7— Sklecc Course. 

Advanced students are also admitted to optional courses, 
and if already College graduates, are received as caudi- 

atesforthe degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition, $125 per year of forty weeks. 

The Libraries, Museums, Laboratories and Apparatus, 
accessible to students, are varied and extensive. 

For copies of the Annual Circular and neport, letters 
may be addressed to the "Secretary of the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School," New Haven, Conn. Ibv6-lyl6p 



MAGAZINES. 



Harpers 

Atlantic 

Godey 

New York Ledger 

Blackwood 

Hours at Home 

Good Words 

Peterson's 

Arthur 

Lady's Friend 

Harper's Weekly., 
Chimney Corner... 
Litqrary Album... 
London Society.... 
All tbe Year Round 
London 111. News.. 



W. E, L00MIS, 
News Dealer 

AND STATIONER, 

Southeast corner Sansome and 

Washington streets, 

SUFFLIKS ALL 

EASTESI 
PEBIO DICALS 

ty the Year, Month or Number 



PACIFIC 

Rolling Mill Company, 

SAN FHANCISCO, CAL. 
Established for the Manufacture of 

RAILROAD AND OTHER IRON 

— AND — 

Every Variety of" Shafting 

Embracing ALL SIZES of 

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and Frames 

IJAJMT-lVrEIlED ITS GIST 

Of every description and size. 

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COMPANY Post Office, San Francisco, Cal., will receive 
prompt attention. 

OS) 1 - The highest price paid for Scrap Iron 9vl43m9p 




JOHN G. HODGE & CO., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers In 

STATIONERY, 

Blank Books, SchoolBooks, 

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A Journal of Useful Arts, Science, Mining, Farming, and Mechanical Progress. 



BX DSWBS J<£ 00, 

l»:it«-nl NolU-IIors. 



San "Francisco, Saturday, July 24, 1869. 



VOLUME XIX. 
Aumbpr 4. 



Table of Contents. 



Seville's Improved Bldo- 
liiii Plow— 111ns 19 

Have we Bolved the Proh- 
[omol Flying.— Ulna.. 57! 

Capital in Mining 56 

Increase of Temperature in 

Depth 00 

English Patent haws 60 

Oatohlng Whales by Klee-i 

Iri.itv 65 

aiming Items In Brief... 01 
The sut-' University . . (?) 
Resourceaanu li.velop'ts fill 
Oal. Acad, of Bciences... 60 

Now Books . 67 : 

Pater Funk 55 

Decidedly French? 65 

Patents and Inventions.. 63 

To Correspondents 57 

Si'IKM'lue 1' I:"., n k.ik .— 

BxperbnenBi upon Sound- 
ing Flames; Qeolngy of 
Texas; Explosion of Mo-' 

teoxites, etc 51 



UxOHAVIOAX PBOOBMS.— 

For Foundrymen; Oorro. 

Bkm o/ Boilers; Pulver- 
ized Ooa] as Fuel ; Test* 

o( Tiirhines, etc 51 

F.vMii.ien BOTEHOB— HOW to 

Road a <ias Hebe; Tea- 
Why Old People Crave it : 
Floor, Hood and Bad ; 

Usee "( Harrow, etc. . 50 

F.vilmino and Gardening. — 
Tile Harvest ; Look out 
for Inseets ; The Flower 
Garden : Wheat Insects in 
California, etc 6-1 

Minino BmorAST. — Califor- 
nia. Arizona, Colorado, 
Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, 
New Mexico, Wyoming 
and Montana 51 

Stock REvrew. — Stock Cir- 
cular; Shareholders' Di- 
reetory; Murkets. etc. . 5:1 

New Incorporations CO 



France Becoming Moke Self-sustain- 
ing. — France, at the present time, appears 
to be in an unusual healthy state — finan- 
cially. Her imports during the first quar- 
ter of the present year have materially de- 
creased, while there has at the same time 
been a decided inorease in her exports — an 
evidence that she is making unusual exer- 
tions to sustain herself independent of her 
neighbors, and other foreign nations. The 
importance of such a policy becomes es- 
pecially apparent in view of the present 
political crisis, and uncertainty of the Eu- 
ropean status. 

In the item of precious metals alone, her 
gain of imports over exports during Janu- 
ary and February last, was not less than 
§6,800,000. Gold is the metal more gener- 
ally retained; silver flowing out more 
freely. °A favorable harvest, preventing the 
necessity for a large importation of bread- 
stuffs, and a continuance of peace, added to 
other advantages, will give an immense in- 
crease to the national wealth of France, 
during the present year. 

"Our Chicago Friends " appear to be 
having a good time generally. After being 
dined and wined ad libitum, in the city, and 
having seen all the great sights of the 
metropolis, they have gone to view the 
wonders of Yoseinite and measure the 
" Big Trees." Some of our principal mine 
owners are making arrangements, on their 
return, to take them out and show them 
how we dig gold from our placers and 
pound out silver from the rocks. Our 
fruits and flowers have astonished them, 
while they have looked with amazement 
upon our broad wheat fields, waving with 
crops which are yielding forty, sixty, and 
even ninety bushels to the acre. It is well 
that the material wealth of our State should 
thus be seen and understood by our visit- 
ors. A new and increased enthusiasm will 
thereby be awakened in our behalf, and a 
more just and enlightened appreciation of 
the advantages which California presents 
for industrious laborers, will thus be dis- 
seminated among friends at the East. 



California Wheat at the East. — Cal- 
ifornia wheat is becoming more and more 
appreciated by Eastern millers, who now 
find it almost indispensable to mix with 
Eastern wheat in making their high grales 
of flour. 



Scoville's Improved Side-Hill Plow. 

Any improvement in machinory for till- 
ing the soil and putting it in a fit condition 
to yield to the husbandman an increased 
quantity and quality of the necessaries of 
life, is important and profitable. This is 
especially the case where the invention ac- 
complishes a certain kind of work with 
greater ease and more economically than 
other machines of the same class. A great 
portion of our State is of an uneven or 
hilly character, and these hills are covered 
with a very rich and productive soil. To 
cultivate them, a different arrangement and 
construction of the machinery from that 



I, which rests on and is firmly secured to 
the heel of the land-side, D, and the eud 
of the plow-beam at K. This arrangement 
gives to the plowman a much surer and 
easier control over the plow than when the 
handles are secured in the usual manner. 
The rod, G, is operated by the arm or lever, 
F, so as to lock the plow to be used in 
its proper position in the standard, by en- 
tering a slot in the toe of the land-side, D. 
When it is desirable to use a single plow 
(as on level ground), either of the mold- 
boards may be quickly removed by loosen- 
ing the nut, m, and removing the rod, E, 
thus converting it into a single plow. The 
mold-boards are hung upon two angularly- 



given to the public. A patent for this 
plow was obtained about two months since 
through the Patent Agency of this office. 



The Moon's Influence. — Mr. Coffin, in 
his late book, " Our New Way Bound the 
World," while writing of India, says : 
" The moon is at the full, pouring its rays 
from the zenith straight down upon us, 
with a power which is almost as unbeara- 
ble as that of the sun at midday. There 
is no heat in its rays, but they have great 
effect upon the brain. The blood rushes 
to the head, and there is a sense of fullness 
and pressure which, although not attended 
by aoute pain.is exceedingly unpleasant. 




used on the level or prairie lands, is neces- 
sary. The illustration herewith given rep- 
resents an improved construction of side- 
hill or right and left-hand plows, invented 
by Messrs. Ives and Hiram H. Scoville, of 
Oakland. 

The advantages claimed for this plow 
over others employed for similar work, 
consist, first, in its being so constructed 
that the plow which is not in use is thrown 
up in such a manner as to rest its weight 
upon the beam, as shown in the engraving, 
where the plow, A, is firmly held by the 
hooks upon the end of the iron arm, F. 
The weight of the upturned plow is thus 
made to aid in keeping the opposite plow 
to its work in the ground, while the bal- 
ance of weight is so equally divided as not 
to give an excess on one side. Its position 
is also such that it does not in any way in- 
terfere with the plowing, and the person 
who holds the plow can see to handle it as 
readily as though the mold-board was not 
resting upon the beam. 

Second. — The handles of the plow, iu^ 
stead of reaching their ground support 
separately, are brought together and at, 
tachedjto the opposite, sides of a metal bar, 



SCOVILLE'S IMPROVED SIDE-HILL PLOW. 

placed axles, one of which, belonging to 
the plow not in use, is shown at E, with its 
mode of attachment to the axis. The plow 
may also be used double, as for ditching, 
etc. , by slipping a cap over the point of 
both plows when in proper position. 

It is claimed that this is fully twenty per 
cent, easier of draft than most plows, by 
reason of the advantages already enumer- 
ated, added to the great acuteness of sheer. 
Its weight is 105 pounds; cost, $35. A 
manufactory for this plow has been estab- 
lished at Oakland Point, where it may be 
seen and any further information obtained. 
They may also be seen at Dorhmau & 
Wolf's, corner of Clay and Drumm streets, 
San Francisco. 

This plow has been successfully intro- 
duced,, the following parties among others 
already .having them in use: J. J. Beed, 
Marin county; 'A. F. Scott, Centerville; 
Geo. W. Shade, Watsonville ; Jas. McCor- 
raick, Pescadero, and J. Wood, J. B. Gil- 
christ and J. B. Jones, of Spanishtown, 
San Mateo county. The inventors are in- 
genious and practical men, as has been 
evinced by several other important and use- 
ful inventions which they havo already 



We find it necessary to keep our umbrellas 
spread at midnight as well as at midday. 
It is dangerous to sleep in the moonlight 
in the tropics." Mr. Coffin fortifies his 
presumption of the supposed influence of the 
moon by the following quotation from the 
Psalmist: — "The sun shall not smite them 
by day, nor the moon by night." 

Balloon Frames. — A " balloon frame " 
is one which has few or no mortises. The 
studs are sawed off square, placed upon 
the sills, and several nails "toed in," to 
hold the stud in place, instead of holding 
it by mortise and tenon. The upper ends 
of the studs are seoured to the plate in the 
same manner. This mode of building is 
very generally adopted in California, by 
reason of its comparative cheapness. A 
great saving is thus made, and when prop- 
erly done, a house is nearly or quite as 
strong as when put up in the more expen- 
sive manner, by mortise and tenon. 



Parker's Breech-loader, noticed in the 
last number of the Press, may be seen at 
the Meriden Britannia Go's show-rooms, on 
the northeast oorner of Sansome and Pii e 
streets, 



50 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 24, 1869. 



Familiar Science. 



Tea— Why Old People Crave It. 

The solid material or tissue of the body 
is constantly being worn out and wasted by 
labor. That which is thus worn out passes 
off mainly through the lungs and kidneys. 
The food introduced into the stomach sup- 
plies the material which, by digestion and 
assimilation, renews this waste. 

Tea and coffee, and several other plants 
as well, contain a minute proportion from 
two to three per cent, of a peculiar sub- 
stance known as theine. This substance, 
when taken into the stomach, has the re- 
markable effect of sensibly diminishing the 
quantity of this waste of bodily tissue. In 
middle-aged people, if this waste be thus 
diminished, less food will be required to 
sustain bodily vigor; hence it stands in the 
place of food — to a certain extent saves 
food. 

With the old and infirm, however, it 
serves another purpose. With them the 
stomach is unable to digest a sufficient quan- 
tity of food to make good this waste. The 
consequence is a falling away of bodily 
proportions. Old people, no matter how 
corpulent they may have been in their 
younger days, are generally thin and spare 
from this cause. It is at this juncture that 
tea comes in as a medicine to arrest the nat- 
ural and increasing waste of tissue; but 
not as a food to replace it. Hence tea is an 
especial favorite with the aged and infirm, 
whose powers of digestion have become so 
weakened that their bodily substance and 
stature are beginning to fail. 

Effects of an Overdose of Theine. 

Whatever may be said of the other prop- 
erties of tea or coffee, the theine which 
they contain is perfectly innocent of harm 
when taken into the system in small quan- 
ties — as from one or two ordinary cups of 
tea or coffee. Three or four grains, which 
may be extracted from half an ounce of 
tea, may be swallowed by an adult without 
any unpleasant effects. Old teas contain 
more than those which are new. The Chi- 
nese, without understanding the philoso- 
phy, but fully distinguishing the effects 
between old tea and new, never drink tea 
until it is a year old. The unpleasant ef- 
fects of an overdose of theine are, a quiet 
pulse, stronger heart-beat, general trem- 
bling, an excited imagination, which may 
even reach to a seeing of visions, and a pe- 
culiar state of intoxication, followed by 
deep sleep, during which all these symp- 
toms pass off. 

How to Obtain Theine — Its Composition. 

Place some dry and finely-powdered tea 
leaves in a watch glass and cover the same 
with a conical cap of white paper ; then 
place the glass on a hot iron. After a 
while a white vapor will be observed to 
rise, which will condense in minute color- 
less crystals on the inner surface of the 
paper cover. These are crystals of theine. 
When obtained from coffee they are almost 
identical in composition, and are known as 
caffeine. Another way is to evaporate to 
dryness a strong decoction of tea or coffee, 
and treat the dry powder so obtained in the 
same manner as the powdered tea. Green 
teas generally contain the largest amount 
of his substance, which is colorless, with- 
out smell and of a slightly bitter taste. Its 
composition is as follows : 

Carbon 49.80 

Hydrogen 5.08 

Nitrogen 28.83 

Oxygen 16.29 

Total 100.00 

The chief peculiarity of its composition 
consists in the large amount of nitrogen 
which it contains — a proportion contained 
in but very few other known organisms. 

Boy's Steel Test. — The boyish test of 
good steel or good tempered steel blades, 
made by breathing on the polished surface, 
and noting the time of the evporatiou, has 
lately been claimed by a prominent En- 
glish mechanic to be founded on correct 
principles. 



How to Read a Gas Metre. 

It is the privilege of every gas con- 
sumer to know, for himself, just how much 
gas he is consuming, and a few minutes 
practice will enable any one to " read the 
metre" readily; while such knowledge, be- 
sides affording a wonderful degree of satis- 
faction to the possessor, often brings about a 
much better feeling between the consumer 
and seller of gas. The N. Y. Gas Light 
Journal, furnishes the following plain and 
simple directions for acquiring such 
knowledge: The metres in ordinary use 
have three indices. The hand on tho first 
or right hand index moves to the right as 
the figures read, and each index begins at 
a cypher (0) at the top and reads, 1 to 2 to 
3 and so on to the cypher again, which is 
10. When the hand on the right index 
has moved to 1 it indicates that 100 cubic 
feet of gas have been used or passed the 
metre; when it points to 5 it means 500 
feet, and after completing the circuit at (0) 
it is 1000 feet. Each of the indices are ten 
fold mulipliers of the one preceding. Sin- 
gle figures are used for want of room, but 
the multiplier is generally placed above the 
index; thus the right hand is "one thou- 
sand," the next to the left or middle index 
is ' ' ten thousand, " and the last or left 
hand index is "one hundred thousand." 
Therefore on the first or right hand index, 
1 on the dial stands for 100; in the middle 
index 1 stands for 1000; and one on the 
right hand index stands for 10,000 and so 
in this ratio with the succeeding figures 
respectively. 

To read the metre, begin with the left 
index and write down the figure last passed 
by the pointer; then write down the fig- 
ures last passed on the second index, and 
proceed in like manner with the third or 
right hand index. Now add two cyphers 
(00) and it will give the amount of gas reg- 
istered in cubio feet. Suppose the first 
index was 2, the second index 5, and the 
third index 6, making 256, now add two cy- 
phers and you will have 25,600, being the 
amount of gas used at that time. 

At the end of the month (or at any other 
time) read the metre a'jam and the figures 
will read — say 26,500 after adding the cy- 
phers; now deduct the first sum from the 
last and you will have the difference 900, 
which indicates the number of feet used 
since the previous reading. 

Flour— Good and Bad. 

To grind wheat into flour with the great- 
est advantage, the millstone should make 
about sixty revolutions a minute; if run 
faster, the stones heat and thereby injure 
the flour; if slower, the flour adheres to 
the bran, so that it cannot be properly sep- 
arated in the process of bolting. 

Flour, when kept too long in an ordinary 
atmosphere, loses an undue portion of its 
moisture, and acquires a disagreeable taste. 
When such flour is made into dough it ab- 
sorbs a larger amount of water than is con- 
sistent with the production of good bread, 
although it looks whiter and smoother. 
Bakers often use old flour for the reason 
that the bread looks betterand weighs more 
to a given amount of flour, from the fact 
that it absorbs and retains through the 
process of baking, more water than new 
flour. 

Experiments have shown that 3% lbs. 
of flour, kept one year in a dry place, ab- 
sorbs two pounds of water in being con- 
verted into dough, and lose ten ounces in 
the process of baking. This result, how- 
ever, varies with flour of different qual- 
ities. 

Flour that has been damaged by being 
heated in grinding, does not mix thor- 
oughly with water in being converted into 
dough. To remedy this trouble bakers 
sometimes dissolve a small quantity of alum 
in the water. 

When chalk, lime, bone-ash, etc., has 
been mixed with flour, as these things 
sometimes are, the adulteration may be de- 
tected by carefully burning the flour in a 
crucible. The flour will disappear, while 
any calcareous or silicious mixture will 
remain. 

Carbolic Acid, it is stated, can be de- 
odorized. Two parts by weight of gum 
camphor are mixed with one part of crys- 
tallized carbolic acid. After this compound 
has been well rubbed together, it is mixed 
with whiting, and in that form is said to 
be a valuable disinfectant and a good pro- 
tection to furs in summer. 



Uses op Marrow. — The French Acad- 
emy of Sciences has received an interesting 
communication from Dr. Neuman, on the 
physiological action of marrow in the ani- 
mal economy. In his opinion this sub- 
stance contained in bones plays an import- 
ant part in the production of blood, and 
red cellules are constantly being formed in 
it. He remarks that when the elements of 
the red marrow of bones are examined in 
the human frame and in that of the rabbit, 
one always finds red blood cells, each con- 
taining a nucleus, clearly distinguishable, 
by their yellowish hue, from other cells 
resembling corpuscles of lymph. Some of 
the former have a simple nucleus; others 
contain one divided in several parts; and in 
some the nucleus seems to have disappeared 
altogether. Dr. N. thinks that the cells of 
marrow resembling those of lymph are an 
element from which new red blood cells 
are being constantly formed, in order to 
replace the elements of the blood which 
are being constantly destroyed, either by 
physiological or by pathological action. 



Increase of Temperature in Depth. 

The increasing ratio of the temperature 
of mines as they descend was investigated 
a second time by Mr. B. W. Fox. His 
observations will be found condensed in 
the appended table. Amongst other curi- 
ous incidents contained in Mr. Fox's re- 
port, may be mentioned the following: The 
Levant copper and tin mine, near the sea, is 
255 fathoms deep, and nearly 230 fathoms 
below the sea level, under which it is hori- 
zontally extended in slate rock. The tem- 
perature near the end of this level was 
found to bo 847° on one side and 85.5° on 
the other; the drainage water 85.5° and 
the air 85°. In 1853, the temperature of 
the rock in this level when it was not ex- 
tended so far westward under the sea, was 
reported to have been 87°, and the granite 
rock at the same level eastward of the 
shaft, 74°. The engine house of the Botal- 
lock copper and tin mine is built on a rock 
washed by the sea. The western levels of 
this mine are extended more than half a 
mile under the Atlantic. At a level 180 
fathoms under the sea level, the rock near 
the end of the level was 79° on one side 
and 79.5° on the other, the air being 81°. 



1 1) O H 5F 9? gp O Hd b ► 

g. g. a ZXZ S-S g £ 

r g g :?3 v 5 g ""o 8 

o5: gr. sr. a-. 5 H & - 
Y P'- : : : jOs tf'-r 



»->CT>C5cncncncncotOi-i-a 
(-»CGCO-qcoCOCOCChP-tOCi 

tststotsoooocococo 



OO QO 00 00 

en en en co 
CO <I-3-3 



-3 co 



CO OOOOOO GC 
Ol [>5 CO CO W 
CO tO -J -5 -J 



I I 



I I I 

cn en c 

o o c 



I I 



' ■ - ■ - " e B 5 3 e e s 



: S-S.P B I,, 

| CD CD B O CD l 






S3 



8-3 



Humboldt estimated 100 feet vertical to 
1° of temperature, above ground. 



The Southern Batlroad. — Nearly all 
the Southern Kailroads borrowed money at 
the North before the war, and the obliga- 
tions therefore were confiscated and col- 
lected by the Confederacy. Since the res- 
toration of peace, the northern creditors 
have called for their dues, and the roads 
are holden for them. That's what's the 
matter with the Southern Bailroads, and 
the reason why their stock is so nearly 
worthless. 



The English Patent Laws. 

The English journals are full of discus- 
sions upon the above named subject. A 
resolution was recently debated in the 
House of Commons, which proposed to 
abolished the patent laws entirely. It met 
with so much opposition that it was subse- 
quently withdrawn; but although many 
members objected to the extreme course 
proposed, the majority were in favor of an 
entire remodeling of the patent system. 
No wonder. It is time. The system is a 
disgrace to a civilized nation. An English 
patent is a perfect marvel of long-winded and 
elaborate vagueness. No specific "claim" 
being required, as with ns, the "specifica- 
tion" does duty, in its place; and the con- 
sequence is, that the maker of said specifi- 
cation lays himself out to cover all the 
ground within his reach. He revels in cir- 
cumlocution; he allows the diarrhoea of 
words to flow unchecked; he leaves his 
reader, or whomsoever it may concern, in 
the desired state of confused doubt at the 
end, as to what he really does claim as his 
invention; and he provides a hundred in- 
genious chances for future litigation,— of 
any one of which he can avail himself, in 
case it should hereafter appear to be worth 
his while. 

There seems to be a wish, on the part of 
the thinking ones, to adopt the American 
patent system. They are fully aware of the 
abuses current and possible under their 
own, and it is probable that the present 
agitation of the subject will result in such 
adoption, so far as is consistent with En- 
glish pride. The two principal journals 
among those especially interested in patent 
matters, The Engineer and Engineering, 
take a sensible view of the subject. The 
first says: 
' ' An examination of the arguments brought 
forward in the debate of last Friday shows 
that all the objections to patents fall under 
two main heads — the careless and ignorant 
way in which they are granted, and the 
careless and ignorant way in which patent 
cases are judged in our courts of law. It 
is complained elsewhere than in the House 
of Commons that patents are granted for 
frivolous and insufficient inventions, or for 
no inventions at all; that notoriously old 
things are continually being repatented; 
that the descriptions are insufficient, and 
that the laxity of the law favors fishing and 
fighting patents; that the descriptions and 
drawings are insufficient and inaccurate. 
All these objections are perfectly true, but 
they apply not to the principle, but to the 
administration of the law. Let there be a 
preliminary examination, as in America, 
with respect to at least novelty ; let not 
merely drawings, but also models, be re- 
quired from the patentee; let additional 
facilities be given for ascertaining the nov- 
elty, or the amount of novelty, in a pat- 
ent; let each patentee again, as in America, 
be required strictly to define his claims; 
let every patent agent be subjected to ex- 
amination and be liable to disbarring, in- 
stead of, as now, allowing ignorant boys or 
swindlers to practice. There are people 
now practicing in London and elsewhere as 
patent agents who do not even know the 
English language; who scarcely know a 
pump bolt from a cow's tail, and who 
have not the slightest idea of the laws, 
whether of patents, of mechanics, or of 
common honesty. " 

Engineering says: " In nearly all cases 
there is really nothing but a necessarily 
meagre " provisional specification," to ex- 
amine a document unaccompanied by 
drawings, and from which even an expert 
could hardly be expected to form more 
than a rough general notion of what the 
invention really was. Once in a great 
while a patentee deposits a complete speci- 
fication at the start, but even this is but 
seldom examined with any other purpose 
than the possible detection of clerical er- 
rors. It is upon a wretched and unexam- 
ined provisional specification that the in- 
ventor receives the Great Seal, and all the 
privileges of a patent; after which he files 
his complete specification, which may con- 
tain almost anything he likes, so long as it 
can be made to tally, generally, with the 
terms of the provisional specification. 
Thus, men who deliberately patent contriv- 
ances of no value for the purpose of trip- 
ping up others, have every possible encour- 
agement." 



July 24, 1869.] 



T1c\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



51 



Mechanical ^Progress. 



For Foundrymen. 

Mr. J. Anderson, C. E., Supt. of ma- 
chinery to the War Department, recently 
lectured before the Loudon Society of 
Arts, upon " Applied Mechanics." In the 
coarse of the lectnre, he took occasion to 
speak in high terms of the American foun- 
drymen. He said that they studied crys- 
tallization, the molecular structure of met- 
als, and other subjects bearing upon their 
art. The direction of crystallization in cast 
iron, when cooling, " is determined by the 
lines into space which the heat takes;" and 
consequently if we introduce into castings 
irregularity of figure, or anything which 
creates currents outwards in various di- 
rections, we introduce lines of weakness. 
The rate at which the heat is hastened out 
of the casting, must also be regarded. 
Whero great hardness is required, rapid 
cooling is necessary; but whero ductility 
is wanted, as in a gun, the heat is allowed 
to go out slowly. The American cast-iron 
guns stand well, for both tho points above 
referred to are regarded in the casting. 
Every part of a casting should cool, too, 
at the same rate. The parts which from 
their loss substance, would cool first, must 
be kept hot by covering with fire or some 
other means. The Americans are more 
careful, too, than the English, in regard to 
the allowing gas to form within the mold. 
Mr. Babbit uses old firebricks, which have 
long been in use, for his molds. Those 
which are at all discolored are rejected ; 
the others are ground up, and mixed with 
pipe-clay to secure adhesiveness. When 
used, the mold is heated red hot, and in 
that state receives the molten metal. Not 
a particle of gas is generated. 



Corrosion of Boilers. 

An article upon this subject by Norman 
Wheeler in Van Nbslrand's Magazine, takes 
the ground that the corrosion of boilers 
worked in connection with surface con- 
densers, — generally attributed to galvanic 
action induced by the condenser, — is due 
rather to the chemiccl changes that take 
place, and is consequently the cause, in- 
stead of the effect, of whatever galvanic 
action is noticeable. As a proof of his po- 
sition, he instances the following case, 
which occurred in his practice in 1864 : 

" Four vessels were built for the Gov- 
ernment, with return flue boilers and 
"high pressure " engines, bnt the steam 
was condensed, for the sake of fresh feed 
water, in open surface condensers; the 
steam spaces in the condensers communi- 
cating with the atmosphere through pipes. 
The condenser tubes were made of iron 
and galvanized, for the purpose of avoid- 
ing the corrosion of the boilers. The feed- 
water was drawn by the feed-pumps di- 
rectly from the condensers. As a matter 
of convenience, the atmospheric pipes 
were led from the condensers and opened 
into the smoke pipes, so that when an ex- 
haust took place, the vapor was for an in- 
stant driven out through the atmospherio 
pipe, and because of the continuous con- 
densation, the gases in the smoke pipe were 
drawn back toward or into the condenser 
between the successive exhausts, thus keep- 
ing up a pulsation and swaying back and 
forth of vapor and gases in the atmospheric 
pipes, which, although made of copper, 
were eaten into holes in a few days. The 
pipes passed overhead through the fire 
rooms, and the continual dripping of hot 
■water made those places very uncomforta- 
ble. The corrosion of the boilers was 
marked and unmistakable within a month. 

The atmospheric pipes were then changed 
and led to the open air, and the corro- 
sion of both boilers and pipes apparently 
ceased. 

It is supposed that carbonic acid was ab- 
sorbed rapidly by the vapor and condensed 
water in the atmospheric pipes, the supply 
being derived from the gases of combus- 
tion, and the acidulated water passed into 
the boilers by the i'eed-punips. 

Now, if it be proren that the water, 
while exposed in the hot well of an ordi- 
nary engine, absorbs oxygen and separates 
it from the nitrogen of the air, and that the 
nascent carbon of the oils, used to lubri- 



cate tho internal parts of the engine, is 
seized by the oxygen when the oils are de- 
composed by tho heat of the steam, we 
shall be able to account for an amount of 
aarbooio acid in the boilers working in con- 
nection with common surface condensers, 
sufficient to destroy them rapidly." 

Pulverized Coal as Fuel. — Mr. Thos. 
R. Crampton has been experimenting upon 
a l'urniu'e which shall secure, as nearly as 
possible, complete and instantaneous com- 
bustion of fuel. At present, from one-half 
to three-fourths of the coal burned is 
wasted. The coal is reduced to powder by 
means of ordinary mill-stones, after having 
first passed through a crusher. A blast of 
air passes between the mill-stones, keeping 
them oool, and carrying away the fine dust 
as fast as produced. A kind of injoctor, 
formed of a conical pipe or nozzle, receives 
the powdered dust as it is fed from a hop- 
per. Within the first nozzle is a smaller 
one through which a blast of air is forced. 
Instead of introducing tho mixed air and 
coal dust direetly into the chamber, where 
the heat is to be utilized, it is forced 
through a long chamber with baffling 
screens, to give time for tho combustion to 
become complete before the hot gases, thus 
produced, are brought to the point where 
the heat is required. 

Fao-simtijE Telegraphing. — Meyer's ap- 
paratus for telegraphing, employed in the 
French service, does not give merely a 
copy of the message sent, but a facsimile; 
so that telegraphic dispatches present, 
as regards exactitude and authenticity, all 
the guaranties found in postal communica- 
tions. The Abbe Caselli's facsimile of 
messages, reproduced by chemical pro- 
cesses, presented serious imperfections, 
which often rendered the deciphering of 
the message difficult, giving rise to doubts 
as to the authenticity of the writing. M. 
Meyer has avoided these difficulties by 
mechanical means. 



Tests of Turbines. — A scientific test of 
wheels of this kind is now going on at 
Lowell, Mass. A number of scientifio men 
are present, and many wheel builders from 
different sections of the country. Hiram 
F. Mills, C. E., of Boston, superintends 
the experiments, in preparation for which 
several thousand dollars was expended. 
The different wheels are tested in reference 
to velocity of discharge, number of revo- 
lutions, temperature of the water, varia- 
tions of head and resistance, — and every- 
thing carefully noted. 

Pulleys Covered with Leather. — Van 
Nostrand translates from Polyl Centralblati 
an article on this subject. The objections 
to the various methods which have been 
tried for preventing the slipping of bands 
upon pulleys, are recounted; and the cov- 
ering of the pulley with leather declared 
to be free from all of them. The leather 
is fixed by a kind of cement which adheres 
firmly to both iron and leather. 



Scientific Progress. 



Belt for a given horse-power. — F. W. 
Bacon gives this rule for proportioning the 
belt to drive a given horse-power: "Mul- 
tiply the horse-power required to be trans- 
mitted through the belt by 36,000. Divide 
the product by the number of feet, or 
parts of a foot the belt is to run per min- 
ute; divide the quotient by the number of 
feet or parts of a foot in length of that 
part of the belt in contact with the smaller 
pulley; divide the last quotient by 6, and 
the result will be the width of the belt in 
inches." 



Imperial G-reen. — This new pigment, of 
French invention, is the sesquioxide of 
chromium. It is brilliant, cheap, and not 
poisonous. The inventor starts with a 
solution of any salt of chromium, which 
he boils with appropriate reagents to ob- 
tain the green modification ; to this he adds 
either gelatinous alumina or recently pre- 
cipitated hydrated oxide, carbonate or sul- 
phide of zinc, in just sufficient quantity to 
saturate the acid. The reaction takes place 
quickly, but may be accelerated by heat. 
The precipitate has only to be washed and 
dried, and is ready for use. 



Experiments upon Sounding Flames. 

A. Weinhold, of Chemnitz, recommends 
a vory simple contrivance, to obtain flames 
of great sensitiveness to tones or noise, with 
ease and certainty. A pressure of at least 
an inch and two-tenths of water is neces- 
sary to the production of a sensitive flame, 
and as this cannot always be had, a gasom- 
eter can be contrived out of a bell jar sus- 
pended by a cord running over a pulley 
with a scale pan attached to the end for 
weights, with which to regulate the press- 
ure. The bell jar can be dipped into a 
large vessel, and filled with gas by syphon. 
A three gallon jar will furnish sufficient 
gas for more than a minute, and can eas- 
ily be replenished. Weinhold recom- 
mends certain precautions: 

"The flow of gas must be through capa- 
cious tubes so that the pressure can not be 
diminished near the burner. A half-inch 
tube is, necessary if the pressure does not 
exceed one and a quarter inches. The in- 
dia-rubber tubes must also be capacious. 
The gas where it flows out must not make 
the least noise. Such an effect is some- 
times produced by the roughness in the 
sides of old tubes or imperfection in the 
stop oocks. The burner must be a simple 
hole with a wide opening, a sharp angle 
and smooth sides. Glass tubes drawn out 
to five-hundredths of an inch in diameter 
serve a good purpose. A cylindrical piece 
of soap-stone serves better than glass, as it 
is not liable to crack. The best results are 
obtained with a burner the inner diameter 
of which at the point of ignition is 0.08 of 
an inch, and in a length of one inch 
widens to two-tenths of an inch. Such a 
burner consumes 19 cubic feet of gas per 
hour, and gives the flame 19 to 23inches 
in length. At every noise the flame' short- 
ens and divides itself into two distinctly 
separable parts — the lower, cylindrical, 
quiet — the upper, wide, illuminating and 
rustling. 

By uttering hissing consonants, the flame 
is shortened one-half: OO in deep tones 
has no effect; A and Ae act powerfully. 
The rustling of tearing of a piece of paper, 
the striking together of two pieces of glass, 
the ring of a bundle of keys, the ticking of 
a watch, all produce a marked drawing to- 
gether of the flame. A shrill whistle 
causes the flame to assume a swallow-tail 
shape." 

Geology of Texas. 

The London Geological Society has just 
republished, in English, Herr Roessler's 
sketch of the geology of Texas. We con- 
dense as follows: Texas offers a complete 
series of deposits from Palaaozoic Potsdam 
Sandstone up to the highest Tertiaries. 
A bed of bituminous coal is known to exist 
near Fort Belknap. The Carboniferous 
formation has been stated to extend over 
5,000 square miles of surface, and to be 350 
feet in thickness. The thickness of the 
Cretaceous deposits probably exceeds 1,500 
feet; they are distinctly stratified, generally 
fossiliferous, coralline limestones, particu- 
larly well developed in the Comanche sum- 
mit, 650 feet above the level of the Bio 
Brazos, where they appear under the 
form of white hippurite limestones, over- 
lying a bed of gray limestones, whose 
strata extend about 70 yards westward and 
form a low slope; they are filled to the 
depth of 30 feet with organic remains. 
The Tertiaries consist of sandstones and 
limestones. Bemains of Zeuglodon cetoides 
have been found in the hill-range of the 
Bio Colorado, and bones of Mastodon gi- 
ganteus and Elephas primigenius on the Rio 
Brazos. The calcareous sandstones and 
dolomitic limestones in the western region, 
are rich in silica, and furnish marbles of 
superior quality. 

The Azoic rocks include extensive beds 
of magnetic iron ore. Enormous masses 
are spread over the surface about John- 
son's creek; a hill, rising 45 feet above the 
level of the river Llano, is one solid mass 
of iron ore; its depth is unknown. The 
ores, analogous to those of the Iron Mount- 
ain of Missouri, are partly magnetic, partly 
specular oxide of iron; they contain on an 
average 96.890 per cent of per- and protox- 
ide of iron, with 2.818 per cent of insoluble 
siliceous substances, and give 74.93 per 
cent of metallic iron. This iron region is 
surrounded by ridges of granite, inter- 
sected by veins of quartz. Wood abounds 
in the environs. 

Superficial indications of the existence 
of great quantities of petroleum below the 
surface are not unfrequent in the environs 
of the "Four Lakes" (Harding county). 



This locality belongs to the Miocene 
period, forming a zone 50-75 miles in 
breadth and extending several hundred 
miles iu length along the coast. 

Rationale of Double Refraction. — 
Prof. Tyndall, in a recent lecture at the 
Royal Institution, reported in The Engi- 
neer, said that in air, water, and well-an- 
nealed glass, the luminiforous ether has the 
same elasticity in all directions. There is 
nothing in the molecular grouping of these 
substances to interfere with the perfect ho- 
mogeneity of the ether. But when water 
crystallizes to ice, the case is different; here 
the molecules are constrained by their 
proper forces to arrange themselves in a 
certain determinate manner. They are, for 
example, closer together in some directions 
than in others. This arrangement of the 
molecules carries along with it an arrange- 
ment of the surrounding ether, which, 
causes it to possess different degrees of 
elasticity in different directions. In a plate 
of ice, for example, the elasticity of the 
ether in a direction perpendicular to the 
surface of freezing is different from its 
elasticity in a direction parallel to the same 
surface. This difference is displayed in a 
peculiarly striking manner by Iceland spar, 
which is crystallized carbonate of lime; and 
in consequence of the existence of these 
two different elasticities, a wave of light 
passing through the spar is divided into two ; 
the one rapid, corresponding to the greater 
elasticity, and the other slow, correspond- 
ing to the lesser elasticity. Where the ve- 
locity is greatest, the refraction is least; 
and where the velocity is least the refrac- 
tion i3 greatest. Hence in Iceland spar, as 
we have two moving waves with different 
velocities, we have double refraction. 
This is also true of the greater number of 
crystalline bodies. If the grouping of the 
molecules be not in all directions alike, the 
ether will not be in all directions equally 
elastic, and double refraction will infallibly 
result. When a beam of light passes 
through ice perpendicular to the surface of 
freezing, or through Iceland spar parallel 
to the crystallographic axis, there is no 
double refraction. 



The Inflaming Point of Vapors. — 
Mr. Hutton, of Glasgow, has recently 
made experiments to determine the degree 
of heat at which the vapors of various ex- 
plosives take fire from a burning candle at 
a given distance. The Oas-Lighl Journal 
prints a table showing the result in regard 
to a number of substances, and adds in 
comment: -'The crude naphtha of the 
specific gravity of nearly 0.89, contained 
considerable portions of tarry substance 
and naphthaline, but it nevertheless took 
fire at a lower degree of heat than refined 
naphtha, the specific weight of which did 
not exceed 0. 86. That a liquid which con- 
tains but a small amount of a very volatile 
fluid may be dangerous, is seen, for in- 
stance in the experiment with the light oil 
from coal tar. This oil inflames from the 
light of a candle at 119° Fah. when ap- 
proached within a distance of one and a 
half inches. When compared with the 
great inflammability of bisulphide of car- 
bon or benzole, the tar oil may be consid- 
ered as of little danger, but it is just as 
dangerous when it is taken into considera- 
tion that the great inflammability of bisul- 
phide of carbon is well known, while the 
tar oil is looked upon as being compara- 
tively harmless. In the preceding case, 
the liquid portion, which generated in- 
flammable gases at 119° Fah., did not 
amount to two per cent, of the whole, and 
after their separation, vapors were not 
given off below 179.5° Fah." 

Explosion of Meteorites. — The Journal 
of the Franklin Institute translates the fol- 
lowing from Les Mondes: 

" M. Swaim proposed before the Acad- 
emy of Sciences the following explanation 
of the detonating explosion of meteorites. 
It has been proved that usually the aero- 
lites which reach the sphere of the earth's 
attraction, contain a large proportion of 
hydrogen. Is it not then probable that in 
their passage through the atmosphere, they 
also absorb a large amount of oxygen or 
air, so that the mixture of the two gase3 
beoomes explosive, and in fact explodes 
when the temperature either from resist- 
ance or the friction of the air becomes of 
sufficient intensity ?" 

Cold Produced by a Galvanic Couple. 
M. Favre has communicated a paper to the 
French Academy, in which he points out 
the fact that certain galvanic couples, in- 
stead of giving out heat, actually absorb it, 
and thus produce cold. Such a couple is 
one composed of platinum and cadmium, 
the exciting liquid being hydrofluoric acid. 



52 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 24, 1869. 



Anting and j§ari4imt|j. 



The Flower Garden. 

Numerous bouquets of California flow- 
ers have "been sent to the East since the 
opening of railroad communication. Of 
course such bouquets must be composed 
of rosebuds and such other flowers as do 
not perish readily. A common way of 
sending them is to gather and pack them in 
a box with cotton, which has been saturated 
with water. Press them down a little, but 
not too tightly, and perforate the box with 
seyeral small holes, so that there may be a 
little circulation of air. Bouquets so sent 
East arrive in about as good a condition as 
when taken from the bushes. Bosebuds so 
arriving, if gathered into a bouquet and 
placed in water, will soon open with beau- 
tiful full-blown roses, as perfect as if they 
had been left on the bush. So we have 
been told. 

The Germans, in fader-land, we have 
seen it stated, have a method of keeping 
rosebuds fresh into winter, which consists 
in first covering the end of the stem, as 
soon as cut from the bush, with borax, and 
then placing each bud in a paper cap or 
cone, so that the leaves do not touch the 
paper. The cap is then coated with glue, 
to exclude air and dust, and when dry it is 
carefully placed in a standing position in a 
cool place, but secure from hard frost. 

"When wanted for use, the bud is taken 
out of the envelope, the waxed end cut off, 
and the stem placed in water, when the 
rose will soon appear in full bloom. 
Watering Plants in Summer. 

It is not wise, says an exchange, to begin 
to water plants unless it is intended to fol- 
low it up thoroughly. If plants are watered 
but sparsely, they throw out their little 
roots near the surface in order to drink in 
the moisture; and if afterwards the water- 
ing be neglected, these little fibrous roots 
perish for lack of moisture and the plant 
suffers. When they are not watered at all, 
the little roots go down deeper in search 
of moisture; and in well cultivated soil, in 
good condition, they will usually find 
enough to keep them from suffering, un- 
less the drouth continues unusually long. 
If it seem necessary to give water, it should 
be copiously and in quantity sufficient to 
go down to the bottom of the roots; a 
sprinkling that wets the surface is worse 
tnan none. Syringing the leaves to wash 
off the dust, if done in the evening after the 
sun is down, will improve the appearance 
and health of plants. 

Water for this purpose, however, should 
never be used directly from a well or water 
pipes. It should be first pumped up or 
drawn off into a barreljor other reservoir. 
Water much colder tthaji the atmosphere 
exerts a chilling influence upon plants, 
which is highly injurious. On the other 
hand, water that is warmer than the atmos- 
phere has a most wonderful effect over that 
which is oolder, in exciting the growth and 
vigor of plants. It is astonishing to ob- 
serve how very hot water may be advan- 
tageously used for sprinkling upon plants, 

Look out for the Inseots. 

We have elsewhere, in the present issue, 
cautioned our farmers to look out for the 
insects injurious to wheat. The weeds, too, 
must be more carefully watched, from this 
time out, than they have been heretofore. 
We have already, in previous numbers, 
alluded to this matter, naming the weeds 
which are threatening damage by their pes- 
tiferous character or multiplication. All 
these things come as the result of cultiva- 
tion. Like the birds and house vermin, 
they always follow close upon the heels of 
civilization, and they need our constant 
and watchful care lest they get the Jadvant- 
age of us. A correspondent of the Santa 
Cruz Times enumerates some of these field 
pests which have not been before alluded 
to iu the columns of the Alining and Scien- 
tific Press. We eopy as follows : 

J notice in a late number of your paper 
a paragraph headed ''.'. Those Thistles." ' If 



you mean a large coarse thistle with smooth 
and shining leaves, spotted green and 
white, and with pink flowers, we have it 
here also, and you do well to call the atten- 
tion of everybody to the great necessity of 
eradicating it as soon as possible. It is 
from the south of Europe, and no one can 
tell how it got here. It was first noticed by 
botanists in this country at Knight's Perry, 
in the interior of this State. Its botanical 
name is Silyhum Marianum. It has no 
American name that I know of, except the 
" Spotted Thistle." It is a great nuisance. 

Another plant, quite as noxious, is the 
Maltese thistle, Cenlaurea Militesusis, from 
island of Malta. This is short, thorny all 
over, very stiff, and with small yellow or 
pink colored flowers. It grows among the 
grain crops, and is very hard to cut, bind 
or thresh. It was first introduced at Mon- 
terey, I believe from a Prench ship, and 
is spreading rapidly over the country. 

A third is worse, if possible, than either of 
the others mentioned. It is the thorny clot- 
burr, Xanthium Spinosum; a stout spread- 
ing plant, with many short thorns, and the 
burs are seed pods covered with hooked 
prickles, worse for sheep and their wool, 
than the common clot-burr; besides being 
a large, bushy plant that takes up a great 
deal of ground. 

Another introduced weed, that is very 
abundant iu the Pajaro bottom lands, but 
which is, perhaps, not so much of a pest 
as some of the others, is a sort of wild rad- 
ish. Maphanus raphanistram, with large 
pods. 

It would be of vast benefit to the State 
if these could all be exterminated ; but in a 
new and thinly settled country like ours, it 
would now be almost impossible to prevent 
them from growing and spreading. 

Only Forty Bushels. — According to 
the Castroville Argus, the sandy hills in 
that region, where the land is rented for 
only one dollar an acre, are yielding a full 
average of twenty bushels of wheat — equal 
to the highest average of any State east of 
the Kocky Mountains. The Argus man met 
a friend, a few days ago, whose farm was 
located in the richer bottom lands of that 
region, and who was growling because his 
wheat was turning out only forty bushels to 
the acre ! This incident reveals the habit 
which the farmers in our rich bottomlands 
have got into of thinking very poorly of a 
crop which don't turn out 50, 60, or 70 
bushels to the acre. Anything under fifty 
is a poor yield with them. What would 
the wheat growers on the best lands of the 
" Great West " think of such yields ? 

The Habvest. — The grain speculators 
have been unable to make a "failure " out 
of the wheat crop. The smut and rus 
wouldn't stay ; and the beaten-down grain 
would get up in spite of all that the sub- 
sidized press could say about it. There 
never has been such a crop as is now being 
harvested; and the greatest trouble now 
about the crop is to get men enough to 
gather it in, and transportation sufficient 
to take it to a market. It is thought by 
some that the increase will be fully twenty- 
five per cent, over any previous crop. 
Those figures are probably too high. It 
will, at any rate, be sufficient to gladden 
the hearts of all concerned ; and we trust 
its proceeds will result in well-filled pock- 
ets for the growers. A coteniporary very 
properly urges that more care should be 
taken by harvesters in cleaning and sack- 
ing their grain ; for unless this is attended 
to more properly than heretofore, many 
farmers will find their grain neglected by 
shippers on account of its foul condition. 

Wheat Quotations for the Week. 

New York telegrams of Monday quoted 
California wheat at $1.65@1.73. Yester- 
day it had advanced to $1.70@1.77. 

Liverpool wheat quotations on Tuesday 
were 10s. 6d. ; Wednesday, 10s. 4d. On 
Thursday they had advanced one penny, 
and agaiu another penny on Priday — stand- 
ing, as on Tuesday, at 10s. 6d. 

Hongkong dates of June 19th quote Cal- 
ifornia wheat at 2.40 per picul. 

Salinas Valley.— It is said by men who 
have traveled extensively through the State, 
that the crops in the Salinas Valley excel 
any portion of the State. 



Wheat Insects in California. 

Very little damage has hitherto been suf- 
fered on this coast, from the ravages of any 
of the various insects which interfere with 
the production of wheat. But unless the 
utmost precautions are employed, such in- 
sects will come, and their advent will be 
attended with great loss to the farmer. It 
would appear from the following, which we 
clip from the Pajaronian, that one of the 
most distructive of the wheat insects has 
already made its appearance in the neigh- 
borhood of Watsonville, Santa Cruz 
County. That paper of the 15th instant 
says : 

Mr. Knapp, of this place, brought into 
town yesterday, a bunch of wheat which 
partly solves the problem of the light wheat 
crop of this year. Iu the joint of many of 
the stalks were curious little worms, which 
some call the " Hessian Fly," and is the 
same insect that some years ago greatly in- 
jured the wheat crop in Pennsylvania and 
the Eastern States. Farmers with whom 
we have conversed seem to be doubtful 
about there being rust enough to injure 
the grain, and many have said that the rea- 
son of the partial blight was incomprehen- 
sible to them. Probably if farmers will 
examine closely the stalks of wheat they 
can find the problem solved by the pres- 
ence of this strange insect. 

An Insect at the Boot. — A gentleman 
of Alameda County informs the editor of 
the Castroville Argtts that " the wheat fields 
where the crop is light, are infested by a 
small insect that attacks the roots of the 
plant, cutting them off. He was led by no- 
ticing the seeming absence of cause where 
heads were light to pull up the stalks and 
examine the roots, which he found to be 
cut off, and eaten by the little destroyers, 
who were present in great numbers. The 
effect of this destruction of roots is the ab- 
sence of kernels in two of the six rows of 
the heads, and a blanching of head and 
stalk, so that the infested fields present a 
spotted appearance, the healthy grain being 
of a golden' color with heavy drooping head, 
the other of a pale whitish hue, with the 
heads erect. The ravages of the insect is 
confined to no particular locality, but is ap- 
parent in patches amidst the finest crops. 

The only difference seems to be between 
the fields plowed early and those plowed 
late, the former being almost entirely free 
of them; another argument in favor of 
small farms, that can be properly culti- 
vated. " 

The closing paragraph, quoted above, 
contains a most significant hint, which it 
would be well for farmers, everywhere, to 
consider most carefully. Good cultivation 
is the great preventive of almost all the 
troubles and pests that meet the farmer in 
the field. We cannot have healthy plants, 
with imperfect culture; and it is seldom 
that healthy plants are attacked either by 
insects or fungi. We doubt if smut or 
rust ever attacked a perfectly healthy field 
of wheat. The Hessian fly seeks out a dis- 
eased stalk in which to deposit its eggs, 
from which come the "curious little 
worms," mentioned by the above corres- 
pondent of the Pajaronian. The " late 
plowed land " is that wherein the plant 
roots are attacked in Alameda County. 
When a wheat field is plowed and sown 
late, in this country, there is not, as a gen- 
eral thing, sufficient moisture present to 
properly germinate the seed. The heat 
will find an easy access to the seed, and as 
easy escape from it. The consequence is, 
if the seed germinates at all, it sends up a 
weak and feeble stalk, which never can pro- 
duce a healthy kernel; and which holds 
out a oonstant and standing invitation for 
the attacks of the yavionsfungi and insects 
to whose assaults it may be subject. 

We propose, at an early day, to give an 
illustrated description of the difference be- 
tween the proper and improper planting of 
wheat. 

The wheat harvest is in progress, and the 
yield thus far exceeds the general anticipa- 
tion of grain growers. Chinamen are be- 
ing extensively employed in the harvest 
fields. There appears to be no espeoial ob- 
jection to their employment in that pursuit, 
as without them it would be almost or 
quite impossible to save the crops. 



Agricultural Items in Brief. 

Old Hay. — A farmer at West Dover, 
Vt., has been feeding out hay that has been 
in his barn for thirty -four years. It came 
out bright and sound, the cattle ate it well, 
and it was as good in every respect as hay 
grown last summer. 

BrvEES Palling. — The Sacramento, 
Feather, San Joaquin, and Tuolumne riv- 
ers are rapidly falling, and farmers will 
do well to hurry up their grain and send it 
to' market quickly. 

Peas. — There are over 2,000 varieties of 
peas, but only seventy or eighty that are 
considered truly valuable. 

Figs in Ohio. — A gentleman of Chilli- 
cothe, Ohio, has successfully cultivated figs 
in his garden for several years. He says 
that wherever the tomato can be grown, the 
fig will flourish and mature. 

How to Inoeease the Corn Crop. — A 
Western writer says if as much attention 
was paid to improving corn as is given to 
grapes, 100,000,000 bushels might be added 
to the annual crop. 

The Bice Ceop in the Southern States 
will exceed that of any season since the 
year 1860. 

Cotton Seed. — Over 4,000 tons of cot- 
ton seed have been consumed the past sea- 
son in Cincinnati, in the manufacture of 
oil. 

Cruelty to Animals. — The most inhu- 
man cruelty is habitually practiced in the 
transportation of animals by railroad. 
Fifty-four animals were lately found by the 
meat inspector, dead in an air-tight car, at 
the Morris and Essex depot, in Newark, 
N. J. 

Poisonous Clover. — Many cattle in 
Iowa have been killed by eating too freely 
of clover, which has become poisonous 
by growing too rank since the recent heavy 
rains. 

California Wool Product. — It is es- 
timated that the wool production of Cali- 
fornia, this year, will amount to about 
eighteen million pounds — 9,000 tons. 



Better than Gold Mining:. — Ivy Bro's 
crop of barley, near Salinas City, has 
turned out sixty-three bushels to the acre. 
Mr. Withers, in the same neighborhood, 
has obtained an average of eighty-two 
bushels. Five hundred acres, farmed by 
Mr. Whitesides, have averaged over eighty 
bushels, and the adjoining land farmed by 
Mr. Pomeroy, yielded about the same. The 
above are all upland crops, on the Suseol 
and Alisal ranches, and have all been 
threshed out. The lowlands, where the 
crops are later, have not yet come in; but 
the yield expected from them is 115 bush- 
els to the acre We glean the above from 
the Castroville Argus; and they are facts 
which must astonish our Eastern readers. 



Shipping Grain in Bdlk. — An indis- 
pensable condition to the'complete success 
of the Vallejo elevator, will be the possi- 
bility of successfully shipping grain in 
bulk around Cape Horn. It is understood 
that this experiment will be thoroughly 
tested the present season. Every dollar 
saved in this manner will go to enrich the 
State; hence the result of this experiment 
will be looked for with much interest. 



Variety in Farming. — One of the con- 
sequences of the completion of the Pa- 
cific Bailroad, will be the opening up of 
an immense demand for general agricultu- 
ral produce throughout all the country be- 
low the Sierras and Boeky mountains. 
This new demand will tend to the intro- 
duction of a greater variety in the farming 
of California. Anything that will turn 
the attention of our farmers from wheat, 
and divide the risks of this industry, will 
be of great value to the State. 



The Foot Hills. — Extensive experi- 
ments during the past few years have dem- 
onstrated that a large portion of the really 
very valuable land in the State is to be 
found in the greatly neglected foot hills. 
The choice of the Japan Tea Company, the 
great success which has attended various 
mountain vinyards, and several other like 
experiments, is fast changing public opin- 
ion in this regard. 



July 24, 1869.] 



TI\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



53 



Stock 2leview. 



Weekly Stock Circular. 

By AiioeiiUd Brokers of the 8. F. Stock tadExchinge Botrd 

BAH PftAjfOUOO, July 21, 1809. 
Financial, 
In lh'' midst 'if an active di-muml for money, caused 
iiv Hi 1 prosecution of improvements on an extanaim 
scale, the requirement for funds to move the crops, the 
emutructlan of new railroad facilities, and the large 
amount of unliquidated claims against Interior dealfin, 
the market is devoid of any tightness and works quito 
smoothly, oonatderinfl the stringency prevailing for 
newly three months. Eaten, in bank, aro \%V*i % and 
DQtalde, \ M%% peroeut. par month. Bullion is scarce 
and in demand ; wo quote gold bars at 870@S8i) ; silver 
bars re-main at par ; currency bills on Atlantic cities pay 
3:t p«t oent. premium on gold, a decline of 1 J$@l?4 per 

rant, since oar last. 

Tin' Marywville Savings Bank opened for business on 
the 17th of April last, and on tho 13th of July tho follow- 
ing report was made: Amount of deposits received, 
S1C.177 06 1 deposits withdrawn, $1,556 85; entrance fees 
received, $104; loans made, $13,850; loans returned, 
$500; Interest received, $171 '.15; organizing and other 
expenses, $342 ; number of depositors, 52 ; borrowers, 9. 
Olty Stocks. 

In shares, other than mining, wo note a very limited 
POSJoega. San Francisco Gas stock realized $83 ; Spring 
Valley Water, $i*>3 76; and California Steam Navigation 
Go., 59 pet cent. Of ourSaviiigs institutions, the French 
society ri_i>orts as duo depositors on tho 30th of June, 
$3,660,843 ; Savings and Loan, $5,053,543 ; Odd Fellows', 
and <';iliforuia Building and Savings Bank, (on 
May 1st) $716,060. At tho close, we note sales of North 
Beach and Mission Railroad at $70, and 20 shares of Om- 
nibus Railroad at $70 per share ; also $6,000 S. F. Bonds, 
7s, at 89 M. 

The returns of our local insurance companies to the 
Internal Revenue department for tho month of June 
and previously this year have been as follows, upon a 
currency basis of 74 cents on the dollar for the mouth of 
January, 77 U cents for February and March, 75 % cents 
for April, 73,'i cents for May, and 74!tf cents for June : 

Previously 

.Time. thi* year. 

Pacific 9123,834 1492,657 

Union 82,224 225,758 

Firfiinaus Fund 311.159 163,397 

California 9.230 

Merchants' Mutual Marino... 27,232 

Occidental 25,205 

Home Mutual 15,453 

Peoples' 20,355 



52,659 
131.531 

1HI.MI7 
68.797 



TWai 

8616,281 

257,t«2 
199,556 
61.889 
158.766 
136,012 
82,250 
97,1)51 



$1,321,205 
826,624 

Increase in 1869 $122,451 $-191581 $617,032 

The above statement shows a decrease of $1,636 from 
tin receipts in May. The receipts of the several com- 
panies in June as compared with May show tho follow- 
ing difference : 

tnervue. Decrease, 

Pacific $14,431 

Union. 9,657 

Fireman's Fund 11,321 

California. 218 

Merchants' Mutual Marine 1,149 

Occidental 377 

Home Mutual 3,195 

People's 3,460 

The receipts of the city railroads for the month of 
June and previously this year were as follows : 
Previously 

June. (hi/1 year, 

Oranibns $25,558 $120,362 

North Beacti & Mission 23,491 116,822 

Central 17,033 79,887 

FronfcStreet, Mission i Ocean 9.615 44,686 

Market Street 12,196 57,781 

Potreroand Bay View 3.702 14,127 



Total. 

$145,920 
140,313 
96,9*0 
54.301 
69.977 
17,829 



$525,320 
465,775 

Increase in 1869 $4,703 $54,842 $59,545 

As compared with the total receipts in May, we 
find a decrease of $10, n 4C. The receipts of June as against 
May show the following difference: 

TncrvaAe. Dt crease. 

Oranihns $1,898 

North Beach and Mission 3,343 

Central 2,099 

Front Street, Mission and Ocean 1,034 

Market Street 2,462 

Potreroand Bay View . 652 

3£ininsr share Market. 

During the past week, the mining share market exhib- 
ited considerable activity, though prices of leading stocks 
show a decline under quite heavy sales ; this may be re- 
marked of Chollar-Potosi, Hale & Norcross, Ophir, Savage, 
and Yellow Jacket. Of White Pine stocks, the offerings 
are on the increase, as well in the sale of shares as in 
companies placed on the list. 

Gouud Si Cuhry — was in the market to a limited ex- 
tent, at a decline. For the week closing July 19th, 284 
tons of ore were extracted, 323 delivered for reduction, 
and 256 tons remained on the dump at the mine, The 
shaft was cleared of water on the 18th, and work was 
resumed on the seventh station on the some day. The 
second station drift has been opend 500 feet, leaving 350 
feet more to clear out. 

Hale & Nonciioss — had a sharp fall, under quite large 
sales. The information regarding this claim is meagre. 
During the month of June, so far as reported, the bullion 
receipts aggregate 8120,500, and with the returns in April 
and May, foot up 5387,046 for the second quarter of the 
current year. 

Chollaii-Potosi — was largely dealt in since our pre- 
vious reference, at a small recession, but at the close had 
partly recovered. A telegram of the 21st stateB that 
*'the loss by the fire this morning is confined almost 
exclusively to the Company's buildings, and the lumber 
and timber, and will amount to considerably over 
$100,000; insured for $40,000. There was no pay ore 
. being taken out of the shaft where the fire occurred ; so 
there will be no interruption in the ore yield of the 
mine." During tho week ending July 16th, 1,798 tons of 
ore were extracted, and 1,630 tons were forwarded to the 
mills for reduction. On the 20th inst., $23,303 in bullion 
was sent to the office in this city. 

Yellow Jacket — has also met with more activity, 
selling at a slight decline. In the absence of official data, 
we have estimated the bullion product of this Company, 



for tho first six months of tho current year, at $680,000. 
An assessment of f 10 per share was levied on the MMh 
inst. At the recent annual election, John B. Winters 
was elected Pneidentj T. c. Taylor. Vice-President; 

-J. B, Winters, T. c, Ttylor, William Sharon. 

u, and J. li. Biaser. They voted $35,000 in aid 
of tho snfflsrerfl by the late fixe in this and adjoining 

mil i -. 

Orion— sold to a considerable extent. On the 20th 
but,, the drift was 4M feat in length, and the matt rial 
latterly puaed through is represented to show tnwtt of 

metal Imi>eiual met with small sales. The retini- 

bedng ol tho shaft is progressing well ; otherwise noth- 
ing special. 

The annexed tubular statement of bullion receipts, as- 
aetuiments and dividends, together with the hiphest and 
lowest prices of the stock of the various Comstock claims, 
explains itself. The product of the Yellow Jacket and Oc- 
cidental companies we have estimated: 



■"■ r - '/■ '■€• — - C V y, ~ 5 7. 



e p - 



■ wSifrsr 



raffs =?3 






: *■: oi 

i a: ?: 



a.- J : : ■ 






Rlija 



112a 



sass 
tri'i 



gS3SS8B»8SSSSS!5o.SS8SSi! 
SSSS§S3SSSS§3SS333SSSi 



ssisssisssissssssssss: 



T ±~ -J.- ,0- o- qc-im*.' 



■j> co c; "- ft> oe =j5> -o o * a. t» a; u ct 

SSSSSSSSSSS5!SS8€ 









: : SS: : : : : 



SiCi-.— ic ri ai j. -^ -/. ;~r;-i- 



-,„»1S 












2r 



We herewith present acondensed tabular statement rela- 
tive to the bullion product, (so far as can be ascertained) 
dividends paid, and assessments levied by the various 
mines on the Comstock Lode during the first six months of 
I860, together with the figures of previous like periods: 



Company. 


Bullion 
Product. 


Dividends. 


.Assess- 
ments. 








$30,000 




$8,280 








25,000 




10S,718 
18.88!) 
669,637 








31,200 




$42,000 






Consolidated Virginia 






17,400 
48,000 




93,914 
63,796 
34,345 
441. an 

230, 917 




Gold Hill Q. M. AM. Co.. 


96",06o' 


"■"10,666 






















243,772 


40,000 


20,000 






180,000 


20,000 






50,400 

128,000 




156,671 

4.83!) 

943,217 

88.165 

680,000 








280,000 
7,000 

360,000 
















First 6 months, 1869... 

186ft. . . 

" 1367... 

1866. . . 


13,955,701 

4.299,488 
7,064,653 

4,926,708 


$845,500 

1,100,150 

2,068.200 

526,000 


$467,700 
938.100 
440 680 
687,400 



' Estimated. 



The Mining and Scientific Preps, the only journal 
west of the Mississippi river devoted to mechanics, min- 
ing and the physical sciences, has juet entered upon its 
nineteenth volume. It is the most valuable publication 
to California miners, inventors and scientists published 
on the coast, and another department has beenfcidded de- 
voted to Agriculture, which will render it an excellent 
family paper for country folk. The Press is a very 
handsome 16-page sheet, ably edited, compilations and 
selections made with care, and contains all the latest 
discoveries of interest in the arts and sciences with fine- 
ly engraved illustrations. Published at San Francisco 
by Dewey & Co., Patent Agents. — Valle-jo Chronicle. - 



Weekly Shareholders' Directory, for 
Meetings, Assessments and 
Dividends. 

[Compiled for every Issue, from advertisements tn the 

Mining akd SetEimflfl PlUSS and other Sun 

KrancUco Journals.] 

Comprising the Names of Companies. District or County 
of Location; Amount and date of Assessment; Date ot 
Meeting; Day u! lH>lmn,uem Sale; and Amount and Time 
ol Payment oi Dividends. 

ASSESSMENTS. 
ITAJfK, LOCATION, AMOUNT, AND DAT DAT 

DATK Or ASSKHSMKNT. DKLINQOKNT. OF BALK 

Alpha Cons. Storey co., Nev„ June 5. $5 lulv 10— Jul v 31 

Blue Rose, White 1'ine, Mnv si, 5c July "lO-Auijunl 1 

Bulll. .11 1, siurevcn., Ncv. May -a. $hj. . Payable linmedluielv 

Bro.lt. White Pine, June 23, i5c .July 29-Sept 4 

Central. Storey co , NOV., Juiio2S, $2.60....Julv 24— Aug M 

Cusnla, Mexico. June 13, SI. 25 July 21— \uic r> 

CJermanla, While Pine, July 13. ific Aujr. i:i-Auc' 2(5 

Cons. Chloride Flat, \V. P., Mav28, $1 la'v 7— Julv 29 

Cherokee Plat, Butto cn„ June 2S. $5 Auii, 3— Ahb \» 

Chester, Whle.- Pine. June 2u, 16c Aug. 4-Au/ 25 

Cuba Con".. While Pine, June 24, 6c July 24— Aue Ji) 

Cayuira Chirr, Whit,- pit;,.. June 23, 10c July TO— A up' Pi 

Cordillera, Mexico, July 23, $1 Auj,*. 24-Sonl &* 

Bucklln, White Pin.-, .Inly 14. 6c A up. 20— Sent 10 

Bromide Flat, "Vlilte Pitip, July 12, 50c Auc. IS— SeDl 2 

Daniel Webster. White Piny, June 30. I5e..july30— Auir 10* 
Evening Slar, White Pine, June 25, lOc.Jidy 31— Aug "I" 

French, White Pi no, July 19,5c Aug. 24— Sent 1S« 

Oold Htll Q.. Storey co., .June 20. tl Aug 2-A.Uff 21 

fleo. Washington, White I'lne, Jnlv 1, 10c. Aug. 12— Aug 3(1* 

Hidden Treasure Cons., June 2'J, 50c Aug. 4— Aug 25 

Hidden Trewure, White Pine, Juno 29, 50c. Aug. 4— Aii"*25 

HopeOrnvol. Kovadaco .Juno 29, $1 Aug. 7— Aug' 2-1 

Ion, White Pine, July 14, 10c Aug. 19— Sent 21 

IX L, Alpine co .May 10, Ji 50 June 26— July 26* 

Imperial. Storev co., Nov.. Julv 14, $5 Aug. 18— Sept R 

Lyon M. & M., El Dorado co, Julv 21, $2. Aug. 30— Sept. 20* 

Kontuck, Storey co., Nov., June 14, $lli July 15— Aug 3 

Mazcppa, White Pine, June W, 10c Aug' 5- Sept 11 

Magenta, White Pine. June 21. 10c July 29— Sept 4 

Mahogany, White Pine, June 17, 10c July 23— Aug 13 

Mammoth Cave. While Pine, Julv 12, 10c. .Aug. 19— Sept 23 
Morning Star, Alpine co., July 21. $1,60. .Aug. 31— Repi l*»* 

Marlhorougb, White Pine, Julv 19, 5c Aug. 24-Sept 13* 

Noonday, White Pine, June 14,30c July 19— Aug Q 

North Star, Nevada co., June 4. $20 July 9— July 30* 

Ophir, Storey co. Nev., July 23, $3 Aug 25— Sept. lfi 

Oriental. Sierra co., July 21, S5 Aug. 21— Sept.fi 

Pinche, While Pine. April 6, 15c June 30-.Iuly30 

Pluenlx, White Pine, July 12, 15c Aug. 12- Sept! 30 

Rnthhnn, White Pine. June 22,51 Inly 27— Aug 14 

Silver Moon, Whim Pine, May 31, fie JuIylO- August I 

Silver Wave. While Pine, June 7, 20c July 8— July 28* 

Silver Vault, While Pine, July 1,5c Aug. 7— Aug. 28 

Silver Eagle, White Pine, July 14, 25c Aug. 16-Sept 6 

Thunderbolt, White Pine, July 1, 5c Aug 12-Aug 30" 

Virginia, White Pine, June 17, $1 25 Julv 28- Aug 11 

Virginia, No 2 White Pine, July 21, 25c. ..Aug, 2fi-Sept. II 

While Pine Water, June 23. $50 July 2S— Aug lfi 

Willlmnntie, White Pine, Mnv 20. 20c July 19-Aug 10* 

West California. While Pine, July 10, 10c ..Aug. 17— Sept. 25 
Yosemltc, Humboldt co., Nev., July 2, 50c. .Aug. 7— Aug. 24* 

Yellow Jacket, Storey co July 19, $10.. Aug. 18— Sept 17 

MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 

Alleghany, Sierra co Annual Meeting July 26 

Bromide Tunnel, White Pine AnnualiMeeting July 26 

Chester, White Pine Annual Meeting July 3o 

Columbus, Placer co Annual Meeting Aug. 2 

George Washiugton, White Pine... Annual Meeting Julv 23* 

Golden Rule, Tuolumne co Ailnual Meeting July 27 

Maxwell, While Pino Annual Meeting Aug 4 

Planet, Arfzoni Meeting July 28 

Rathbim, White Pine Annual Meeting Aug. 2 

San Fernando Tunnel, White Pine. Annual Meeting Aug 2* 

Sedgcly. White Pine Annual Meeting Aug. 2* 

While Cloud, White Pine Annual Meeting Aug. 2* 

LAST DIVIDEND. 

Amador Co., div. $8 per share Payable July 3, 1869 

Alpha Cons . Storey co., ^ev , div. 42 Pay. June 19, J8»8 

Bacon, Siureyco., Nev., div Payable June 19, 1868 

Coney, prPterred Slock, div. \% percent May 10, 1869 

Crown Point, dividend, £7.50 Payable Sept. 12, 186S 

Chollar-Potosi, div, $20 Payable J uly 7, 1S69 

Eureka, div. $5 Payable July 10, 1%9 

Empire M. & XL., Nev.. dividend $6. ...Payable May 15, 1867 

Gould & Curry, div.. $7-50 Payubte May 15, 1867 

Gold HillQM AM-dividend. $7 50... .Payable July 13, 18(58 

Golden Chariot, Idaho, div. $3 Payable June 15, 1869 

Golden Rule, Tuolumne co, div. 50c ijj eh..Pav. June 26, 18l>9 

Hale & Norcross, div. $6 Payable July 10, 1869 

Imperial, Storey co., Nev., div Payable June 20, 1868 

Industry. White Pine, div., $4 Payable July 1, 1869 

Keystone, Sierra co , div., $32 Payable May 6, 1869 

Kentuck.div-.S20 per share Payable Jan. 10,1869 

North Star, dividend, $5 Payable Aug. 15,1868 

Occidental, div. $2 Payable March 2, 1869 

Pacific Unassessable, div Payable June 18, 1868 

Sand Spring salt, dividend $1 Payable Jan. 5, 1869 

Santiago, Silver City, dividend, $2 50. . . Payable Dec. 19, 1868 
Savage. Virginia. Nev, dividend, $4. ..Payable May 11,1869 

Handsprings Salt, Virginia, div., SI Payable May 5, 1869 

Sierra Nev., Storey co„ Nev., div. $2,50 Pay. July 10, 1869 

Virginia &G. H Water Co.. Dividend, payable April 16,1869 
Yellow Jacket, div., $5 Payable March 15, 1869 

Those marfced flith an asterisk (*)are advertised In tola 
ournal. ^^^^_^^^^^^___ 

Latest Stock Prices Bid and Asked. 

S. F. STOCK AMD eXCBANOE BOARD 

Friday Evening, July 23, 186C.S 

MISCELLANEOUS STOCKS. Bid. Arted 

United States Bonds, 5 211s, 18 55, '6?, '68 $ — — 

United States Bonds, 5 2Us, 1864 — — 

United States Bonds. 5 2Us, 1862 87 S8 

Legal Tender Notes 7H% 74 

California State Bonds, 7s. 1857 95 — 

San Francisco Bonds, lus, 1851 par A int. 

San Francisco City Bonds, 6s. 1855 — — 

San Francisco City and County Bonds. 6s, 1858. 85 87^ 

San Francisco School Bonds, 10s, I860 100 — 

San Franci:cu School Bonds, IDs, 1R61 nar & int. 

San Francisco City and Co. Sch'i B'ds, 7s, 1866. 89 Cfl 

San Francisco City and Co. Bonds, 7s, 1862 89 90 

San Francisco City and Co. Bonds, 7a, 1864 89 90 

San Francisco Citv and Co. Bonds, 7s, 1865 89 90 

San Francisco City and Co. Judg. Bds. 7s, 1863. 89 90 

San Francisco City and Co . Judg. Bds, 7s, 1864. 59 90 

Sacramento City Bonds 35 40 

Sacramento County Bonds, 6s 70 — 

Marysville Bonds, 10s 75 SO 

Stockton City Bonds 65 — 

Yuba County Bonds, 8s ; 85 90 

Santa Clara County Bonds, 7s 76 77 

Butte County Bonds, 10s, 1860 75 — 

San Mateo County Bonds, 7s 75 — 

California Steam Navigation Co — 58^ 

Spring Valley Water Co — Qi% 

State Telegraph Co 25 — 

GAS COMPANIES. 

San Francisco Gas Co 84 84b; 

Sacramento Gas Co 62 54 

RAILROADS. 

Sacramento Valley Railroad — — 

San Francisco and San Jose Railroad — — 

Omnibus Railroad — 70 

Cen tral Kail road 50 — 

North Beach and Mission Railroad — 70 

Front Street, Mission and Ocean Railroad 11 12 

BANKING INSTITUTIONS. 

Pacific Bank 97J£ 100 

The Bank of California 150 160 

INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

People's Insurance Company 90 95 

Flremans 1 Fund Insurance Co 94 95 

Pacific Insurance Co 110 — 

Merchants' Mutual Marine Insurance Co 500 520 

California Insurance Co — 15U0 

Union Insurance Co 96 ltJO 

Home Mutual Insurance Co 19^ 20 

Occidenta I Insurance Co 85 91 

MINING STOCKS-WASHOE DISTRICT. 

Alpha 23& 24 

Baltimore American — .* — — 

Belcher S2>£ 23 

Bullion. G. II 17 17^ 

Crown Point 43 i%% 

Cole (Va.) 5 8 

Confidence 35 45 

Consolidated Virginia 6 10 



Chollnr-Potosi a>i> 

Danoy \"\\\ £g 

Exchequer ....'.'.'."."!!"" To 3 

Em pin- Mill and Mining Co 50 

Qould a Cntry 105 

Gold Hill Quartz "' (,71/ 

Bale .t Noreroaa, ' inn 

Imperial ' $9 

Julia '..'"." IV 

Justice and Independent " 78 

H5 tu S k ic.9 

Ludy Bryan • 36 

American 21U 

Occidental Jo" 1 

"i ,h|r '.'.'.*.!.'.";:::;::;;". w^ 

Overman 59" 

Segregated Belcher <tj£ 

Savage " * 79" 

sierra Nevada nw 

Union _* 

United States ,.', _ 

Yellow Jack ft " "" 531^ 

. A MISCELLANEOUS MINING STOCKS. 

Amador (California) 286 

Aurora, White Pine * 10 

Eureka, (California) 914 

Unlil.n Chariot (Idaho) 36 

SllverCord (Idiiho) fi 

Bnlrten Rule. California ".'.'."" — 

Mohawk (California) _ 

PocolUlo. White Pine ; , 3^ 



35 



San Prancisco Market Kates. 

Wholeaule Price*. 

„ _ Fiu dat, July 2: 
Flour, Extra, "ft bhl $5 Ou 

Do. Superfine 4 50 

Corn Heal,$j 10(1 lbs 2 00 

Wheal. $ Hid lbs 1 40 

Oats, ft 100 lbs 1 fin 

Barley, •?* 100 lbs 1 15 

Beans, %( 100 lbs 3 60 

Potatoes, ft 1U0 tbs ' 75 

Hay. ft ton 10 no 

Live Oak Wood, ft cord 9 00 

Beef, extra, dressed, ft lb 7 

Sheep, on foot 2 50 

Hogs, on foot, ft lb 5 

Hogs, dressed , ft ft 9 

GROCERIES, ETC. 
Sutrar, crushed, ft lb uw 

Do. China nj 

Coffee. Costa Rica, ft ft _ 

Do. Bio.: _ 

Tea, Japan, ft ft 75 

Do. G reen 60 

Hawaiian Rice, ft ft 914 

China Rice.ftft 6&? 

Coal Oil, ft Rallon 45 

Candles, ftft 16 

Ranch Butter, ft ft 35 

Isthmus Butter, ft lb 30 

Cheese. California, ft ft 1;, 

Eggs, ft dozen 42M 

Lard , ft ft lfi 

Ham and Bacon, ft ft 14 

Shoulders, ftft 8 

Ketull Prices. 
Butter, California, fresh, ft ft 50 

do. pickled, ftft 30 

do. Oregon, ftft 25 

do. New York, ftft 35 

Cheese, ftft 20 

Honey.ftft 25 

Eggs, «t dozen so 

Lard, ft lb i 8 

Hams and Bacon, ft ft 23 

Cranberries, ft gallon 1 00 

Potatoes, ftft tlj 

Potatoes, Sweet, ft ft _ 

Tom a toes, ftft 5 

Onions, ft ft 5 

Apples, No. I, ft ft 4 

Pears, Table, ftft 5 

Plums, dried, ftft iy 

Peaches, dried, ftft m 

Oranges, ft dozen 50 

Lemons, ft dozen 

Chickens, apiece 75 

Turkeys, ftft 30 

Soap, Pale and C. O 7 

Soap, Castile, ft lb is 



3, 1869 

ft: $5 50 

a 4 75 

@ 2 25 
® I 75 
@ 1 75 
@ 1 35 
@6 00 
@ 95 
fi*17 00 
@14O0 
@ 9 
@ 3 00 
@ 7 
@ 10 

® 15 



10 

4m 



id 

25 
30 



@ 60 
@ 1 00 
@ 1 00 
© 35 



San Francisco Metal Market 1 

PRICES FOR INVOICES, 

Jobbing prices rule from ten tofft'en per cent, higher thanltf* 
following quotations. 

Friday, July 23, 1869. 
Iron.— Duty: Pig, S9 per ton; Railroad, 60c ftlOOlbs; Bar, 
l@l^c ft ft; Sheet, polished, 3c ft ft; common, lk@13ic 
ft ft; Plate, l&c ft ft; Pipe, l>£c ft lb; Galvanized, 2>ic 
ft ft. 

Seotch and English Pig iron ft ton $40 00 @$42 fO 

White Pig ft ton 35 00 @ 36 00 

Refined Bar, bad assortment, ftft — 03 @ 

Refined Bar, good assortment, ftft — 04 @ 

Boiler, No. 1 to 4 — M>£@ — — 

Plate, No. 5 to 9 @ — 04K 

Sheet, No. 10 to 13 — 04W@ — 5 

Sheet, No. H to 20 —05 ® — 5U 

Sheet, No. 24 to 27 ~ 05 ©— 6H 

Copper.— Duty :_ Sheathing, 3%c ft ft ; Pig and Bar, 2>£c ft ft 

Sheathing, ft* @ — 26 

Sheathing, Ye"ow , — 20 @ — 21 

Sheathing, Old Yellow — 16 @ — 11 

Composition Nails — 21 ® — 22 

Composition Bolts , — 21 @ 22 

Tin Plates.— Duty: 25 ft cent, ad valorem. 

Plates, Charcoal, IX, ft box 12 00 @ 

Ptatcs, I C Charcoal 10 00 @ 10 50 

Roofing Plates, , 10 00 @ 10 50 

BaneaTin. Slabs, ft ft @— 35 

Pteel.— English Cast Steel, ftft @ — 15 

Quicksilver.— t3 ft.., — 55 @ _ 60 

Lead.— Pig, 'ftft - 7^@ — 8 

Sheet — 10 @ 

Pipe — ll @ 

Bar .~— 9 @_ 9 

Zinc— Sheets, ftft ■ — 10}£@— it 

Borax.— California, ft ft — 38 @ — 40 



^"Tobe Weak: is to be Miserable." — No 
matter by what cause the physical energies may 
have been impaired — whether the frame has been 
debilitated by over-exertion, or anxiety, or excess 
— Drake's Plantation Bitters will restore 
the staminal vigor of the system when all the 
prescriptions of the pharmacopoeia have utterly 
failed. This is a great medical fact, resting upon 
volumes of published testimony, and it cannot be 
controverted. Remember that decay is progress- 
ive — that chronic debility, unless checked by 
proper treatment, increases from day to day, and 
inevitably shortens life. Change the condition of 
the vital organization with this powerful vegeta- 
ble alterative — it imparts motive power to the 
inert animal machinery; bracing up the nerves, 
the body servants of the brain, and endowing the 
stomach with the healthful activity requisite to 
convert the duily food into a life-sustaining ele- 
ment. " To bo weak is to be miserable," says 
Milton. The blind poet was right. ##* 

The best place to get every different variety of 
spectacles to be found in the market is at C. Mid- 
ler's, 205 Montgomery street, near Bush. *^* 

America on Her Travels. — It ig esti- 
mated that there are not less than 300,000 
Americans making the tour of Europe, or 
temporarily sojourning there. 

Continental Life Insurance Cempany, 302 
Montgomery street, corner of Pine. * 



54 



Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 24, 1869. 



Mini?ig Summary. 



The following information is gleaned mostly from 
journals published in the interior, in close proximity 
to the mines mentioned. 



California. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

Leviathan. — Miner, July 10th: We 
learn from Mr. Wolf, foreman, that perma- 
nent operations will commence next Mon- 
day. The movement is sustained by Lon- 
don capital, and it is believed there will be 
no " let up " until the mine is thoroughly 
developed. 

Imperial looks encouraging M. CM. 

Will soon be able to treat ores of low grade 
with profit, it is thought. ... Globe still in 
quartoze rock with water coming in. 

Barnes' Claim. — Chronicle, July 10th: 
This— the Old Billy Bodgers' Claim— is 
promising. The shaft is down 135 feet, at 
which depth a drift is being run across the 
ledge. They are in fifteen feet The ore 
looks well, and Barnes has in contempla- 
tion the erection of a mill. 

Morning Stak. — Supt. Gamble is taking 
out ore, and getting along finely. George 
H. Ensign, the new President, will come 
from San Francisco next week to examine 
the mine. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

Bite's Mill and Mine. — Correspond- 
ence of the Mail, July 16th: Kite's Cove is 
22 miles from Mariposa. The new mill is 
thought to be above any high water that 
may come. Twenty stamps are grinding on 
an average 15 tons every 24 hours. Four 
of Knox's pans amalgamate the free gold; 
then follow two tanks for amalgam and sul- 
phurets; thence the pulp passes into "Eu- 
reka" pans, where it is reground; ,then 
into a large settler. BlaDkets are the last 
means used below everything else for sav- 
ing the sulphnrets. The remaining sands 
are heaped up with salt and exposed to the 
weather for several months. A regrinding 
then secures nearly all the gold. The last 
assay of these sands showed $548 per ton. 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

Gkass Valley. — Union, 14th : The Eu- 
reka yesterday had gold bricks which 
weighed altogether, 1,160 ounces, and were 
sent below. 

From New York hill there has been a 
crushing of 23 loads which yielded about 
$500 in coin. Ben. Macauley's mill did 
this last. 

The Idaho mine, for a two weeks run, 
sent below yesterday morning, bricks val- 
ued at §14,000. 

Blasting Experiments. — Same of 18th, 
Yesterday, at the Empire, some experi- 
ments were tried in blasting with the qual- 
ity of gunpowder, known as rifle powder. 
This was put up in cartridges and rammed 
down in the hole made by a three-quarter 
inch drill, and threw out the rock well. 
The experiments will be continued. An 
agent of one of the powder companies of 
San Francisco, is conducting the experi- 
ments. We understand that gun cotton, 
of improved manufacture, will soon arrive 
here from Europe, and will be tested in 
our mines. 

Banner Mine.— National, July 13th: We 
learn that this mine started this morning 
on the old basis, with black powder and 
double-handed drills. 

Call foe Machinery. — The fact that 
prospecting i3 active is proved by the fact 
that there is a great demand for second- 
hand machinery for hoisting purposes. 

Eureka. — This mine had a clean -up Sat- 
urday, after a run of ten days, which 
yielded 822,300. The bricks, which 
weighed 1,260 ounces, were sent down to 
San Francisco yesterday. 

New York Hill.— At Ben. Macauley's 
mill, 23 loads of rock from New York Hill 
have just been crushed, paying over $22 
per load. 

Idaho Mine. — This mine, after a ran of 
two weeks with fifteen stamps, has had a 
clean-up of $ 14,000. 

WmPenn. — Same of 15th: The shaft in 
this mine is sunk to the depth of 160 feet. 
A bout 25 feet more remains to be sunk un- 
der the present contract. The rock being 
taken out is of such excellent quality that 
it pays all the expenses of sinking. The 
ledge is large and well defined. 

Combination.— This mine, on the south 
side of Wolf Creek, has been worked in 
former years. A tunnel has been run in 
150 ft. A contract was let yesterday to 
continue the same. About 75 ft. more will 
stril e the ledge. 

Steep Hollow. — D. O. Wight, several 
years ago, run a bed rock tunnel for a 
gravel channel at the upper end of Steep 
Hollow. Beceutly he gave one-fourth of 
his ground to John F. Coe, who contracted 
to run 50 ft. for such interest. On the 4th 



of July Coe raised up two feet at the head 
of the tunnel and struck gravel which 
yielded a dollar to the pan. From half a 
car load that was taken out, $18 was real- 
ized. 

At the Cascades. — 16th: The Burring- 
ton HOI Mining Co. have been washing 
during the season and are doing first rate. 
They are now cleaning up and will be at 
it several weeks. So far the returns are 
good. 

Mining Patent. — The Allison Ranch Co. 
are applying for a patent to their mine. 

Mines at Eureka. — The Forest Bose 
Co. have been running for their ledge for 
some time, and have every prospect of 
striking it shortly. They have recently 
struck a large stringer, the rock from which 
is rich in free gold. 

The Jim Crack or Erie commenced work 
on Monday, Mr. Veatch having the charge. 
He intends taking out 200 tons of rock to 
be worked at Black & Young's mill. 

The Birchville mine has been paying reg- 
ular monthly dividends since December. 
Their 5-stamp mill is kept running, and 
the yield of the rock is excellent. 

Banner. — Gazette, 14th: There was a 
rumor yesterday that the Banner Company 
had discharged all their hands, and hired 
again those who struck some weeks ago 
against the giant powder. A gentleman 
who was at the mine last evening tells us 
there is no truth in the report. 

PLUMAS COUNTY. 

Argentina, Again. — Quincy National, 
July 10th: Last week we stated that we be- 
lieved this to be the richest in the State. 
During the week we have visited the local- 
ity. The company have run an open cut 
into the vein, about 40 feet deep. The rock 
is yellowish, not much harder than clay, 
with small seams of scraggy quartz here 
and there. The gold is not so much in the 
quartz as in the seams and rock around it. 
The mine is now demonstrated to be 1,000 
feet in length, with a breadth of 200 or 300 
feet, and in every part of it fine gold can be 
seen. The company have quit sluicing, 
believing that they were wasting more gold 
than they were saving. Killey & Archer 
have run a cut into the same vein, 600 feet 
from Heath & Co's, where the mine looks 
the same and pays as well. 

Bich Gulch. — The scarcity of water has 
been a drawback. Those who had water 
have done well. Capt. Corser's claim, with 
a small head of water, has averaged for the 
last three months, $8 per day to the hand. 
MclSeely & Co. have a rich claim, but have 
not had sufficient water to make any head- 
way. At 12-Mile Bar none of the compa- 
nies have cleaned up yet. Their claims are 
looking well. 

Sawpit Flat. — The miners have about 
finished cleaning up. Their claims have 
generally paid. 

SIERRA COUNTY. 

Quartz Discovert. — Messenger, July 
17th : A gold bearing ledge has been dis- 
covered in the neighborhood of Port 
Wine, and about 200 ft. located. The 
croppings assay $22 per ton. 

Bumobed Sold. — It is rumored that the 
Kanaka Quartz mine has been sold to a 
company of capitalists who will open and 
develop it. 

Iron Mine. — A quantity of ore from the 
San Sabra iron mines near Gold Lake, has 
been sent below to be tested. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

Joint Stock Company. — Yreka Union, 
July 17th : We understand that Mr. James 
Trimble and others of Oro Fino and vicin- 
ity, are taking steps to form a joint stock 
company for quartz mining. Trimble & 
Co. own a valuable quartz ledge, on which 
they are erecting a mill. They propose to 
form a company, with $50,000 stock, divi- 
ded into 1,000 shares ; to work this and 
other ledges in the vicinity. 

Mining at Oro Fino. — All mining at 
Oro Fino has been suspended for the sea- 
son, on account of the failure of water. 
But little will be done there again before 
next February or March. 
TRINITY COUNTY. 

Cox's Bar. — Journal, 17th: Sid. Cnne 
has sold his mining claim and ditch to 
William Wilshire and William McElvany. 
Amos T. Smith has leased his claims, water 
and ranch, to Thos. Cox, for three years. 

The New Diggings. — McCollum & Co. 
are doing well on Franklin (Sawmill) creek, 
finding gold in pieces from one to three 
dollars. Thos. Price has been getting from 
$5 to $21 to the pan. He picked up on the 
bedrock $100 in one day, in pieces of two, 
four and five dollars. 

Stewart's Fork Ditch. — A party of men 
who have been examining the ground, re- 
port favorably, and state that the line is 
located upon good ditching ground, and 
that there need not be more than one-half 
mile of flume. We are informed that par- 



ties now in town will perhaps proceed to 
organize a company to build this ditch. 

Arizona. 

Independence Lode. — Prescott Miner, 
July 3d : A. L. Molitor has shown us some 
rock from the Independence which will pay 
at least $30 or $40 per ton in free gold. 

Walker's District. — The creek and 
tributary gulches being almost dry, placer 
miners can do nothing until water comes. 

Lower Lynx Creek. — The Bashf ord Co's 
ten men are hard at work upon their ditch- 
es, etc. Jackson, Lovejoy & Co. are fixing 
up. 

Hassayampa. — Young & Scott, in the 
canon below the mouth of Copper creek, 
did not find very good pay. Stone & Vin- 
cent worked a bar above the canon, and we 
have been told averaged $10 a day each. 

Sterling. — Work is progressing. It is 
believed that the new mill will be com- 
pleted in a month. 

Chase — Work will soon be resumed. 
Becent letters from Paul to Noyes point 
out the cause of failure of the new process 
at the first trial. 

Wickenbueg. — A recent letter states that 
the new battery of Beese & Krause worked 
defectively. . . .A man has arrived from the 
new diggings near Walnut Grove, having 
in his possession several hundred dollars 

which he dug out there The Vulture 

mill was running. 

Colorado. 

Briggs Mine.— Central City Herald, June 
3d: Mr. Beech deposited at Warren, Hus- 
sey & Co's bank to-day a retort which 
weighed 404 ozs. 11 dwt., worth $9,000. It 
is the product of three weeks' run on the 
poorest ore in the Briggs mine. Thirty- 
five tons of ore, worth $100 per ton, have 
been selected for Prof. Hill, which makes 
the gross product of the mine for three 
weeks $12,500. The work has been inter- 
rupted during the past month by break 
downs and repairing. 

We saw a chunk of gold this evening 
which weighed 23 ounces 5 dwt., which 
came from one cord of ore taken from a 
new discovery in Peck Gulch. 

Pewabic. — One cord of surface quartz 
from Perrin's claim on the Pewabic lode, 
run in Bradley's new mill, Bussell Gulch, 
yielded 43 ounces gold, worth $23 per 
ounce, or $989 currency. 

Gold Shipments. — Same, July 12th: 
The shipments made by the three bankers 
of Central City from January 1st to July 
1st, 1869 — a period of six months — at cur- 
rency valuation, amount to $863,000. For 
the same time last year, $752,000. Increase, 
about $110,000. The shipment for June is 
less than it would have been but for the 
trouble about water in the mines. This 
will probably not interfere with the work- 
ing of the mines during the succeeding 
months of the year. We therefore antici- 
pate a mnch larger increase in the amount 
of gold produced for the last half of this 
year than the above figures show for the 
first We give nothing in this report but 
accurate figures, and therefore leave out 
the shipments of silver and Prof. Hill's 
shipment, which we may put down at $150,- 
000 for the six months. 

Oro City. — Denver News, July 14th: 
Mining operations going on smoothly. The 
owners of the Pilot lode last week began 
workiug the decomposed ore by the pud- 
dling process. The first cord and a half 
yielded 42 ounces of gold. The mine looks 
as well as ever. Capt. MeCannon is still 
prospecting his new diggings, and although 
he has not yet reached " bed rock," he 
thinks his prospects are good. 

Central City. — Register: Three and a 
half cords of ore from the Jones lode, Ne- 
vada, just run, yielded $1,761.86. One 
cord of galena ore from the same lode 
yielded under stamps 13 ounces gold bull- 
ion. This is something rare, as galena 
seldom yields gold. 

Idaho. 

Silver City Wave, July 13th : The Cos- 
mos milt will start up on Silver Cord ore 
about Thursday morning. 

The brick mentioned by us as the pro- 
duct of two tons of Sherman ore in Flint, 
weighing 452 onnces, assayed $9.36 in gold 
and $528.64 in silver— $538— being $269 
per ton. 

Bed Bock Mining Project. — Idaho City 
World, July 15th: The meeting held in 
this city in connection with the project to 
sink a shaft to bed rock to test whether it 
will pay to mine, has led to fair success. 
Through the exertion of the Finance Com- 
mittee about $1,000 has been contributed, 
and it is estimated that the work will cost 
$2,500. A stock company has been organ- 
ized to prosecute the enterprise. 

Bullion. — From Mr. DuRell, Manager 
of the Agency in this city of the First Na- 



tional Bank of Idaho, we learn that the 
treasure shipment to New York for June 
summed up $112,448.88 currency. We may 
be sure that the amounts forwarded to San 
Francisco by Wells, Fargo & Co., Great- 
house Bros., and private hands, would 
swell the total shipment to fully half a 
million dollars. Boise Basin is still rich in 
gold. 

Montana. 

PHn/LTPSBURGH. — New Nortliwest, July 
9th: The Hot Spring Co. struck the main 
ledge Thursday, and are now sinking a 5x10 
foot shaft through it. An assay just made 
showed over $1, 100 per ton — picked rock, 
however. Purvine, Ulery, Dennan and 
Heal, have succeeded in turning Flint 
Creek from its channel through a ditch 
ten feet wide and three deep. Keep & Bear 
are making preparations to sink on the 
Salmon lode — will commence on Monday. 
The St. Louis Co. announce their intention 
of starting up the mill about the first of 
August, and will run it as a custom mill. 
They already have about 300 tons of beau- 
tiful ore from their own mine on hand. 

Boulder. — There is a general scarcity of ^ 
water in Boulder as well as everwhere else. 
Work is suspended at Alta Gulch, and 
claims laid over till May 1st, 1870. At the 
Old Humbug diggings, ten miles above, 
one pipe and several ground sluices are 
still running. 

Blackpool — Our correspondent inform s 
us that there is only 300 inches of water in 
Tiger and Ohio ditches. Not over 100 men 
mining at Blackfoot and Carpenter's Bar. 
Some rich ground has been struck at the 
head of Prairie gulch, and near Washing- 
ton Gulch, but no details are given. 

Highland. — Prof. Swallow is now on the 
leads of the Highland Gold Co. , and in- 
tends to start up the mill soon. The aras- 
tras are running on Only Chance rock and 
are cleaning up about $1,000 per week. 

Nevada. 

COPE DISTRICT. 

Elko Independent, July 14th : A Mount- 
ain City correspondent, an experienced 
miner, writes us, 10th : " The mines of 
this district are richer than the most san- 
guine anticipated. The ledges are looking 
finely, and the ore improves in quality as 
depth is attained. The richness of the 
mines is now established beyond a doubt, 
and no fears are entertained of their per- 
manency, as the ledges are found to be reg- 
ular and well defined. Several discoveries 
have been made, among which may be 
mentioned the Hamilton, a vein of very 
rich ore full two feet wide." 

Bich Obes from Cope. — We received 
last evening, from friends in Mountain 
City, specimens of ore from the Blue Bell, 
Fuller, Estella, Mammoth and Great East- 
ern mines, which compare favorably with 
the best ores of the richest silver mines in 
the State. Some of the specimens contain 
native silver. 

More Ore from Cope. — Same of 17th: 
On Thursday, Col. Drew arrived with a lot 
of ore, which he intends to ship by rail for 
reduction. This ore is from the California, 
and when its yield is made public, it will 
effectually stop croakers. 

Cedar Pass. — New discoveries in the vi- 
cinity of Cedar Pass are attracting atten- 
tion. The ledges are large and well-de- 
fined, ranging from 5 to 20 feet Samples 
of the croppings have been assayed in this 
town which yielded $53 per ton in silver 
and $3 per ton in gold. 

Col. Frank Drew has shown the Terri- 
torial Enterprise the result of the working 
of three tons of ore from the Magenta. It 
went $9.30 in gold and $470.60 in silver. 
The Col. started back to Cope last evening. 

Excitement. — A telegram, dated Elko, 
20th, is as follows: "Parties are leaving 
daily for Cope, taking with them tools, 
provisions, etc. , for the purpose of locating 
and developing. One lot of rock from the 
Argenta mine, assayed at this place, showed 
$2,900 to the ton. Another from the Cali- 
fornia assayed $2,700." 
HUMBOLDT. 

Unionville. - — Grass Valley National, 
July 16th: Mr. J. D. Jennings, who is 
largely interested in mining in Unionville, 
Nevada, is now on a visit to Grass Valley 
to purchase machinery. He gives a flatter- 
ing account of a number of silver ledges, 
including one owned by J. C. Fall, the 
Stewart, Alpha, and the National series. 
Bock from the Fall ledge prospects from 
$20 to $4,000 per ton. Near Star City ex- 
cellent gold diggings have been discovered, 
and miners are making from $15 to $20 per 
day to the hand. 

Quit Work. — Elko Independent, 14th: 
A correspondent writing from Unionville, 
Tuesday, says: "Fall has just returned 
from San Francisco, and ordered that min- 
ers shall work ten hours, instead of nioe. 
This the miners refuse to do, and have 



July 24, 1869.] 



TI\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



55 



quit work. Stewart, of the Silver Mining 
Co., has gone to the mines to get his men 
to add an hour to their labors. This move 
is maile by the mine owners in order to 
introduce Chinese, as they know the min- 
ers will not work ten hours. They can say 
white men will not work for them, and they 
are compelled to employ coolies. The 
whole move was pnt up with this in view. 
I am of the opinion that this will prove a 
very warm climate for Chinamen yet." 
WASHOE. 

[ In the Stock Circular, in another por- 
tion of this paper will be found late mining 
news from this district ] 

Prospects. — Gold Hill News, July 16th: 
The principal cause of the depression in 
mining stocks is the condition of the Crown 
l'oint, Kentnck and Yellow Jacket mines, 
owing to the still-existing lire. No ore is 
produceable from the Crown Point, and 
comparatively little from the Kentuck. The 
Yellow Jacket is improving, owing to the 
increased circulation of air, but in these 
three mines hundreds of men are thrown 
out of employment, and the production of 
oro is absolutely nothing to what it used to 
be. Looking ahead, say four months, we 
can see a vast improvement. 

Yellow Jacket. — July 17th: More men 
at work, and 200 tons extracted daily. 
Nothing new in Crown Point or Kentuck, 
except that measures are being taken to 
work the lower portion beneath the fire, 
through the 900-foot level of the Yellow 
Jacket. 

Hale & Norcross. — Lower level looks 
as well as ever. Yield is over 100 tons 
daily. South drift develops a fine streak 
of ore five or six feet wide, assaying nearly 
§00 per ton. 

Gould & Curry. — Shaft repaired — water 
out by tomorrow. Upper levels yield 50 
/tons daily, assaying 850 per ton. 

Sierra Nevada. — First clean-up for the 
mouth made yesterday — comes up to the 
average. Everything prosperous. 

Savage. — Nothing new. Eeceipts $20,- 
000 less than two millions, and disburse- 
ments, including dividend, $35,000 over 
two millions. Cash on hand July 1st, 
847,000. 

Chollar-Potosi. — Yields 250 tons daily, 
mostly from the Blue Wing. Profits of 
the year, 8236,000. Cash on hand June 
1st, 8168,000. 

Virginia Consolidated. — New shaft 136 
feet deep to-day. 

Imperial-Empire. — Upper levels still 
yield ore, but will be worked out in a few 
months. Extensive repairs required. As- 
sessment of $5. 

Yellow Jacket North Works. — Enter- 
prise, 15th: The repairs to the shaft are not 
yet concluded; therefore the hoisting of 
that 300 feet of water has not commenced. 
The big tubs and all the apparatus for dis- 
charging the same are in readiness. The 
building itself is being altered to suit, and 
the aspect of everything is materially 
changing. 

Chollar-Potosi. — The shares in this 
company have been increased to ten times 
their former number, so that the present 
quotation of the stock at 830 per share or 
thereabouts, is just equivalent to the for- 
mer one of 8300. 

Virginia Telegrams. — 19th: The bullion 
shipment by Wells, Eargo & Co. , on the 
17th, was eight bars, 559 pounds, valued at 
811,505.37% ; by Pacific Union, twelve 
bars, valued at 810,704.85. Total, $22,- 
210.22. 

There are rumors of a strike in one or 
more of our mines, but I am unable to 
trace the rumor to a reliable source. 

The Yellow Jacket Co. voted 82,500 for 
the sufferers by the fire in their mines, and 
levied an assessment of $10 per share to 
cover it and other expenses growing out 
of it. 

Delinquent stock in the Kentuck mine 
will be sold August 3d. 
WHITE PINE. 

The Strike. — The News thinks the re- 
duction of wages was an unkind move for 
the Eberhardt to make, because it could 
better afford than any other company to 
pay the old price. In its issue of the 12th, 
it says: " Our own theory is, that the re- 
duction of wages is a job put up to bear 
White Pine in the stock market. Eberhardt 
is not in the market — the fortunate owners 
have none to sell — but has come to be re- 
garded as the representative mine, the oth- 
ers to be more or less affected by its repu- 
tation. To get the word abroad that the 
Eberhardt has put down wages of workmen 
because the rock will not pay, is to put 
Hidden Treasure, Pocotillo, Chloride Flat, 
aud the other stocks, down." 

Some of the leading mines are still idle. 
Others have reduced their working force. 
The contract system, — says the Mining Re- 
view of the News for the week ending 



17th, — will probably supersede that of 
wages altogether. The Eberhardt has let 
a contract to have 20 tons of ore extracted 
per day. Several other companies have 
also let contracts; and in some cases the 
pay will amount to less thau .-?4 per day to 
the miners. The mines look more promis- 
ing than ever. The News advises all those 
who have the blues, owing to the new 
break, to go and look at them. We quote: 
"The Empire and Grattan shipping their 
first bullion to-day; the Evening Star Con- 
solidated, Blair and Banner State, Excel- 
sior, Sam Slick, and others, sending their 
first ore to mill ; the Star and Stewart, Old 
Ned, Guardian, Paris, Chester, Hemlock, 
Olive, Oswego and others, piling up their 
first-found ore and enlarging their dumps 
to receive it; then take a glance at the ore 
breasts of the Consolidated Chloride, the 
two Auroras, Pogonip and Othello; go 
down into the Mazeppa and see the glitter- 
ing wealth there; examine the great masses 
of rich chloride, and horn silver in the 
Original Hidden Treasure, and for the pure 
stuff see the little Posthole; go look at the 
rich mass of ore recently unearthed in the 
Pocotillo, the mountain of chloride bored 
by the tunnel, shafts and drifts of the Vir- 
ginia, the fine ledge struck by the Noon- 
day, 90 feet down, and a hundred other re- 
cent developments which promise returns 
for well-directed labor and capital. White 
Pine promised well four mouths ago — its 
inestimable wealth is now in sight, and 
tangible. " 

Bullion. — We have no returns of bull- 
ion shipped for Saturday and Sunday last, 
nor for yesterday, and therefore foot up the 
four intervening days at $46,701.23, being 
$13,597.96 less thau the shipment of last 
week. 

Mills and Smelting Works. — John 
Tregloan has gone to Forest Hill, Placer 
County, Gal., to pack up and ship for 
White Pine a 10-stamp mill, of which he is 

part owner there The Treasure mill 

(Big Smoky) is being changed to a dry 
crusher. Will be completed by Thursday. 
. . . .Mosheimer's Smelting Works will be 
in full blast this week .... Telegram of 16th 
says: Logan & Co's mill at Swansea will 
commence active operations on Monday 
next. 

Outside Districts. — The Telegram has 
seen some ore from Beveille district which 
is covered with horn silver. An average 
specimen assayed $2,900 per ton. . . .Twelve 

or 15 men are at work in Tern Piute 

Accounts from Patterson are cheering. 
Mills are wanted. The Empire of 17th 
heai-s of men who have returned from there 
with large samples of excellent ore, which 
will run into the $400 to the ton, who are 
desirous to give half of two good ledges 
and 400 tons of ore on the dump, to any 
capitalist who will erect a mill in the vicin- 
ity of their claims. A Mr. Garnish is ne- 
gotiating for a mill near Austin, to be re- 
moved to Patterson district. Three more 
loads of the machinery for Martin & Da- 
vidson's mill, also for Patterson, are ex- 
pected to arrive to-day from Elko. A ten- 
stamp mill for Patterson has already passed 

through Hamilton Highland is a new 

district 150 miles south of Treasure City. 
Material is on the way, — says the News of 
the 17th, — for furnaces to be constructed 
there. 

Items. — News, 12th: The Excelsior had 
a ton and a half of ore crushed on Satur- 
day which yielded $102 per ton 13th : 

Workmen in the Boohinger slate quarry, on 
Union street, struck quartz below the slate 
yesterday afternoon, containing rich chlo- 
ride ore On Mount Ophir the Buena 

Vista has shipped ore to mill, that went 
$1,222 to the ton. The Caroline has traced 
chloride 1,000 feet, all the way. Several 

other claims have got fine ore 14th: 

Bich strike in Pogonip and Othello, north 
shaft.... 15th: Pocotillo has 40 tons first- 
class ore on the dump 16th: The Ophir 

beyond Babylon, on the Base Metal Bange, 
is developing finely Edward Apple- 
garth, of the Eberhardt, has purchased the 
Mazeppa mine entire, and will start work 
in it on Monday, with three 8 -hour shifts 

of miners Empire, 15th: Argument in 

the case of the Aurora Consolidated and 
Earl closed last night. Decision reserved 

until Monday Telegram, 12th: Southern 

Slope tunnel is now 80 feet in length. In- 
dications good for metal in 15 or 20 feet. 

New Mexico. 

Pinos Altos. — San Diego Union, June 
30th: The mines at Pinos Altos have 
stopped work. It is alleged that the sus- 
pension is made for the purpose of freezing 
out a few small stockholders. The mines 
are very rich, and are located on the route 
of the proposed Southern Pacific Railroad 
— 32d parallel. 

The Anderson and Stone mines, at 
Apache Pass, have all the machinery up and 



ready for work but have not started as yet, 
owing to the scarcity of funds to pay the 
expenses of running. We saw the agent a 
few days 6iuce on his way out with the 
money, so that wo may expect to hear good 
news from these mines, shortly. 

Moreno. — Lantern: Maxwell's mill in 
two days' run produced 116 ounces. . . .The 
amount of gold shipped since the 1st of 
June by express, private parties, etc, will 

foot up at least 500 ounces per week 

Assays made by Prof. T. G. Bounds, from 
the Swansea lode, returned 8430 in gold 
per ton. He selected the ore from a shaft 
but 12 foet deep. 

Oregon. 

Bich Strike. — Jacksonville Sentinel, 
July 10th: The owners of the Malachi 
quartz ledge on Lightning Gulch, iu Jo- 
sephine County, have struck rich pay. 

Mining at Steamboat City. — We learn 
that the ditch of Sturgis, Titus & Co. , is 
finished. There is 200 inches of water in 
it, taken from the right hand fork of Ap- 
pletou Creek. The ditch is 5% miles long. 
The claims comprise 800 yards of the gulch 
below Steamboat ledge, and are probably 
the richest in tho county. On main Ap- 
plegate, Harriot's river claim is paying 
well, pieces weighing from ten to fifteen 
dollars being frequently found. Epperson 
& Herbold are getting good prospects. A 
Chinese company are putting in a wing 
dam below. 

Wyoming. 

Sweetwater Mines. — State Capital Re- 
porter, July 16th: Z. Swaringer, has just re- 
turned from the Sweetwater mines. There 
are 3,000 people in the district. The 
ledges are extensive and well defined. 
The principal lodes are the Miner's De- 
light and Mineral Star. Thirty-six tons of 
ore from the former, at mill yielded an av- 
erage of $56 per ton, and several hundred 
tons from the latter gave au average of $45. 
Five mills are now in operation, and six 
more will be completed before the close of 
the season. These are being erected by 
Eastern capitalists. The principal placer 
mines are on Rock Creek. They proved a 
partial failure last season but are now being 
worked with success. A stratum of gravel 
has been struck beneath what was thought 
to be the bedrock, which pays half an 
ounce a day to the man. 



Peter Funk. 

This well known New York public func- 
tionary sends us an advertisement of his 
business, in tho most unexceptionable busi- 
ness style, and under the substantial look- 
ing names of "Stewart, Hall & Co., No. 
193 Broadway," office of the " Empire Gift 
Company." Peter (who is an ex-special 
policeman and quite a politician) announces 
inducements to the financially hopeful as 
follows: 

"A chance to draw any of the above 
prizes (pianos, sewing machines, watches, 
etc.) for 25 cents. Tickets describing 
prizes sealed in envelopes aud well mixed. 
On receipt of 25 cents a sealed ticket is 
drawn without choice, and sent by mail to 
any address. The prize named upon it 
will bo delivered to the ticket-holder on 
payment of one dollar. You will know 
what your prize is before you pay for it 
Any prize exchanged for another of same 
value. Satisfaction guaranteed. Six tick- 
ets for$l; 13 for $2; 35 for $5; 110ior$15." 

Here is an opportunity to try the inter- 
esting experiment of putting twenty-five 
cents through a hole. 



A New Industry — California Car 
Wheels. — After experimenting for a num- 
ber of weeks at the foundry of the Sacra- 
mento Valley Railroad works, says the Fol- 
som Telegraph, car wheels equal in all 
respects to those sent from the East are 
being made, and six wheels are now being 
cast daily at a less cost than they can be 
procured elsewhere. There is every rea- 
son to believe that in a very short time all 
the wheels required for use on this coast 
will be cast here, thus opening a new 
branch of mechanical industry in this 
State. There is nothing like enterprise 
and energy when rightly directed. Mill- 
ions almost have been sent from this State 
to the East, which by properly directed 
efforts might have been retained here. 

The East River Bridge, — soon to join 
the city of New York and Brooklyn, — will 
form a gentle arch, with a span of 1,600 
feet, and in the center will be a clear 
bight of 135 feet above low water. The 
largest ships must strike their top-gallant 
spars to pass under, but all others will 
find space and to spare. The survey for the 
structure has been completed,' and the ma- 
terials are being prepared for the abut- 
ments on the river shore. 



A Wholesome Railroad Law. — A law 
of Ohio enacts that each railroad in the 
State shall, when necessary to heat any of 
its ears, do so by heating apparatus so con- 
structed that the fire in it will be immedi- 
ately extinguished whenever the cars are 
thrown from the track and overturned. 
The same law provides that the cars shall 
be lighted by candies only. 

The Future Republic. — When our 
country shall be as densely populated as 
Massachusetts is to-day, we shall number a 
population of 600,000,000, and when it 
reaches Great Britain in point of density, 
our population will number more thau 
860,000,000. 



A Great Conflagration. — The great 
conflagration produced by the burning of 
the overflow of the oil springs near the 
Caspian Sea, is said to have extended over 
a surface 700 miles long by 200 wide. 
Nearly all the fish in the sea were destroyed, 
aud a great destruction was caused to veg- 
etation for miles around the shores. 



Catching Whales by Electricity. — 
The Engineer says that H. J. Rogers has 
submitted a proposal for this to the Soci- 
ety of Civil and Mechanical Engineers. 
Practical whalemen seem, it is said, to 
think favorably of it "A galvanic bat- 
tery is placed in the whaling boat with a 
powerful induction coil in communication. 
From the terminals of the battery two in- 
sulated wires pass as conductors, through 
a line of the size ordinarily used to the har- 
poon, which is made with two heads, sepa- 
rated from each other, each insulated wire 
passing through the harpoon to the points 
where they terminate. The handle of the 
harpoon is of course insulated. In this 
harpoon the circuit would be complete 
when it struck the whale. According to 
another plan, one insulated wire passes 
from one terminal through the rope to the 
end of a harpoon having one point only, 
the other insulated wire hanging in the 
water, aud acting as a means for the return 
current The experiments have been tried 
on eels and other small fish without perfo- 
rating the skin. The two wires from the 
poles of the battery being simply directed 
in close proximity to each other towards 
the fish, or one wire at the head and the 
other at the tail, and the effect has been to 
produce rigidity and complete temporary 
paralysis, the eel and other fish appearing 
perfectly lifeless during, and even after the 
period of contact. 

Dectdedly Frenchy. — The Pall Mall 
Gazette says: "The invariable failure which 
has hitherto attended nautical expeditions 
to the Arctic regions has induced two 
Frenchmen, Messieurs Tissandier and de 
Fouvielle, to undertake the enterprise of 
leaching the North Pole in a balloon. The 
machine iu which the bold adventurers are 
about to embark on their perilous journey, 
and which is appropriately named ' Le 
Pole Nord,' is now being completed in the 
Champ de Mars, which the government 
have placed at their disposal for the pur- 
pose. 

The monster balloon, beside which even 
the famous Geant would seem a mere toy, 
will contain over 10,000 cubic meters of 
gas, and is composed entirely of a cloth 
manufactured from caoutchouo, which will 
allow of great expansion in the rarefied 
strata of the atmosphere. The seams unit- 
ing the different pieces form a total length 
of three English miles. The car, a marvel, 
it is said, of strength and lightness, is con- 
structed to carry ten passengers, 4,000 
pounds of ballast, and provisions for a 
month." 



English vs. American Shipping. — The 
people of the Mississippi Valley, who are 
making such a laudable effort to secure a 
cheaper transportation for their grain to 
to Europe via New Orleans, instead of 
Chicago, are obliged to go to England 
get their ships. Although a portion of the 
stock will be taken by capitalists in this 
country, the ships will be mainly owned 
and entirely run on English account. The 
high price of labor and stock in this coun- 
try has done more to break down American 
shipping, and transfer our foreign carry- 
ing trade to English bottoms, than all the 
raids of rebel cruisers during the war of 
rebellion. 



56 



;Tl\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 24, 1869. 



llNING AND SCIENTIFIC 13EESS. 



W. B. EWER Senior Editor. 



A. T. DEWEY. W. B. EWER. 

IXEWJbTS" «fc CO., ru.T>lisllers. 



Office, No. 41* Clay street, below Sansome. 



Tern* of Subscription: 

One copy, per annum, in advance S5 00 

One copy, Bix months, in advance 3 00 

KTT'or Bale by Carriers and Newsdealers."^ 



Oitr Agents. 



Our Friends can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cau6e of practical knowledge and science, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their 
influence and encouraging favors. We intend to send 
none but worthy men. 

Traveling Agents. 

E. M. Dewey, California. 

Wit. H. Murray, California and Nevada. 

Dr. L. G. Yates, California. 

Isaac D. Street, Oregon. 

Resident Aeents. 

Oakland — W. H. Hardy. 

Caltfornia and Nevada — S. H. Herring. 

Sacramento — A. S. Hopkins, No. 70 J street. 

Treasure City, Nev.— J. L. Robertson. 

Shermantown, Nev. — T. G. Anderson. 

Helena, Montana — E. W. Carpenter. 

Black Hawk, C. T. — Harper M. Orahood. 

Central City, C T. — Richards & Crane. 

Georgetown, C T. — John A. Lafferty, Postmaster. 

Denver City, C T. — Woolworth & Moffat. 

Cheyenne, D. T. — Robert Beers. 

Omaha, N. T. — Barkalow & Brothers. 

London — George Street, 30 Cornhill, E. C. 

A. C. Knox, City Soliciting and Collecting Agent. 

@a.n Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, July 24, 1869. 



Notices to Correspondents. 

Bacchus. — Fusel oil is scientifically known 
under the name of ami/lie alcohol. In 
some form or condition it affords all the 
flavors of various spirits, be they called 
whiskies, brandies, arrack, or any other 
names. Amylic alcohol, or fnsel oil, is 
an antiseptic. From experiments it has 
been found that when its vapor is in- 
haled, the effect is first to produce irri- 
tation of the nostrils, afterwards drowsi- 
ness, followed by a kind of coma, but 
not accompanied by insensibility to pain. 
This is attended by a peculiar muscular 
action and rigor, which increases in force 
under excitement. It has never been 
found to destroy life. Animals brought 
to the verge of death, and apparently be- 
yond recovery, soon rally after being 
placed in the open air. 

Bltje Nose. — According to a paper written 
by Mr. G. F. Matthews, and read before 
the London Geological Society, the rocks 
exhibited in the southern portion of New 
Brunswick, resemble very much in char- 
acter those found in the greater part of 
Canada and the northwestern portion of 
the State of New York, namely: I. The 
Laurentian formation — Portland series; 
IL Huroniau series— Coldbrook group; 

III. Lower Silurian — St. John's group; 

IV. Upper Silurian; V. Middle and Up- 
per Devonian; VL Lower Carboniferous; 
"VTL Carboniferous, with a small surface 
covered with Trias and modern allu- 
vium. 

C. H. A. — You have been reading the ar- 
ticle on the Rivot process hastily, and 
quote it incorrectly, as you will see on 
re-perusal. A chemical formula, fur- 
thermore, is not necessarily, nor usually, 
an "equation." Its chief object is to 
state results, the equation mark (=) be- 
ing merely a convenient form of putting 
it into type. You suggest that protox- 
ide, not peroxide results, plus some vol- 
atile sulphur. In point of fact it is prin- 
cipally peroxide, but there remains some 
intermediate protoxide. The S could 
not well pass through fire in the presence 
of oxygeu without becoming SO 2 . If 
you can find errors in the Mining and 
Scientific Press as often as the Scien- 
tific American, we will be glad to be re- 
minded. 

Bird Fancier, Alameda. — The food of 
small birds varies much according to 
season, as respects both qualities and 
quantities. Insectiverous birds are at 
some seasons as eager in the pursuit of 
the larva), as of the mature insect; at 
others, worms and analogous minute rep- 
tiles are sought. As a whole, the weight 
of food consumed by small birds is of 
an animal rather than a vegetable type. 
The buds of some trees are occasionally 
destroyed by the feathered creation, but 
this happens most frequently in conse- 
quence of searching for some more de- 
structive grub that lay concealed under 
cover of such buds. 

G. B. E., from Treasure City. — Deceived 
too late for insertion this week. Letters 
have also baen received from correspond- 
ents at Gold Bun, Nev., Vallejo, Cal., 
and from Quincy, to which due attention 
will be given next week. 



Capital for Mining. 

" Nothing can be done without capital," 
is the wise conclusion arrived at by many a 
miner who has had the advantage of expe- 
rience. But capital does not, in these 
times and in our midst, adequately appre- 
ciate a really meritorious mining property. 
So much the better for energetic, practical 
men, with little or no capital, who do ; for 
a good mine, we know, is now and ever 
will be, as substantial a thing as coin itself. 
After a thoroughly intelligent compre- 
hension of the situation in a mining enter- 
prise, capital to work with is the all-im- 
portant consideration ; but the cart must 
not go before the horse. The mine-owner 
should know the ingredients of his ores, or 
have advice thereupon from such practical 
expert as can be depended upon, together 
with the quantity that can be got out at a 
certain cost, how to choose the most suita- 
ble process for beneficiating, etc. To err 
on these points would wreck not only the 
owner, but the capital that might come to 
his aid. 

It has best suited a majority of the mon- 
eyed operators of San Francisco to buy and 
sell rather than to work mines— a method 
of procedure learned and adopted by them 
from experience, to some extent, it must be 
admitted. Failure in procuring dividends 
in mining is to be taken, however, just for 
what it is worth. Shrewd business men 
point to the generally alleged fact that 
mining, on the whole, swallows up as 
much capital as it yields. Yet we know 
how many in our midst have had their start 
in other business by a success in mining. 
Ws ought not, in justice, to reckon with 
the calculation aught but intelligent and 
legitimate mining, — so different from mere 
speculation, or from the wild and imagina- 
tive fortune-hunting which characterizes 
even capitalists on this one subject, that 
seems to touch the selfish principle in men 
so closely as to annihilate their usually 
governing commercial reasoning. 

San Francisco capital has been, up to the 
time of the inroad of "Chicago fiats," an 
anomalous institution, operating in a pe- 
culiar manner; with many features which 
are attractive and interesting to a student 
capable of grasping financial subjects. 
Touching its influences upon mining in 
Nevada, the Hamilton daily Inland Empire, 
an " emancipated " newspaper, says the 
following very sharp things: 

' ' So general has been the practice of 
San Francisco capitalists to" freeze out" 
small owners, and by means, too, less hon- 
orable than is the highwayman s practice 
of obtaining his fellows' valuables, that 
now men dread to see these same grabbers 
obtain a foothold here. The Comstoek 
has furnished a history which it is not 
pleasant to contemplate; a history which 
it seems to us no well-wisher of White 
Pine would care to see repeated here. 
Without very much capital to start with, 
a ring of banking operators, in connection 
with the old " Stock Board " of San Fran- 
cisco, through' a systematized course of 
"bulling' and "bearings" secured the 
ownership of almost the entire mother 
vein of Nevada in their own hands. It 
is useless to prate of good management on 
the one hand and want of thrift on the 
other. There is a general sense of justice 
in the hearts ot men which rebels at such a 
conclusion. Besides, we are all familiar 
with the way that unnecessary assessments 
were formerly levied, of the unnecessary 
expenses to which all the mines were sub- 
jected, until small owners were starved or 
sold out, and the poor man was obliged to 
give up for naught his title to a fortune. 
By this we do not mean to say the mon- 
eyed men of San Francisco are all rascals ; 
we do not meau to say there are no mon- 
eyed men in San Francisco who are hon- 
est. But, as regards the treatment of Ne- 
vada by these people, we have stated a gen- 
eral rule, which has no more exceptions 
than other general rules. At the same 
time we would not recommend our people 
to eschew San Francisco. There is cap- 
ital there, which, if it were brought here 
and expended, would benefit both the rich 
men there and the poor men here. Our 
people ought to know by this time what to 
depend upon when dealing with the meu 
of California. Perhaps we might fare no 



better with the sharp men of the East in 
mining transactions. There would, how- 
ever, be one advantage with the latter 
which has never been realized with the 
former. They would bring a large Cap- 
ital here, and invest their money liberally, 
and they would place us in direct corres- 
pondence with markets that would deal 
generously with us — and that is more than 
San Francisco has ever done with its de- 
pendent interior. In addition, they would 
wean our people from a mistaken idea of 
the value of coin over the general medium 
of exchange in the East, and thus take us 
out of the clutches of a San Francisco 
money ring which can create a financial 
stringency at pleasure." 

Let the fact be remembered by those in- 
terested in mining undertakings that this is 
a field to look to for great gains, for untold 
profits under a shrewd and intelligent man 
agement, which at the same time will in- 
sure the systematic capitalist under all 
circumstances against loss. Let no good 
business man who has money invest it in a 
mine until he has had the benefit of the 
judgment of one or more reliable, practical 
experts iu that business. Let him go over 
all the points himself when so pointed out 
to his comprehension. 

Capitalists who merely buy and sell do 
not need such assistance ; it is a matter of 
indifference to them whether the mine is 
destined to pay well or poorly ; whether 
its yield is to be permanent, or whether its 
prospects are utterly unreliable. Evidently 
so long as our practical mining interest 
looks to this class of capitalists for the 
means of working and development, there 
will be mismanagement — much of it, and 
of the grossest kind ; for speculators' in- 
terests are not essentially dependent upon 
the exercise of the best possible judgment, 
and upon keen practical calculation — upon 
which alone rests the certainty of mining 
as an investment. 

It is about time that mine-owners and 
manager's should possess a little judgment 
on these subjects ; should learn to distin- 
guish between the reliance to be placed 
upon practical and scientific experts and the 
impractical or unqualified, who sometimes 
beguile them. It is time, too, that intelli- 
gent mine managers should know just how 
far a good Cornishman's judgment con- 
tinues to be the best thing to be followed ; 
likewise how far practical millmen who 
have learned pan amalgamation by recipe 
or by apothecary experiments, can be de- 
pended upon for the percentages that belong 
to the bar shipment account, rather than 
to the tailings. Intelligent capitalists of 
course understand these points, and know 
full well how to take care of their own in- 
terests. But what shall be said of those 
mine-owners operating or found "holding 
on " in the interior who do not deem it im- 
portant to be informed up to the mark, 
who cannot afford to or do not see the good 
of subscribing for a mining journal ; who 
have nothing to learn from professional 
men in a business requiring so much skill, 
experience, general knowledge and science, 
as mining, and beneficiating to profit ? Sa- 
pient individuals of this class flourish in 
many a mine and mill who are yet furnish- 
ing the advice and " talk " to those capital- 
ists who buy and sell, or to the greenhorn 
capitalists who are accidentally in posses- 
sion of money which they wish to get rid 
of in so fine a business as imaginative 
mining. 



Mission Woolen Mills. — Miss Annie E. 
Dickinson and party visited these works 
and the Pioneer Knitting Mills last week, 
examining them with a great deal of inter- 
est and satisfaction. The works were in 
full operation, turning out large quantities 
of superior goods. At twelve o'clock over 
two hundred Chinamen were found seated 
iu the dining hall, operating their " licee " 
with chop sticks, affording an amusing 
spectacle to the visitors. It would take a 
long article to describe a visit to these mills, 
and we will only add that our compliments 
are due to the intelligent gentlemen that 
showed us around. 



Sensible Views. 

We would call especial attention of our 
readers to the remarks of Mr. Baymond, 
Commissioner of Mines, made before the 
Academy of Sciences, on Monday last. 
The views there expressed are eminently 
sensible and practical. We fully concur 
with Mr. Baymond in his remarks gener- 
ally, and especially in his expression that 
" the license given to all citizens to mine 
freely on the public lands ought not to be 
so construed as to permit claims to be held 
without being worked." 

The evil of speculation without capital 
was well and truly set forth, as well as the 
flagrant wrongs which have resulted from, 
and are still inherent in our present mining 
laws, enabling lazy and dishonest persons 
to reap the fruit of the honest labor of oth- 
ers, thereby encouraging trickery and indo- 
lence. There was also much truth in the 
remark that our miners are constantly mak- 
ing and wasting knowledge, instead of util- 
izing it We regret that we are not able to 
present to our readers a more full report of 
his really practical and interesting rem arks. 
Mr. Baymond leaves this city early in the 
week for Oregon and the mines of Idaho, 
from which latter ho will make his way 
to the Pacific Bailroad on his way home. 
By the time of his arrival in New York Mr. 
B. will have traveled fully 15,000 miles in 
accomplishing the mission to which he has 
been appointed for the present year. 

The State University. 

The Board of Regents of the State Uni- 
versity held a meetings on Tuesday last, 
which was devoted ■ mainly to the con- 
sideration of the report of the Building 
Committee. This committee, consisting of 
Messrs Butterworth, Hallidie and Sachs, 
reported — 

First — That the plans executed by 
Messrs. Wright & Sanders be adopted. 

Second — That the building designated in 
the plans as the College of Agriculture, be 
erected as soon es possible. This building 
will furnish thirteen recitation rooms, two 
lecture rooms, a faculty room, a reading 
room, and a temporary library room, mu- 
seum, cabinet rooms, etc. Estimated cost 
in brick, with stone dressing, $140,000. 

Third — That a separate building be 
erected containing chemical laboratory, etc. 
Estimated cost, .$55,000. 

Fourth— That a small building be erected 
as a magnetic observatory, in place of the 
rooms so designated in the plan of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. Estimated cost, 
85,000. 

The report waa considered and acted 
upon in detail; the several recommenda- 
tions being adopted, and the Executive 
Committee authorized to take measures to 
commence the buildings as soon as the 
question of the State's title to the site was 
finally settled. 

Letters were received from Professors 
Carr and Swinton, accepting the Profes- 
sorships to which they were elected at the 
last meeting. 

Judge Sawyer of the Fourth District 
Court yesterday rendered a decision con- 
firming the title of the University to the 
1G0 acres of land, (the Berkley tract) do- 
nated to them by the College of California. 
This decision was the result of a friendly 
and agreed case. 



Fare ard Freight. — It seems to be pret- 
ty well conceded now that the through fare 
for emigrants will soon be placed at $50 
from New York and about 838 from Omaha 
— the two roads, it is said, having agreed 
upon apro rata of division on that scale. 

Freight charges onfruit, it is understood, 
will be five cents to Chicago and seven 
cents to New York. The first car was 
loaded with fruit under the new arrange- 
ment at Sacramento on Thursday. About 
ten tons were carefully arranged in the car, 
including peaches, nectarines, apricots, 
pears, apples, limes, plums, prunes, grapes, 
figs, and samples of some of the minor 
fruits — the object being to determine what 
could and what could not be sent through 
in good condition. 



.Irr.v 24, 1869.] 



Tlcye Mining and Scientific Press. 



57 



New Method of Preserving Fruit 

Mr. .T. S. Houghton, in tlio Hardener's 
:, of Philadelphia, desoribes a new 
method of preserving trait, which baa been 
recently perfeoted and patented by Mr. 
c B. Bees, of Philadelphia, which prom- 
ises to ho of great value to pomologists, and 
dealers in fruit. Mr. It. waa extensively 
engaged, during the war, in packing meat 
and food for tho various naval squadrons, 
and out of this experience was developed a 
method of cooling a meat or fruit room by 
the aid of a small quantity of ice, so that 
both a low temperature and an almost per- 
fect dryness of atmosphere is attained at 
ono and tho some time, without artificial 
absorbents. Tho prinoiple is economical, 
simple, and easy of application to either 
stationary rooms or movable vehicles, as 
ears, ships, etc. A thorough ventilation — 
tho great lack in tho usual mode of preser- 
ving by ice— is obtained by this invention. 

While in Philadelphia, a few months 
since, Mr. Houghton, briefly explained to 
us this process, and showed ns the inven- 
tion in practical use, in that city. It is 
based upon simple natural laws, and we 
were told that partially decomposed fruit 
placed in a room to which this invention 
was applied, soon became dry; and in cases 
where more incipient docay had com- 
menced, the spots so speedily became cov- 
ored with a thin pellicle, that decomposi- 
tion would often be entirely arrested. 
This drying process does not reach to tho 
shrivelling of the fruit, but only so far as 
to remove the external moisture, and 
thereby preserve, in its natural and healthy 
state, the interior or pulp of the pear, ap- 
ple, or other fruit. We hope soon to be 
able to give a more particular and full de- 
scription of this process, which no doubt 
might be advantageously applied to cars 
employed in the transportation of fruit 
from California to tho Atlantic States. 



The Miners' Strike at White Pine. — 
We have given, in our Mining Summary, 
the theory of tho White Pine News with 
regard to the strike. Since that was in 
typo we have received a letter from an 
attentive correspondent who writes of 
this movement, under date of July 18th, as 
follows : — The strike, as it is commonly 
termed, still continues, but will no doubt 
close this week. Most of the leading mines 
will reduce the pay of their hands to-mor- 
row to four dollars, and with the exception 
of a fow of tho best men, that will be the 
rate of wages. The Miners' Union has 
opposed the reduction, but by giving a 
few contracts they will be neutralized. " 



A Virginia telegram of tho 21st an- 
nounces the total destruction of the Chol- 
lar Potosi's new hoisting works. Every- 
thing but the iron work was consumed. 
Tho company's boarding house, also, and a 
largo amount of wood and timber, were de- 
stroyed. The men all escaped through the 
Hale & Norcross shaft. The tiro originated 
in a defect in the chimney where it passed 
through the roof. Loss about $200,000. 



The State Agricolt ural Society has 
issued its official programme for tho State 
Fair, whieh is to commence September 6tb, 
and continue till the 11th inclusive. Pre- 
miums to the amount of '$20,000 and seven 
gold medals are offered for excellence in al- 
most every variety of useful industry, in 
which human hands and human brains can 
engage. 



Bad Policy. — It costs about as much for 
the ferriage of a load of goods across the 
bay to Oakland— six miles— as it does to 
transport the same goods from this city to 
New York via Cape Horn. Eight dollars a 
load is charged for a service of twenty-five 
minutes. Some of the transportation com- 
panies of this State are getting daft; the 
people will not stand such impositions 
long. 



Have We Solved the Problem of 
Flying? 

The "Avitor" Hying machine has been 
brought to San Francisco, and is now in 
tho Mechanics' Institute Pavilion,— a large 
building well adapted to a testing of the 
principles of Hying on a small scale — 
whoro a number of mechanicians and in- 
ventors woro on Tnosday last afforded tho 
opportunity to judge for themselves of the 
merits of Mr. Marriott's invention. 

The accompanying engraving represents 
the Avitor as it is supposed sho will appear 
when making her first trip over the 
Golden Gate. Tho propellers are here rep- 
resented as working below the wings; but 
in the model at the Pavilion they work in- 
side, showing both abovo and bolow. The 
working of tho model has also suggested 
some slight improvement in tho proportions 
of the machine, which aro faithfully rep- 
resented in the engraving. 

So long have men been accustomed to 
doubt in regard to tho practicability of fly- 
ing — of aerial navigation at will — so an- 
cient is the fancy and desire of the in- 
genious " lord of creation " to share in the 
liberty of the denizens of tho air, yet so 
uniformly have all his longings been 
thwarted on a par with tho illogical and 
impossible perpetual motion, that the wise, 



our oracular grandfathers' verdict on the 
problem of Hying V 

Mr. Marriott's "Avitor " is not, in tho 
ordinary souse, a balloon, sineo it rests, 
like tho living things of tho air, firmly 
enough, though lightly, on tho ground 
while its two windmill propellers aro at 
rest. Tho engine-fire having been lighted, 
this monster Hying fish astonished us by 
taking its departure aerially so much in 
the manner of a living bird taking wing 
that tho sensation of witnessing it was 
something refreshingly novel. 

It is by a combination of threo principles 
in aerial navigation, — all of them perhaps 
essontial, and all applied in the rationale 
of tho bird, — that tho inventor has here 
added to tho actual points of experiment 
heretofore tested iu tho history of tho at- 
tempts to fly. Tho bird is light, it has the 
necessary mechanical means of taking hold 
upon the atmosphere, — just as we are able 
to take hold of water or of a ladder or 
steps to lift ourselves; and, at tho instant 
of exerting its liftingforce it has a forward 
gliding on tho plane of its wings, the effect 
of which is to elevate, on tho principle of 
the kite. So far as we are aware, only two 
of these principles have been heretofore ap- 
plied in ono and the same machine. Tests, 
very useful and valuablo as money-saving 
means for future experiment toward a so- 




THE "AVITOR" FLYINfl MACHINE. 



the elderly-minded whose hopes are not of 
budding life and progress, have long con- 
tinued to shake their heads with the world's 
full acquiescence in their wisdom. " Man 
was never made to to fly;" yet he swims, and 
even amphibiously under water, which is 
more contrary to his nature than flying. 

Had one of our conservative grandfathers 
entered the Pavilion, as we saw a number 
of men do on Tuesday, just as the Avitor 
arose from the ground and coursed through 
the air past the astonished gazers at the 
door, (guided only, and held down, by 
strings fore and aft,) they would have in- 
stantaneously reconsidered the soundness 
and the profundity of their wisdom, and 
admitted that flying, after all, may yet be 
accomplished. A sun-fish shaped, like- 
wise very fish-like colored thing about 
the size of a fifty-ton schooner, was seen 
making aeronautic saches, — evidently flying 
to and fro without support and entirely of 
its own accord, like a thing of life; the 
propelling power being a 45-pound alcohol 
lamp steam engine, secreted from sight, 
driving two windmill or propeller fans, one 
on each side, and scarcely visible as the 
machine was traveling by. 

The sight was, to all present, inspiring, 
for how could it fail to reawaken in the 
spectator the fond idea that men are yet 
destined to fly and that he may live to see 
the happy day ? Has not the Pacific Rail- 
road been built ? Nothing, says the in- 
ventor and physicist, can hinder or pr event 
that result but a want of more thorough 
adaptation of our means to ends. After 
man's conquest and the wielding of more 
than ten thousand giants' ceaseless power of 
steam ; of the Titan's prerogative to rend 
mountains asunder with powdor; after his 
mastery of so almost spiritual a thing as 
light in photography; after assuming our 
Maker's attribute of omnipresence in cir- 
cum-mundane telegraphy, — and after a 
century of lubberly ballooning itself, may 
we not begin to question the soundness of 



lution of the problem of aerial navigation, 
havo been made methodically and are still 
being made by tho London Aeronautical 
Society, the results of which will greatly 
redound to the honor of the founders and 
patrons of that body of scientific mecha- 
nicians. From these, it would appear, that 
an engine alone, including its fuel, can not 
exert a sufficient power to overcome its 
own very considerable gravity; and even 
with an inflated gasometer to overcome the 
latter, the problem of flying has not been 
a success. Neither has power combined 
with the plane, or kite principle, been found 
wholly practicable. It is not certain, how- 
ever, but that with lighter engines — elec- 
tric motors or aluminum machinery possi- 
bly — and more perfect screw fan contri- 
vances, the Aeronautical Society may yet 
arrive at more favorable results on some of 
these questions. 

The Avitor is worthy of a new local sen- 
sation at least; and for aught we can see 
may be the beginning of success in flying. 
Difficulties that are or may be encountered 
will give impulse to and call forth skill of 
others amongst our numerous body of act 1 
ive inventors. Locomotion is demonstrated 
to be possible. Once started, the least 
amount of bodily exertion will propel the 
machine a hundred miles of distance; but 
the true principle of aerial navigation, we 
apprehend, will bo to take advantage of 
aerial enrreuts, which are exceedingly in 
teresting, being regular, and capable of be- 
ing mapped out with almost the accuracy 
of rivers. A small amouut of power ex- 
erted in a direction slightly varying from 
these currents, analogously to steerage or 
trimming sail to the wind, would be 
enough to carry the voyageur whithersoever 
he lists; to old California, by some current 
like the summer coast winds, thence either 
to the Sandwich Islands by the trades, or 
in the exact reverse direction by the coun- 
ter trades which flow, according to Maury, 
at a higher altitude witli equal regularity ; 



or to Arizona and the Mormon domains yb 
the summer winds from the Gulf of Mex- 
ico. With what immediate interest will wo 
study the geography and physical features 
of distant lands ? 

The Irishman's trouble of " stopping too 
suddintly " in a breeze, the starting and tho 
landing of aerial craft, are problems that 
should not outreach the ingenuity of man. 
Hero is where has been found the principal 
source of disaster iu ballooning. Ono 
thing at a time, however : birds, too, must 
select their perch. We hope that Mr. Mar- 
riott's energy in connection with the larger 
machine which it is proposed to build, will 
givo to the world a demonstration, by 
long voyages, of a working method of 
giving direction to tho " flight " of an aerial 
vessel, as tho big flying fish in tho Pavilion 
demonstrates it to be perfectly practica- 
ble on a scale just large enough for tho ac- 
commodation of the inventor's " dog 
Jack." • 

Fifteen months ago San Francisco first 
heard of tho aotual Avitor. A large sized 
one was then constructed, but it did not 
fly. Such a result, in a flying machine, was 
with many conclude of failure. The dif- 
ficulty was curiously insignificant: it was 
found that a gas bag cannot be filled with 
light gas if it is distended at tho beginning 
and consequently filledj with air. Tho 
frame is now to be outside, and the balloon 
oan be filled from a collapsed state accord- 
ing to the usual practice. 

The Crystal Palace Company, of En- 
gland, havo offered $250 to the exhibitor of 
amachine which should carry and be worked 
by a steam engine or other motive power, 
and sustain and move itself in the air for 
twenty minutes, at a hight of ten feet from 
the ground. Whether this machine ever 
arrives at any commercial success or not, 
we see no reason why its projectors may 
not bo able to secure the above reward. 



Tit for Tat. — Late accounts from China 
state that a secret society has been organ- 
ized there, having for its object the exclu- 
sion of foreigners from the Celestial em- 
pire. The opposition has not yet progressed 
so far as to assult foreigners in the streets; 
but merely contents itself with issuing 
proclamations — probably threatening vio- 
lence; although w are not advised as to 
the character of such proclamations. The 
Chinese are evidently fearful, if foreign- 
ers are allowed to come at will, that junks 
will have to make way for steamboats, 
palanquins for railroads, and man-power 
forsteam-power, generally, etc. Well, those 
pagans, after all, aro not so very much be- 
hind the " most enlightened nations " of 
the earth. 



Alarmed. — The London News is fright- 
ened at the exodus of Englishmen from 
Liverpool. In a single week, nearly 7,800 
left. This unprecedented eflux is no 
doubt chiefly due to the fact that the im- 
politic labor strikes and associations, 
throughout the land, have sent abroad an 
undue report of the prices and demand for 
labor in this country. 



Shipping in San Francisco. — There 
were, a few days since, twenty -nine vessels, 
with a capacity of 25,517 tons, loading at 
the wharves in this city for distant ports. 
There were also, at the same time, thirty- 
eight vessels, having an aggregate of 27,- 
019 tons, awaiting employment. 

Personal. — A. B. Bowers, C. E., author 
and publisher of tho celebrated farm map 
of the county of Sonoma, and other works, 
has taken steps to secure through our 
agency his right to a new iuvention which 
looks fair to supply a great want, and add, 
perhaps, millions to the wealth of this 
State. 



The Bight Thino. — A society for the 
.protection of Chinese has been formed in 
this city. It will find a plenty of work to 
do, and we presunre it will do it. 



58 



T}\e Mining and Scientific Press. 



[July 24, 1869. 



Professional Cards. 



J. S. PHILLIPS, M. E., 

CONSULTING ENGINEER, 
Examiner of Mines* etc., 

4S3 Washington street San Francisco. 

(Having had 33 years' experience in Europe and America,) 
supplies drawings and designs for Pumping, Hoisting, 
Crushing Separating, Roasting, Chlorinizing, Milling, Lix- 
iviating, Precipitating', and Smelting Works. Minerals an- 
alyzed, and advice given tor beneficial treatment. Les- 
sons on the Discrimination and Assay of Minerals by Blow- 
pipe, Chemicals, Scorifler and Crucible. 4vl7tf 

GEORGE B. ELLERY, 
Practical Mining Engineer, 

TBJE1SU1U! CIXX, 

White Fine Nevada. 

2,19tf 



JOHN EOAOH, Optioian, 

Has removed from 522 Montgomery street to 
510 Washington street. 

East of Montgomery. 

Surveying Instruments 111:1k 1 , repaired and adjusted 

22vl7-3ro 



JAMES M. TATLOE, 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 

Court Block, 636 Clay Street 

• SAN FRANCISCO. 

2vl5-lqy 

GILES H. GRAY. J ,M6S 11. BATEfi. 

GRAY & HAVEN, 

ATTORNEY S AND COUNSELORS AT LAW, 

In Building of Pacific Insurance Co., N. E. corner Call- 
fomiaana Leio&sdor ft streets, 
27vl6 SAN FRANCISCO. 



H. G-. ROWLEY, 

ATTOENET ARTS COUNSELOR AT LAW, 

OI.8 Merchant street, 
Between Montgomery and Kearny. P. O. Box 2102, San 
Francisco. lvlfltf 



DR. N. T. WHITCOMB, 

Ko. 205 Third street, o p stairs, Son Francisco 

Teeth filled with fine gold, artificial hone, and platina. 

All Plate Work made and repaired of the best material, 
at the shortest notice, and warranted. 

None cheaper and better on this coast — coll and examine 
specimens. 

North Beach and South Park cars pass the door. 

3vi9 3m N. T. WHITCOMB. 

.DR. KNOWLES, Dentist, 

HAS REMOVED FROM MONTGOMERY 
. to 331 Kearny street, west side, between 
■ Pine and Bush, San Francisco. 
2lvia-ly 



y^ MEUSSDORFFER, ^ 
HAT MANUFACTURER 

And dealer In 

Hats and Caps 

AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

635 and 637 Commercial street San Francisco. 

125 J street Sacramento. 

Corner of D and Second streets Marysvillc. 

72 Front street Portland, Oregon. 

Our wholesale House, 628 Commercial street, extending 
through to 637 Clay street, San Francisco, contains always 
a most choice, and the largest, assortment in this State. 
Every Steamer brings the latest Issued novelties from Eu 
rope and New 7ork, which can be found at all the above 
stores, at moderate prices. 23vl6-3m 



BIsklrA'c Dfltnnt THE BEST PUMP for Boiler 
laKL » raw " 1 ' 1 Feeders, Breweries, Sugar Hous- 
es, Tanneries, Mining ana Fire pur- 
poses, etc.. Is Blake's 

IS PUMP 

It IB SIMPLE, COMPACT 000 POWERFUL 

needs no expert to run it. and will 
stnrt lit any point. Is warranted 
positive under nit circumstances. 
Send for a circular. W. O. M. 
BERRY &■ CO.. U4 California St., 
(■.Son Francisco, Cut. 




PAIEBANK'S PATENT 




Metallurgy. 



MOSHEIMER'S 

PIONEER MINING SCHOOL, 

— AHD— 

METALLVK6IC WORKS. 

Having established the first Practical Mining and Metal- 
lurgical School in the United States, I would call the at- 
tention of gentlemen who may wish to obtain a practical 



knowledge of 

Chemistry, 



Assaying and Metallurgy, 



That I am prepared to teach all the above branches in les 
time than in any European School. 

I also undertake to assay and work any kind of ore, or 
mineral substances. 

For terms, apply to JOS. MOSHEIMEK, 

Practical Chemist and Metallurgist. 

OfBce, 328 Montgomery street; Metallurglc Works, 2005 
Powell street, San Francisco. 6vl8-6m 



LEOPOLD KUH, 
Assayer and Metallurgical Chemist, 

(Formerly of the U. S. B. Mint, S. F.) 
Office, No. 611 Commercial Street* opposite 

the Mint, San Francisco. 

BULLION MELTED AND ASSAYED, 
Tne correctess of which is guaranteed in every respect 
All kinds of Ore and Mineral tested, assayed and analyzed 
in the most satisfactory manner. 

Refers by permission to W. C. Ralston, Cashier Bank ol 
California; Messrs. Pioche & Bayerquc, Wm. M. Lent, John 
D. Fry, E. Cahill & Co., A. K. Grim, President Pacific Union 
Express Co.; John M. Eckfeldt, M. and R. U. S B. Mint; 
Hale & Norcross S. M. Co., and the principal mining com- 
panies on the Comstock Lode. 25vl7-tf 



PROF. HENRY WURTZ, 

Formerly Chemical Examiner in the U. S. Patent Office 
may be employed professionally as a Scientific Expbwt. 
GeologicalExamlnatlousand Reports, Analysisand Assays, 
etc., etc. Practicaladvice and investigations in the ("hem 
ical Arts and Manufactures. Invention and examination 
of new chemical methods mid products. Address, 2(1 Pine 
street, Rooms 35 and 3(1, Now York. Always in from 12 to 
3.30. jOS™ Written communications preferred. 

Important to Gold and Silver Min- 
ers and Companies. 

PROFESSOR "WTJXtTZ, 

Who is the Inventor and Patentee of the new and wonder 
nil uses of SODIUM IN WORKING GOLD AND SILVER 
ORES AND JEWELERS' SWEEPINGS, will furnish at the 
above address nforrnation in relation thereto, together 
with experimental packages of 

SODIUM AMALGAM. 

All Instructions and experiments elsewhere obtained are 
Spurious and unreliable. WORKING EXPERIMENTS ON 
AMALGAMATION OF ORES, Etc. Prof. W. has In opera 
tlon In New York a large and sum 11 Hepburn Pan, for work 
intr 1,000 or 20-lb. charges of material lor experimenta 
purposes. 3vl7-ly 



H. TAYLOR. WM. H. TAYLOR 

ROBERT TAYLOR & CO., 

METALLURGISTS. 

SMELTING WORKS, 

Twelfth street, between Folsom and Howard. 
GA LVANIZING. 

Also, Antl-Frlctloii, Alloys for .Journals, Type 

and Stamping Metals, Tinners and 

Plumbers' Solder, Etc. 

OSP-Thc best price given for the most rebellions or re- 
fractory ores. Ores and minerals assayed and analyzed. 
ISAAC BLVXOME, Agent, 
4vl8 3m N. E. cor. Washington and Battery streets. 



G. W. STRONG, 

ASSAYER AND WORKER OF ORES, 

No. 10 Stevenson street, near First,San Francisco. 

Highest price paid for choice lots of Ores, Sulphuiets, A* 
say Ashes, Sweepings, etc., etc. Students instructed in ah 
branchesof Metallurgy, on liberal terms. 
Uvlsor. 



OCCIDENTAL 

Insurance Company, 

OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
Ca-.li Capital. ...... $300,000 

GOLD COIN. 

Office S. YV. corner of Slontgomery and 
California streets. 

Fire nn*l Marine Insurance. 

All Losses paid in U. S. Gold Coin. 

CHR. CHRISTIANSEN, President 
B ROTBScniLD, Secretary* 20vl7-3m 



Business Cards. 



PLATFORM SCALES! 

Also, large Scnles for weighing londed wagons of Ore, 
Hay, etc., trom 6,000 to 40,000 pounds capacity. Manufac- 
turer's Branch House, 

KAIKIIAXKS A HUTCHINSON, 
I-- 1 California street, San Francisco. 
AgentBfor Baldwin's Improved Money Drawers, 
aacSendfor a Catalogue. lSvl><eow6m 



Blanks, Blank Mining Books 

Constitution and By-Laws 

— TOR — 

Mining' and Prospecting 

Companies 

Elegantly printed, with care and dispatch, at the office of t h <"> 
Alining and Scientific Press. 

Orders from the interior faithfmv attended to. 



RODGERS, MEYER & CO., 

OOMUVTISSIOTT MEKCHANTS, 

ADVANCES MAKE 
On all kinds or Ores, and particular attention 

PAID TO 

CONSIGNMENTS OF OOODS. 

4V16.3D1 



OA.RX> P I C T TJ K E S, 

ONE DOLLAR PEE DOZEN, 

And Photographs, Ambrotypes and Sun Pearls, by first 

class artists, at the lowest rates, 

At SIITA'S, «■! Third Street, 

Northwest corner of Mission, ----- San Francisco. 

llvlS-3m 



NATHANIEL GKAY. 



H. U. GKAT. 



N. GRAY & CO., 

UNDER TA.3SLEKS, 

641 Sacramento St., cor. Webb, San Francisco. 

05r*Solc Agents for Barstow's Metallic Burial Cases and 
25vl4tf Caskets. 



Farmers and Mechanics 
BANK OF SAVINGS, 

No. ~£ » Snntome Street. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Money Loaned on Real Estate. 
H. BUTTON, President. 

GEO. M. CONDEE Cashier. 19vl6-3m 



M. S. BUCKELF.W- GEO. LAMB. R. GROOM, 

BUCKELEW & CO., 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Choice Teas, Groceries and Provisions. 

HSO Market street, 

Below Montgomery street. 17vIS-3m 



W. T. ATWOOD, 

FURCHASER OP 

OOPPEE OEES, BAES, MATT Etc., Etc,, 

S05 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

The highest market price paid for ores assaying 10 per cent 
and upwards. 23vl7n.r 



Trades and Manufactures. 



WM. IiAkTLlNG. 



HENRY KIMBALL. 



BARTLING & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDERS, 

Paper Eiders and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

GOS Clay street, (southwest cor. Sansome), 
15vl2-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



•JOHN DANIEL, 

(SUCCSSSOB TO O. GORl) 

MARBLE WORKS, 

No. 421 Pine st. bet Montgomery and Kearny, San Francisco 

Mantels, Monument-, Tombs, Plambers* Slabs* 

Etc., On hand and Manufactured to order. 
j&> Goods shipped to all parts of the State. Orders re, 
spectfulli solicited. fiv8-3m 



J. M. STOCKMAN, 

Manufacturer of 
PATTERNS A.TST* MOr>:E:LlS, 

(Over W. T. Gamut's Brass Foundry, 
S. E. Corner of Mission and Fremont 8ts., 
6vHtf SAN FRANCISCO 



BAN PRANCI8CO MII.Ii. 

HOBBS, GILMORE & CO., 
Manufacturers oi Boxes, 

Slarket Street, bet. Beale and Alain. 



I>. C. HALL «fc CO., 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Ale, Porter, "Wine and Liquor Merchants, 

OlS Market street, Sun Francisco. 

BSPCifv and country orders promptly attended to. Mer- 
chant, Shippers and Families supplied in large or small 
quantities. 3vl9 3m 



To Quartz Mining Companies. 

Tobesnld positively within the next three months— the 
MINES, ENiilNK, MILL, mid .niirr Machinery .,,' t lie 
TEMPLAR NO. 2 Quart/. Mining Company, loca'led at In- 
diana Ranch, Yuba County, consisting of— 

One Steam JSnglne, GO horse power, made by Burden, 
Brooklyn. New York. 

Two large Boilers, in complete order. 

One Eight-stump Battery. 

One Chile Mill. # 

One Cornish Lift-Pump, 6 inches, of superior make and 
finish. 

280 feet of 5 inch Iron Suction Pipe. 

One large Water Tank. 

And also ail of the necessary machinery, with Belting, 
Feed Pumps, Hose, Turn Tables, Cms, Ropes, Track Iron, 
Flumes, Plates, wi.h Blsicksmith Shop and all Tools and 
requisite implements to be found in a large and first class 
quartz mill. 

The Company having ceased operations intend selling off 
their effects asspt-eilily as possible. 

For Particulars as "to price, etc., address, by letter or 
otherwise. L. W. CAMPER, at Indiana Hunch; GEORGE 
B. HORN1SH, Marysvillc; or E. W. HASKELL, Pacific 
Fruit Market, San Frauclsco. 24vlS-lui 



Farms and City Property. 

C. II. WAKELEE A CO., 

601 California street, S. W. Corner Kearny street, buy and 
sell Farms and City Real Estate. Parties wishing lo invest 
will find it to their interest to call on the . 13v!8-3m 



Piiinj) Leather. 

The attention of MINING COMPANIES, and others re- 
quiring a superior article for Hydraulic purposes, is Invited 
to the heavy Oaked Tanned Pump Leather, manufactured 
and prepared expressly by the undersigned. 



. E.JONES&C? / 



Constantly on hand and for sale by 

GRAY, JONES «fc CO., 

Depot of the Santa Cruz Tannery, 

418 Battery St., Snn Francisco. 

25vl7-ly 



J. J. JONES, 

CA.Ttl'ETSrTEIt and BTJIILIfrEIt, 

lYo. 334 Jackson street, between Snnsome and 
Battery, 



W. C. CAMPBELL. 

PATTERN AN» MODEIi MAKER, 

No. SO Fremont street, over Phoenix Iron Works, San 

Francisco. 
Particular attention given tn MODELS for the Patent Office 
Brands and Pattern Letters Cut. 4vlSmlf 



J. F. PAGES, 

SE-A-X. DElVOHAVEIt, 

ANB LETTER CUTTER. 

Brass and Steel Stamps and Dies, 008 Sacramento street, 

San Francisco. Orders bv express promptly attended to. 

6vl6 



DESKS AND OFFICE FURNITURE. 
JOHNSON~& BEST, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

X>eslcs arid. Office Fxirnltiire, 

717 Market street, near/Thlrd, up Sttilrs. 

Warerooms, 413 Pine street, Russ Block, 

A large variety of Desks always on hand ; all kinds of Ofllce 
Furniture and Cabinet Work made to order. 



For Miners, Millmen and Metallurgists. 

KUSTEL'S NEW WORK, 
CONCENTBATIOIN 

Of all kinds of Ores, and the 

CHLORINATION PROCESS, 

For Gold-Bcaring Sulphurets. Arseniurets, and Gold and 
Silver Ores generally. 

Price, - S7.50 



A liberal discount to the Trade. For sale by the Bookseller.* 

Sent to anj pari of the United States, postage paid, 

on receipt of the price. Address, 

T^EWJEY «fc CO-, I*ul>HslLers, 

Office of the Mining and Scientific Press, 414 Clay street' 
16vltf SAN FRANCISCO. 



Mining Secretary. 

THE SUBSCRIBER, HAVING SERVED FOR THE LAST 
five vcars as Secretary of various mining companies, 
feels fully competent to serve In that capacity. Any for- 
ties wishing to secure the services of a Secretary cap. be 
accommodated on reasonable terms. Information given, 
and all necessarv papers correctly made out. 

Having had a long experience in the purchasing of goods 
and machinery for miners, parties in the mines will find it 
to their nd van tat-'C, where purchasing agents are employed, 
to send their orders to the ""''"SJ^BUFFjNUTpy, 

Room S7 New Merchants' Exchange, California street, 
San FiaucUuo 17rlG-tf 



SA1V FRANCISCO 

Pioneer Screen "Works, 

JOHN W. QUICK, Manufacturer, 

Removed to A. Prltzel's Iron Works, 203 Fremont street, 
near Howard, San Francisco. 

Screen Punching in all its branches, at rates reduced 
from 25 to 40 per cent, less than the established rates. I can 
furnish Improved Quartz Screens several sizes finer than 
any Screen ever punched, giving universal satisfaction, 
and forstrcngth, cheapness and durability are not excelled. 
Also, Punched Screens of all sizes and fineness made from 
all qualities ot material, for Quartz. Cement, Flour and 
Rice Mills, etc. Screen Punching made a specialty; there- 
fore millmen forwarding their orders to me will receive 
none but the best. Orders solicited. 

N. B— J. W. QUICK is the only competentand successful 
manufacturer of Screens in the State, having made Screens 
for the principal mills in this Slate and adjoining Terri- 
tories for many years. Qunrtz intll owners using punched 
Screens which have universally failed to give satisfaction, 
when visiting the city will please call a.iu sec me. 5vl7-ly 



Pacific Chemical Works. 

SULPHURIC ETIU2R. 

SPIRITS OF NITRE, 
idl.t AMMONIA, 
ACETIC ACID, 

CTAKIBE OF POTASSIUM 

— AND — 

ACIDS AND CHEMICALS OF ALL KINDS. 

FALKENAU & HANKS, 

Office and Laboratory, Sixteenth street, be- 
tween Folsom and ll.nil-.on. 

LOUIS FALKENAU, Stabp Assayer. 

BSj- Particular attention paid to the Analysis of ORES 
MINERALS, METALS, etc. 8vl7 



THE GIANT 

POWDEE COMPANY 

Is now prepared to All all orders for 

GIANT POWDER, 

Pnt up In Boxes, cither In ltnlk or In Car 

trldges. 

General Agents, 

BANDMAN1V, NIELSEN & CO., 

25vl6-3m 210 Front street, San Francisco. 



Postmasters are requested to punctually inform usof the 
removal of subscribers of the Press from their locality, 
or of neglectto take the paper out of the office from any 
»:ause— when the subscriber omits that duty himself. It is 
not our intention lo send this journal to any party longer 
than It is desired. If we inadvertently do so, subscribers 
and others will please inform us. 



JrLT 24, 1809.] 



Tlcye Mining and Scientific Press. 



59 



A Week's Wokk in Birmingham. — 
" Fourteen million pens, ten tons of pins, 
four thousand miles of iron and steel wire, 
three hundred million cut nails, one hun- 
dred million buttons.six thousand bedsteads, 
seven thousand guns, twenty thousand 
pairs of spectacles, one thousand saddles, 
thirty-eight thousand pounds' worth of 
jewelry, six tons of paj>ier mache ware, five 
tona of hair-pins, hooks and eyes, and eye- 
lets, one hundred and thirty thousand 
gross of wood screws, five hundred tons of 
nuts, screw-bolts, spikes, and rivets, fifty 
tons of wrou^ht-iron hinges, three hun- 
dred miles length of wax for vestas, forty 
tons of refined metal, forty tons of Ger- 
man silver, one thousand dozen of fenders, 
three thousand live hundred bellows, one 
thousand roasting-jacks, one hundred and 
fifty sewing machines, eight hundred tons 
of brass and copper wares, besides an al- 
most endless multitude of miscellaneous 
articles, of which no statistics can bo 
givon." 



Amount of Material in the New Cable. 
The copper wire in the French cable would, 
if laid out in a straight line, be sufficient 
to just go round the world; tho iron wire 
would go round one and a half times; the 
Manila strands would go round five times. 



GEO. E. ROGERS, 

(Succeaaor tu G. W. Bell.) 

A. S J5 A. Y E R. , 

£19 Call ft* rail* it., Sun FruncWco. 

J. A. mark, Afsayor. 

Ores carefully Assayed. Gold and Silver Ores worked. 

2Svl6-orIOpnr 



CALIFORNIA. 

BUSINESS UNIVERSITY 

S04 Montgomery Street. 

Fall particulars regarding or Practical Course of Sludle 
may be Ivid bv calling at the University, or liv addressing 
l/Vl7qyU|> E. P. HEAL.D, San Francisco. 



WINDMILL 

For Sale Cheap ! 



Entirely Xew and of Modern and Approved 
Style. 

For particulars apply to or address this office. 



Gold Metal. M 



THE SOLO hetal watches 

Now being Introduced by 

O. E. OOLLIIVS &z CO., 

No. 020 Washington Street, 

SAN FBAKCISCO, 

Surpass anything yet made In the way of an Imitation Gold 
Watch. They wear well, and keep good time. 

The Ladles* Watche* cost $8 and SIO each. 
The Gentlemen's coat $15 and S3© euch. 
Chulns, iViim *:t to #0 each. 



RECOMMENDATIONS: 

San %rahcisco. May 12, I860. 
This is to certify, that I have carried one of the small size 
Gold Hetal Watches which I got of C. E Collins & Co., and 
I find that It runs as well, and keeps as good time, as any 
watch I ever carried, and I can therefore recommend 
them. I am engaged on the Sacramento steamer "Chrys- 
opolis." 



C. A. COLBY. 



lam engineer on the San Jose Railroad. I have been 
carrying oue of C. E. Collins Jt Co's watches for about one 
year, and I can safely say U is the very best watch for time 
that I have ever seen. GEO. CORNWALL. 

Engineer on the San Juse Railroad. 

Batavia, Jnly 6th, 1869. 
Mkssr-. C. E. Collins & Co.— Gentlemen:— I received the 
Lady's Watch sent by you, and was much pleased with it. 
I wish to know what you will furnish me six of them for, 
with chains to match. Yours, etc.. 

W. 11. DUKE, 
Batavia, C. P. R. R. 

The public arc cautioned against buying their watches 
at high prices, as many of them arc sold for genuine Gold 
WaUhea, at from $100 to *15U each. 

For List of Prices and Description of Goods, send directly 
to us. Can be sent by Express to be paid for on delivery. 
G. J-:. COLLINS A CO., 
No. 629 Washington street, San Francisco. 
p. s,— Where six watches of the above arc ordered at one 
time, we will send one extra, free of all charges. 

We also deal in the flnestGold and Silver Watches, Watch 
Materials, etc. Send for circulars or prises. 
26vl8.it 



0ABL0S O'DONNELL'S 

California Cordial Tonic, 

— OR— 

Wild Clierry Bitters. 

TRADE (J, 0. J), MARK. 



This elegant preparation la acknowledged by all who have 
used It to be the most cfllcletit rumedy lor every disease ol 
the 

ST"M it'll A Ml BOWELS, 

Yet Introduced, to thenotlco of the public. Immediately on 
taking a dose oflt, the patient will tlnd a genial glow per- 
vading his entire system, and lis steady use fbralhort 
time will be followed by n healthy appetite and a good di- 
gestion, even In the case of the most confirmed dyspeptic. 
To all who are suffering from 

INDIGESTION, 

DYSPEPSIA, 

DYSENTERY, 

DIARRIlfEA,] 

NERVOUS AFFECTIONS, 

Or any of the manifold troubles caused by a diseased action 
of the stomach, this remedy la confidently recommended 
as a safe and certain cure. 

N. It. JACOBS <V CO., Sole Agents, 
15vl8-3m 423 Front street, San Francisco. 






S ■■AMDTHE-OfQX& 



Tl>;ii will resist the extremes of heat and 
cold without liquefying or hardening. 

It Is therefore peculiarly adapted to the varied climate of 
this coast, especially localities where THE WEATHER 
BECOMES EXCESSIVELY HOT, causing oil and all other 
kinds of grease to run from the axle, retaining the proper 
position. It remains soft until exhausted, leaving no 
deposit of GCM, TAROR PITCH. Its superior lubricating 
properties, durability and cheapness have been tried and 
approved bv the CENTRAL PACIFIC AND OTHER RAIL- 
ROADS. STAGE PROPRIETORS, STAKLE KEEPERS, 
TEAMSTERS, CONTRACTORS, MILLMEN, FARMERS, 
and many others who prefer to 

USC NONE BUT THE BEST. 

It being prepared by a peculiar CHEMICAL COMBINA- 
TION OF OIL, previously freed from guin or other delete- 
rious substances, it must be obvious that by its use friction 
will be reduced to the lowest point. We leel assured that 
all desiring A NO. 1 LUBRICATOR will give this the prefer- 
ence over any oilier Grease IN THE MARKET. 

Sold by the Trade generally, and at the Factor}'. lOO 
Commercial street, San Francisco. 

24vl8-3m PETTIT Az CO. 



California Steam Navigation 

553£J COMPANY. 



Steamer CAPITAL CAPT. E. A. POOLE 

CHRYSOFOLIS CAPT. A. FOSTER. 

" YOSEMITE 

" CORNELIA CAPT. W. BROMLEY 

JULIA CAFT. E. CONCKLIN. 

Two of the above steamers leave BROADWAY WHARF 
at 1 o'clock P. M. EVERY DAY (Sundays excepted), one 
for Sacramento and one tor Stockton, those for Sacra- 
mento connecting with light-drafi steamers for Marysville 
Colusa, Chico, and Red Bluff. 

Office of the Company, northeast corner of Front and 
Jackson streets. 

B. M. 1IAKTSIIOKYK, 
■3vi2 President. 



THE CHARLES HARKNESS 
Patent Wax Candlos, 

Have now an established reputation on this Coast. Their 
uniform quality, much superior to any Adamantine Can- 
dles, is 

Well Know